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99 Good News Stories You Probably Didn’t Hear About in 2018

99 Good News Stories You Probably Didn’t Hear About in 2018 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the last 12 months, the global media has been focused on a lot of bad news. But there were other things happening out there too: conservation successes, huge wins for global health, more peace and tolerance, less war and violence, rising living standards, some big clean energy milestones, and a quiet turning of the tide in the fight against plastic. Stories of human progress, that didn’t make it into the evening broadcasts, or onto your social media feeds.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world isn't all sunshine and rainbows, but far too often the news will give us an overly pessimistic viewpoint about the world (as mentioned in Hans Rosling’s Book, FACTFULNESS).  Slow, incremental progress isn't dramatic enough to make the headlines, and consequently we often miss the evidence that will demonstrate the ways in which the world is improving.  This article wrapping up some positive news from 2018 then, is a welcome bit of news that might change how we perceive some aspects of world.  

 

Scoop.it Tagsstatistics, development, perspective.

WordPress Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Factfulness

"The three authors of Factfulness explain why they decided to write the book that is now available in 24 languages."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I just finished Hans Rosling’s book, Factfulness.  It was an absolutely delightful read (who wouldn’t want to imagine hearing Hans Rosling’s voice while relaxing on the beach?).  So much of the populace have outdated paradigms about the world and too many have an overly pessimistic worldview that everything is getting worse.  This is why FACTFULNESS is so needed day.  This term is used to describe a fact-based, data-driven worldview that is not overly dramatic, or fear-based.  In so many ways, the world has been consistently getting quantifiable better; this derived from an optimistic perspective, but a factful understanding of the world today.  This book is his clarion call to understand the world as it actually is and is the culmination of his professional achievements.  Now that he has passed away, it feels like a major part of his lasting legacy.  If you’ve ever used his TED talks, Gapminder, the Ignorance Project, or Dollar Street resources, this is a must read.

 

Tagsstatistics, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective, book reviews.

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As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger

As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The wealthiest country, which spends the most money on care for the sick, has far from the best health outcomes. Babies born in eastern Kentucky, along the Mississippi Delta and on Native American reservations in the Dakotas have the lowest life expectancies in the country. If current health trends continue, they aren’t expected to live much beyond an average of 70 years. Meanwhile, a baby born along the wealthy coast of California can be expected to live as long as 85 years, the authors found."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Julia May's curator insight, July 20, 2017 6:21 PM
Very interesting article but a haunting truth! 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 13, 2017 2:00 AM

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Why Did Americans Stop Moving?

Why Did Americans Stop Moving? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Census reports that a record-low share of Americans are moving. A recent paper suggests government policies might be curbing mobility.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, when I've taught world regional geography, I've often discussed a major regional characteristic of North America is the high degree of internal mobility...that appears to be changing and it brings up more questions than answers.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there regions in the United States where people are less likely to move?  How does mobility impact economic, cultural, and political patterns in the United States? Why are less people moving now than before?  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, USA, statistics.

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Maria Isabel Bryant's curator insight, February 23, 2017 2:19 AM
On residential patterns....
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Why you're probably wrong about levels of immigration in your country

Why you're probably wrong about levels of immigration in your country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In developed countries around the world, people think immigrant populations are much larger than they actually are.

 

Americans consistently mention immigration as one of the nation’s most pressing political concerns, and it has become a signature issue in the presidential campaign. But while many Americans consider immigration one of the biggest issues for the future president, surveys suggest that they also have little understanding of the scale of the problem. The United States wasn’t alone in this tendency to exaggerate.

 

Tags: migrationstatistics, political.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 3, 2016 6:26 AM

Global challenges: Population 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 3, 2017 3:03 PM
Support immigration debates with some solid facts
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Why I make cartograms with second graders

Why I make cartograms with second graders | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There are few sights more heartening than that of an elementary school whose classrooms and hallways are decorated with world maps. Yet teachers should be careful to make sure that the standard depiction of the world map is not the only map their students encounter. Otherwise, they run the risk that children will assume 'this is the way the world looks,' rather than the more complicated reality that 'this is one of many ways of representing our world.' One useful antidote to this way of thinking is for students to explore cartograms, which are maps that use the relative area of places to present statistical data.  Please check out my cartogram lesson plan."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love this post because it shows that--adjusting for mathematical proficiency and cartographic skill--just about any group of students can work on projects to work with data and explore various ways of how to represent that data.  

