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Too Many Men

Too Many Men | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Nothing like this has happened in human history. A combination of cultural preferences, government decree and modern medical technology in the world’s two largest countries has created a gender imbalance on a continental scale. Men outnumber women by 70 million in China and India."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are far-reaching consequences to the gender imbalances in India and China.  The fantastically rich article covers four major impacts: 

Village life and mental health. Among men, loneliness and depression are widespread. Villages are emptying out. Men are learning to cook and perform other chores long relegated to women.

Housing prices and savings rates. Bachelors are furiously building houses in China to attract wives, and prices are soaring. But otherwise they are not spending, and that in turn fuels China’s huge trade surplus. In India, there is the opposite effect: Because brides are scarce, families are under less pressure to save for expensive dowries. 

Human trafficking. Trafficking of brides is on the rise. Foreign women are being recruited and lured to China, effectively creating similar imbalances in China’s neighbors.

Public safety. With the increase in men has come a surge in sexual crime in India and concerns about a rise in other crimes in both countries. Harassment of schoolgirls in India has in some towns sparked an effort to push back — but at a cost of restricting them to more protected lives.

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

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Kami Romeike's curator insight, July 4, 3:21 AM

There are far-reaching consequences to the gender imbalances in India and China.  The fantastically rich article covers four major impacts: 

Village life and mental health. Among men, loneliness and depression are widespread. Villages are emptying out. Men are learning to cook and perform other chores long relegated to women.

Housing prices and savings rates. Bachelors are furiously building houses in China to attract wives, and prices are soaring. But otherwise they are not spending, and that in turn fuels China’s huge trade surplus. In India, there is the opposite effect: Because brides are scarce, families are under less pressure to save for expensive dowries. 

Human trafficking. Trafficking of brides is on the rise. Foreign women are being recruited and lured to China, effectively creating similar imbalances in China’s neighbors.

Public safety. With the increase in men has come a surge in sexual crime in India and concerns about a rise in other crimes in both countries. Harassment of schoolgirls in India has in some towns sparked an effort to push back — but at a cost of restricting them to more protected lives.

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

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How to Train Your Dragon Child

How to Train Your Dragon Child | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, there’s a spike in births among certain communities across the globe, including the U.S. Why? Because the Year of the Dragon, according to Chinese folk belief, confers power, fortune, and more. We look at what happens to Dragon babies when they grow up, and why timing your kid’s birth based on the zodiac isn't as ridiculous it sounds.
Seth Dixon's insight:

1976. 1988. 2000. 2012.  We often assume that births on a graph in any given year will follow a smooth linear pattern similar to the years around it, but the Chinese zodiac and the mythical standing of the dragon can create spikes in diasporic communities away from the mainland.  This economic podcast offers an interesting glimpse into the looks some of the communal impacts of a mini-baby boom and cultural reasons for these patterns. 

 

Tags: Taiwanpodcast, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What regions can you identify as a part of a trend?  What possible factors have led to these patterns?  What are the long-term implications of this data? 

 

Tags: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration. 

 

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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 17, 5:08 PM
The population changes in Europe recently seem to be related to both low birth rates and an increase in migration.  Based on this map the most significant patterns seem to be that areas in south Eastern Europe are experiencing great population lows while France and Ireland’s populations are making significant gains.  This trend could most likely be explained by migration.  People in the regions of great population loss are most likely moving northwest in order to fill the many vacancies in Western Europe.  The reason that these vacancies exist is because the population of Europe overall is aging, so there are many spots open from retirees.  At the same time, the birth rates in most of Europe are so low it is causing the overall population of the continent to gradually decrease.  Without domestic workers to fill positions, companies in areas with low birth rates, like France and Spain, are forced to hire foreign employees.  The population loss in the eastern part of Europe seems to be due to migration.  Whereas on farther west, the regions with high population losses, such as Spain, Denmark, and southern Italy, can be explained by low birth rates.  The increased tension recently regarding immigration policies and Great Britain’s exit from the European Union can be explained by these trends.  As people with different ethnic backgrounds who do not speak the languages of the countries they migrate to continue to enter countries in large numbers, many Europeans begin to feel threatened.  This is why there are protests and the rise of political parties who run on anti-immigrant platforms.  
brielle blais's curator insight, March 24, 11:27 AM
Between 2001 and 2011 there has been serious demographic changes occurring all over Europe. The eastern section has seen a lot of suburbanization since the end of the Communist era and the early period of capitalism. There was once a lack of cash and depleating economy but now cities finally have the capital and chance to to build one family homes which allowed for the 2% growth. As for northwestern regions, the population has decreased as impoverished regions in the southwest draw in retiring or downsizing Europeans instead, as they want the sunshine and cheaper prices on things. This article shows how geography can truly shape the rise and fall of demographic in a country. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 1:34 PM
This article looks at Europe’ s changing population. Although many cities, like Prague and Bucharest have been experiencing a 1-2% population increase, other countries, such as countries in the east and northwest, have had a 1-2% decrease in population. Similarly, Turkey has a declining population as well. The author of this article argues that this steady decline is occurring because the citizens are leaving the rural countryside to find more job opportunities in the cities.
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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 2017 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo

Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 2017 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties

50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I was inspired by 50% of the U.S. lives in these counties. map. I was wondering what the equivalent map for Canada would look like. I couldn't find one, so I created my own."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During the U.S. presidential election much was made about the differences between rural and urban regions of the United States.  Clearly the United States isn't the only North American country that has a highly clustered population distribution. 

 

Question to Ponder: How does this basic demographic reality impact Canadian politics, policies, infrastucture, culture, etc.?

 

TagsCanadamap, North America, population, density.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 23, 2017 5:35 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 25, 7:38 PM
This post is particularly interesting because it shows just how the population is impacted by the geography of the land. Like most civilizations, fifty percent of Canada's population is centered around waterways, an excellent resource for trade and communication to the bordering nation. 
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Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Born in Japan, Gursewak Singh considers himself Japanese. The government doesn't. But it offers children like him a chance to stay - if their parents leave.

 

Gursewak’s parents, who are Sikhs, fled to Japan from India in the 1990s. For several years, they lived without visas under the radar of the authorities until they were put on a status known as “provisional release” in 2001. It means they can stay in Japan as long as their asylum application is under review.  While there were almost 14,000 asylum cases under review at the end of 2015, Japan accepted only 27 refugees last year. The year before that, the number was 11.

The low acceptance rate stands in stark contrast to Europe, which has seen hundreds of thousands of refugees arrive from countries such as Iraq, Syria and Eritrea. In the first half of the year, European countries ruled on 495,000 asylum applications, approving more than 293,000.

 

Tags: culture, Sikhdeclining populationpopulationmigrationrefugees, JapanEast Asia,             .

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Mapping the World's Migration Flows

Mapping the World's Migration Flows | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Visualizing the flow of the world's migrants from country to country.

 

Based on data from the U.N. Population Division, this map shows the estimated net migration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.

Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people.

Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. Click a circle to view only the migration flows in and out of that country.

For more info about this map, read the article, All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map.

 

Tags: migration, USA, mapping, population, unit 2 population.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, December 13, 2016 8:33 PM
Geography Concept Focus: Patterns and Trends
Leah Goyer's curator insight, December 14, 2016 1:30 PM
What a fascinating view.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:46 PM

Migration at a global scale changes places 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia and another country, for example: 

  • analysis of trends in temporary and permanent internal migration
  • discussion of economic, social or environmental consequences of internal migration on places of origin and destination

Students investigate the reasons for and effects of international migration to Australia, for example: 

  • analysis of international migration patterns 
  • explanation of where and why international migrants settle within Australia 
  • examination of characteristics and spatial patterns of Australia’s cultural diversity 

Geoworld 9 NSW
Chapter 8: Migration changes Australia and the USA

8.1 Migration: people own the move

8.2 Australia: destination nation

8.3 Where do immigrants settle

8.4 Culturally diverse australia: trends in migration

 

8.8 Australians are mobile people

8.9 Mobile indigenous populations

8.19 Lifestyle migration

8.11 The power of resources: the Pilbara

8.12 Migration changes the USA

Geothink 

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Why Malthus Is Still Wrong

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why Malthus makes for bad science policy
Seth Dixon's insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated and inspired some policies that were especially damaging.  This anti-Malthusian op-ed was written by the Publisher of Skeptic Magazine; I typically pair this with the neo-Malthusian op-ed written by the  President of the Canada's Population institute.  Comparing and contrasting the merits of these articles provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tagsop-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 2017 8:05 AM
What did Malthus get right? and what did he get wrong?
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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 2016 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, May 3, 11:58 AM
This video talks about the marriage crisis India and China will be facing over the next few decades. The one child rule that was enforced in the region caused many couples to selectively abort their daughters so they could have sons instead, doing this caused a major population gap between men and women. Now as this group of the population where men so drastically outnumber women come of age the countries face a marriage crisis. With men so drastically outnumbering women and marriage being such an important part of the culture in India and China the countries could undergo severe cultural changes. 
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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 2016 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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More young adults are living with their parents

More young adults are living with their parents | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Across much of the developed world, researchers have found that more young adults are living at their parents' home for longer periods of time.