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, statistics, spatial, mapping. 

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The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you

The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How to tell two radically different stories with the same dataset.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Mapping matters, but that doesn't mean that maps convey an objective truth.  They are rhetorical devices used to convince and persuade.  So approach maps critically because while they can convey great spatial patterns, they can conceal patterns just as easily.  

 

Tagsstatisticscartography, visualization, mapping.

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Jose Sepulveda's curator insight, July 29, 2016 6:19 PM
thee precaution should be taken with environmental data published as integrated variable maps   
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 4, 2016 2:12 PM
Maps, like statistics, can tell very different stories using the same information!  Read this for some examples!
Mr Mac's curator insight, August 17, 2017 12:17 AM
Unit 1 - Thematic Maps (use of )
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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tagsstatisticsdevelopment, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 29, 2016 2:19 AM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 5:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 2016 9:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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The Fastest Growing Economies

The Fastest Growing Economies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See how the world's largest and fastest growing economies change over time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 8:49 PM

the most surprising thing about this is how india has one of the worlds largest economies but is far behind both the united states and china as well as many european countries in economic growth. also how china can have the worlds number one economy but the united states is so far ahead in economic growth numbers, i suppose that china will not be on top for very long.

Loic's curator insight, June 16, 2017 2:17 PM

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 15, 2018 2:32 AM
In this article lists the worlds largest economies.

1. Unites States
2. China
3. Japan
4. Germany
5. India
6. France
7. United Kingdom
8. Brazil 
9. Italy
10. Canada
11. Korea
12. Russia
13. Australia
14. Spain
15. Mexico
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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 5:10 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

Matt Danielson's curator insight, September 24, 2018 6:42 PM
The Costa Rica economy has flourished under globalism. The environment was perfect for investment Given the well-educated labor force and stable government. This combination creates for the possibility for economic boom with the right investment. Once this investment was made, more jobs were created and exports skyrocketed, in a 17 year period exports went up to 11x what they were preciously. Even though this company is leaving Costa Rica I believe will find other investors. The tool to understand complex economies works great. In the example used you could see a country's growth in  a particular market and be able to judge efficiently how the market is growing and the shares of the market controlled. This makes it easier to see where one should invest his capital.
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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 7:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project

10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about poverty in Africa that demonstrate the widespread consequences of poverty that affect education, health, food consumption and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  


TagsAfrica, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 6, 2015 2:48 AM

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  

 

Tags: Africa, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 8:15 PM

The issues outlined by Western media concerning Africa are serious problems that the continent will continue to face over the course of the next century. However, Western media has a tendency to focus only on the troubles faced by Africa rather than its successes. We grow up hearing of starving children in Ethiopia, government instability, and the need for the West to donate and help their "less fortunate" kin. Africa has, in fact, made serious strives in terms of economic development, with serious foreign investment- particularly from the Chinese- and the growth of Africa's own industrial base contributing to rapid improvements in standards of living and infrastructure. The West continues to paint the picture of Africa that fits the narrative it has painted for the past century- an underdeveloped continent reliant on Western aid. However, despite the issues outlined in this article remaining serious issues, it cannot be denied that Africa has enjoyed serious progress over the past two decades. The political instability that plagued the continent for much of the second half of the 20th century has diminished, and will only continue to improve. Africa is turning into a major economic force on the world stage, no matter what the media is telling us- it will be interesting to see how much longer this false image of Africa can continue to be portrayed to the public.

Soraya's curator insight, May 4, 2018 6:46 PM
Share your insight
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The Enlightenment Is Working

The Enlightenment Is Working | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Don’t listen to the gloom-sayers. The world has improved by every measure of human flourishing over the past two centuries, and the progress continues, writes Steven Pinker."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article that only reiterates what was said in Hans Rosling's Book, FACTFULNESS, that the world is getting better. 

Scoop.it Tagsstatistics, development, perspective.

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Renata Hill's comment, December 7, 2018 9:17 PM
I'm aware that the book was written by the most privileged of people on the planet: a white male. Of course he has a rosy view. For those of without such privilege, especially people of color in poor socio-economic stratas, life is difficult.
#CheckYourself
dustin colprit's curator insight, December 10, 2018 2:35 PM
It is important for more information providing facts supporting how the world is in fact becoming more enlightened. In today's current society a lot of people gather information from social media and other information outlets that are not always accurate. But their research will often stop here and they will already form an opinion. I think moving away from this and getting more accurate information to people would help the progress of enlightenment. 
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The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Labels and categories are so often problematic, but they are also necessary to make sense of the vast amount of information.  Regional geography is inherently about lumping places together that have commonalities, but acknowledging that many differences from place to place makes the world infinitely varied and complex.  Since we can’t process an infinite amount of complexity, we categorize, for better or for worse.  In education, we are continually trying to show how some categorizations fail, hoping that our students will categorize the information they receive in better ways (non-racist ways for example).  The regional terms we use--Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, etc.—impacts how we think about the world.  Each of those terms highlights a few similarities and ignores some important differences.  The terms More Developed Countries (MDCs), Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs), and Less Developed (LDCs) is how many people have socioeconomically categorized the world’s countries, some preferring developing countries instead of LDCs because it less stigmatizing.  In 2015, many at the World Bank have thought that the term “Developing Countries” obscures more than it reveals.  In 2016, the World Bank removed the term from its database since there are more differences than similarities in the economic structures and trajectories of developing countries.         

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the major problems that you see with the term developing country?  Even with its problems, what utility is there in the term?  Will you keep using the term or will you abandon it?  How come? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, statistics, economicindustry.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 8:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 2018 11:51 AM
I agree that it is important to categorize in order to learn and group things together. I understand some of the implications but it is nonetheless important to the way we learn about other areas. To do away with all labels of this kind will not make the topic and world view more inclusive, but instead make things so complicated that people will either not understand it or not bother with it's complexities. Things need to be distinguished between qualities and traits in order for proper analysis. 
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2018 7:55 AM
This article explains how the World Bank is removing the term "developing country" from its data. This means that developed countries and developing countries all get lumped into one. This can change the way we view some countries compared to others. This can also help remove the stigma people have for certain countries. The downside to this is countries identify themselves differently from other countries and want to be identified as their own country. This can strip the identities of a country if it gets lumped together with another region or as one continent. 
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Why do women live longer than men?

Why do women live longer than men? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the social inequality women experience, they live longer than men. This is the case without a single exception, in all countries.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The question “why do women live longer than men?” is both biological and cultural.  This means that 1) gender as a cultural construct that influences behavior is a mitigating factor and 2) sex, as a biochemical issue, is a separate set of determining factors.  Estrogen benefits women because it lowers “bad” cholesterol) and “good” cholesterol, but testosterone does the opposite.  Women are more likely to have chronic diseases, but non-fatal chronic disease, but men are more prone to the more fatal chronic illnesses.  For the cultural reasons, men are less likely to seek treatment, adhere to the prescribed treatment, commit suicide, and engage in more risky behavior.  While these may read like a list of gendered stereotypes that don’t apply to all, when looking at the global data sets, these trends hold  and are more likely to be true.  How masculinity and femininity is constructed certainly shapes many of these factors and deserves some discussion. 

 

Tags: culture, population, mortality, development, cultural norms, statisticsgender

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Americans Moving at Historically Low Rates

Americans Moving at Historically Low Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The percentage of Americans moving over a one-year period fell to an all time low in the United States to 11.2 percent in 2016.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, when I've taught world regional geography, I've often discussed a major regional characteristic of North America is the high degree of internal mobility...that appears to be changing and it brings up more questions than answers.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there regions in the United States where people are less likely to move?  How does mobility impact economic, cultural, and political patterns in the United States? Why are less people moving now than before?  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, USA, statistics.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 31, 2016 1:29 AM

Internal migration in USA can make an interesting comparison with Australia 

 

Syllabus 

Internal migration  

Students investigate reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia and another country, for example: 

  • analysis of trends in temporary and permanent internal migration
  • discussion of economic, social or environmental
  • consequences of internal migration on places of origin and destination

Geoworld 9 NSW

Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and USA

 

Chapter 8: Migration changes Australia and USA

8.8 Australians are mobile people

8.9 Mobile indigenous populations

8.10 Lifestyle migration

8.11 The power of resources

8.12 Migration changes the USA

 

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DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population

Seth Dixon's insight:

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 22, 2016 11:54 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 2017 1:40 PM
Where would we be without Hans?
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More young adults are living with their parents

More young adults are living with their parents | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Across much of the developed world, researchers have found that more young adults are living at their parents' home for longer periods of time.