 

Across the European Union’s 28 member nations, nearly half (48.1%) of 18- to 34-year-olds were living with their parents in 2014, according to the EU statistical agency Eurostat.  The Scandinavian countries have the lowest rates, with Denmark coming in at 18.6%. Southern and eastern European countries tend to have higher rates, led by the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia: 72.5% of 18- to 34-year-olds reportedly were living with their parents.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't news because this trend gradually became a new part of the economic and cultural norms of the developed world--but the impact is enormous.  In the United States, more young adults live with parents than partners (for the first time in the 130 years that the statistic has been collected).  The world isn't what it was in 1880.  

32.1% of young adults in the U.S live with parents, and 48.1% of young adults in the European Union Union live with parents.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some contributing factors to this trend in the United States and Europe?  What does this say about housing costs, economic, and cultural conditions? 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, housingstatisticspopulation, cultural norms, culture.

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Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa

Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The total population in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to grow at a faster pace than in any other region in the decades ahead, more than doubling from 823 million in 2010 to 1.9 billion in 2050. As a result, the two dominant religions in the region – Christianity and Islam – both are expected to have more than twice as many adherents in 2050 as in 2010."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the poorest regions of the world. While the economy is growing, the rate at which poverty is falling is less than the population growth rate.  Nearly all of the population growth in Africa between now and 2050 is expected to occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.  As the population grows, the religious dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa will change.  The share of residents practicing Christianity, the majority religion of the region, is expected to decline from 2010 to 2050 while the share of Muslims is expected to increase in the same time frame.  The changes in religious demographics is occurring alongside the region’s youth bulge (click here for a population pyramid).  Understanding religious demographics is key to understanding the challenges faced by the African people.   

 

Question to Ponder: What impact are the region’s two fastest-growing religions having on Sub-Saharan Africa’s overall fertility rate?    

 

Tagsreligionpopulation, ChristianityIslam, Africa.

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The Population Bomb Has Been Defused

The Population Bomb Has Been Defused | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Some of the most spectacularly wrong predictions in history have been made by those who claim that overpopulation is going to swamp the planet. Thomas Malthus, a British economist writing in the late 1700s, is the most famous of these. Extrapolating past trends into the future, he predicted that population growth would inevitably swamp available food resources, leading to mass starvation. That didn’t happen -- we continued to develop new technologies that let us stay ahead of the reaper.

 

In 1968, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich wrote “The Population Bomb,” warning that unchecked population growth would lead to mass starvation in the 1970s. He was just as wrong as Malthus. Global population did surge, but food production managed to keep up.

 

So far, the prophets of overpopulation have been defeated by technology. But human ingenuity alone can never deliver a final victory in the battle to feed the world -- eventually, population growth will overwhelm the Earth’s ability to provide calories. That’s why in order to put Malthus and Ehrlich finally to rest, a second component is needed -- lower fertility rates. To save both the environment and themselves, humans must have fewer kids.

 

Fortunately, this is happening. During the lifetimes of Malthus and Ehrlich, humans still tended to have large families, with each woman bearing an average of five children over her lifetime. But shortly after Ehrlich’s book, that began to change.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Mathusian ideas are incredibly controversial; there are articles that will proclaim that he was right and others that will point to how he got it all wrong.   The critics of Malthus see that Earth and humanity will survive as fertility rates fall almost everywhere but the Neo-Malthusians see that while fertility rates are dropping, the total population of the world continues to climb.  This article has many great fertility rate charts.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Malthus, op-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

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Which Countries Have Shrinking Populations?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video explores some of the impacts of a declining population on a country (for example, a smaller workforce, economic decline, and growing public debt).  Eastern Europe as a region is used as the principle example and the countries of Bulgaria, Moldova, and Japan are highlighted. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration, Bulgaria, Moldova, Japan.