 

Across the European Union’s 28 member nations, nearly half (48.1%) of 18- to 34-year-olds were living with their parents in 2014, according to the EU statistical agency Eurostat.  The Scandinavian countries have the lowest rates, with Denmark coming in at 18.6%. Southern and eastern European countries tend to have higher rates, led by the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia: 72.5% of 18- to 34-year-olds reportedly were living with their parents.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't news because this trend gradually became a new part of the economic and cultural norms of the developed world--but the impact is enormous.  In the United States, more young adults live with parents than partners (for the first time in the 130 years that the statistic has been collected).  The world isn't what it was in 1880.  

32.1% of young adults in the U.S live with parents, and 48.1% of young adults in the European Union Union live with parents.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some contributing factors to this trend in the United States and Europe?  What does this say about housing costs, economic, and cultural conditions? 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, housingstatisticspopulation, cultural norms, culture.

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For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners

For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For the first time in more than 130 years, Americans ages 18-34 are more likely to live with their parents than in any other living situation, according to a new analysis by the Pew Research Center.  Less educated young adults are also more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts — no surprise, Pew notes, given the financial prospects in today's economy.  Black and Hispanic young people, compared with white people, are in the same situation.  But the overall trend is the same for every demographic group — living with parents is increasingly common.  Still, young Americans are still less likely to live with their parents than their European counterparts, Pew says.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I find that the best statistics have great explanatory power, make sense when placed in the right context, and STILL manage to leave you amazed.  These stats fit that bill for me and as the school year is ending, it's a milestone that doesn't mean what it did for generations past.  32.1% of young adults in the U.S live with parents, and 48.1% of young adults in the European Union Union live with parents.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some contributing factors to this trend in the United States and Europe?  What does this say about housing costs, economic, and cultural conditions? 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, housingstatisticspopulation, cultural norms, culture.

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Global Peace Index

"The 2015 Global Peace Index reveals a divided world, with the most peaceful countries enjoying increasing levels of peace and prosperity, while the least peaceful countries spiral into violence and conflict. Explore the state of world peace on the interactive Global Peace Index map. www.visionofhumanity.org "

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Middle East and North Africa is now the world’s least peaceful region for the first time since the Index began, due to an increase in civil unrest and terrorist activity while Europe, the world’s most peaceful region, has reached historically high levels of peace.  This might not seem shocking, but there is a great richness to this dataset that can provide detailed regional information as well as answer some big questions about global security.  Explore the data on your own with this interactive map of Global Peace or also of the states within the United States

 

Tags: political, terrorism, conflict, development, statistics, visualization, mapping, governance.

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Taking Data Visualization From Eye Candy to Efficiency

Taking Data Visualization From Eye Candy to Efficiency | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sophisticated data visualizations are pushing the bounds of what we can process, sometimes to the breaking point. What are the signature styles of contemporary data vis, and will they stand the test of time?


Tags: National Geographic, statistics, visualization, mapping.

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity

"The Atlas is a powerful interactive tool enabling policy makers, entrepreneurs, academics, students and the general public to map the path of diversification and prosperity for 128 countries.  The tool will allow users to explore growth opportunities by country and industry, with the potential to provide input into economic policy and private investment decisions. The analysis may also be used to inform the agendas of development banks in policy recommendations and loan programming; an entrepreneur developing a market plan; an investment promotion agency pitching a new factory, as well as guide other choices we have yet to imagine." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-21a

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is an introduction to the Atlas of Economic Complexity; in it they use the visualization tool to analyze the Netherlands' economy and the cut flower industry.  The Atlas of Economic Complexity is hosted by the Center for International Development at Harvard University (MIT also worked on this project and on their site it is called the Observatory of Economic Complexity).


Tags: developmentindustry, visualization, statistics, economicNetherlandsvideo.

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 19, 2015 4:32 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.


99% of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in the developing world. The good news is that in most countries the rate of maternal mortality has been going down. The bad news is that in eight countries the rate is going up. The shocking news is that the United States is among them. It is the only industrialized country to have that dubious distinction. The rate has in fact been doubling in recent years.


Tag: mortality, developmentgender, statistics, USA.

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Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 12:34 PM
Excellent article for population geography challenges for the future
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 9:17 PM

Good question, Why is the US rate of maternal mortality so high. We pay three times higher the average cost for medical care, then any other industrialized nation of earth? Fred Issa,