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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

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As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger

As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The wealthiest country, which spends the most money on care for the sick, has far from the best health outcomes. Babies born in eastern Kentucky, along the Mississippi Delta and on Native American reservations in the Dakotas have the lowest life expectancies in the country. If current health trends continue, they aren’t expected to live much beyond an average of 70 years. Meanwhile, a baby born along the wealthy coast of California can be expected to live as long as 85 years, the authors found."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Julia May's curator insight, July 20, 2017 1:21 PM
Very interesting article but a haunting truth! 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:00 PM

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Why do women live longer than men?

Why do women live longer than men? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the social inequality women experience, they live longer than men. This is the case without a single exception, in all countries.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The question “why do women live longer than men?” is both biological and cultural.  This means that 1) gender as a cultural construct that influences behavior is a mitigating factor and 2) sex, as a biochemical issue, is a separate set of determining factors.  Estrogen benefits women because it lowers “bad” cholesterol) and “good” cholesterol, but testosterone does the opposite.  Women are more likely to have chronic diseases, but non-fatal chronic disease, but men are more prone to the more fatal chronic illnesses.  For the cultural reasons, men are less likely to seek treatment, adhere to the prescribed treatment, commit suicide, and engage in more risky behavior.  While these may read like a list of gendered stereotypes that don’t apply to all, when looking at the global data sets, these trends hold  and are more likely to be true.  How masculinity and femininity is constructed certainly shapes many of these factors and deserves some discussion. 

 

Tags: culture, population, mortality, development, cultural norms, statisticsgender

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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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Is being childless a taboo in Nigeria?

Is being childless a taboo in Nigeria? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Childlessness affects millions of women and couples around the world. Infertility in the man or woman is sometimes the cause, as can be the presence of a medical condition or untreated illness. Women across Africa report that not having a child is often frowned upon, and sometimes carries a stigma. Market-goers in the Nigerian capital, Abuja, share their views with BBC Africa's Bola Mosuro."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Nigeria's population is growing--there are economic as well as cultural explanations for this and in these two videos, the BBC explores some of the cultural factors that impact family size in West Africa.  Some African couples who now live in the U.K. still face some of these cultural pressures to have large families.  

 

Tags: Nigeria, population, demographics.

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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 5:08 PM
This recording from BBC describes the negative attitude that comes from being childless. She explains that it is frowned upon to not have kids. Women will be rejected and questioned even though it may not be her choice to be childless. The woman being interviewed explains that in the eyes of the in laws, a woman is not a real woman until she has had a child. She goes on to explain the significance of having a child in African culture. She says that it is important to have someone, specifically a son,  to carry out the legacy of the family name and inheritance. 
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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?
Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated in a Vox article, "The video above, from the American Museum of Natural History, shows essentially all of human history in just six minutes. It shows humanity spreading across the world over a few hundred thousand years — even as our population remained under 1 million. After that came the rise and fall of many empires and civilizations, plagues, wars, and so on — all the way to our current population of around 7 billion."  Admittedly, the video is a bit "slow" in the middle, but that is a major part of the story of human population growth, and only serves to show how dramatic the population growth is at the end.  This video brings up more questions than it has answers.

 

Tags: demographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, unit 2 population 

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 2017 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
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'Leftover Women' in China

"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This emotional ad about 'leftover women' in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn't as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.

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DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population

Seth Dixon's insight:

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 22, 2016 6:54 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 2017 8:40 AM
Where would we be without Hans?
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Fertility Rates-Differences Within Countries

"An important aspect about country level data of fertility to keep in mind is that there can be considerable heterogeneity within countries, which are hidden in the mean fertility which were discussed in this entry. The mean Total Fertility Rate for India in 2010 was 2.8 (UN Data): But this average hides the fact that the fertility in many Southern Indian regions was below 1.5 (which is similar to the mean fertility in many European countries), while the fertility in Northern India was still higher than 5 children per woman (which is as high as the mean of the African countries with the highest fertility)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a stunning example of uneven development and regional differences within countries.  Too often we discuss countries as if the situation inside the borders of one country is the same throughout it, even if the geographic contexts can be wildly different. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are the fertility rates in so different in northern and southern India?  How does this regional imbalance impact the country?  What are other examples of major differences within a country? 

 

Tags: regions, population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodelsunit 2 population, India, South Asia. 

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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 2016 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.