Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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How to Build a Smart City

How to Build a Smart City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We are in the midst of a historic (and wholly unpredicted) rise in urbanization. But it’s hard to retrofit old cities for the 21st century. Enter Dan Doctoroff. The man who helped modernize New York City — and tried to bring the Olympics there — is now C.E.O. of a Google-funded startup that is building, from scratch, the city of the future.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Urbanism isn't just the study of urban geography as it is, but it also looks to use ideas of design, architectural, transportation, and sustainability to create better cities.  This Freakonomics podcast looks at ways that New York City has changed, with ideas of how to start a new city being experimented with in Toronto.  This 99PI podcast looks at European urbanist ideas that shaped many cities that were damaged during WWII (part II).  Successful cities bring in more residents which bring higher housing costs--so can a city be too successful for it's own good?  San Francisco grapples with changing economic issues as it is too expensive to hire workers to fill low-skill jobs

 

Tagsurbanism, podcast, architecturetransportation, housing, place, planning.

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The Geography of AC

The Geography of AC | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The modern built environment in the United States is now totally dependent on air conditioning. A lot of our buildings would be uninhabitable in the summer without AC, and all of the electricity needed to keep it running."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Like so many 99 percent invisible podcasts, this blends urban design, social geography, local history in a way that deepens our understanding of place. Air conditioning has powerfully reshaped so many geographic patterns that many of ways.  Some mentioned in this podcast include: a) the rapid expansion of the Sun Belt, b) less climatically and regionally distinctive architecture can now be found in the cultural landscape, and c) an enormous amount of energy is consumed to maintain our hyper-cooled buildings (the U.S. now uses as much electricity for air conditioning as it did for all purposes in 1955). 

 

Tagspodcast, architecturehousing, landscape, place planning.

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?
Seth Dixon's insight:

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

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Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 5, 2017 12:13 AM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 2018 9:48 PM
Unit 3
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Mexico City 1968

Mexico City 1968 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The 1968 Olympics took place in Mexico City, Mexico. It was the first Games ever hosted in a Latin American country. And for Mexico City, the event was an opportunity to show the world that they were a metropolis as worthy as London, Berlin, Rome or Tokyo to host this huge international affair. The 1968 Olympics were decreed 'the Games of Peace.' So Wyman designed a little outline of a dove, which shop owners all over the city had been given to stick in their windows. A protest movement, led by students, was growing in the city around [the organizers and designers]. These protestors believed the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) catered to wealthy Mexicans rather than the poor, rural and working class. Although the country had been experiencing huge economic growth, millions of people had still been left behind. The 'Mexican Miracle' hadn’t reached everyone."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Few years are as powerful in the minds of Mexican identity as the year 1968.  Like so many 99 percent invisible podcasts, this blends urban design, social geography, local history in a way that deepens our understanding of place. The built environment can be molded to project an image, and can be used to subvert that same message by the opposition.    

 

Tagssport, Mexico, Middle America, urban, architecture, place, landscape.

 

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 20, 2017 1:16 PM
How has the disparity of the economy affected the density of population in Mexico?  Did the Olympics ultimately help or hurt Mexico?
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My Family’s Slave

My Family’s Slave | Geography Education | Scoop.it
She lived with us for 56 years. She raised me and my siblings without pay. I was 11, a typical American kid, before I realized who she was.

 

The Spanish Crown eventually began phasing out slavery at home and in its colonies, but parts of the Philippines were so far-flung that authorities couldn’t keep a close eye. Traditions persisted under different guises, even after the U.S. took control of the islands in 1898. Today even the poor can have utusans or katulongs (“helpers”) or kasambahays (“domestics”), as long as there are people even poorer. The pool is deep.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article created a huge stir from the moment it was published, especially within the U.S. Filipino community.  Slavery is reprehensible, but to most people today, it is incomprehensible to imagine how one human could ever enslave another.  This story of a Filipino family that brought a ‘domestic worker’ with them to the United States is a riveting tale that offers glimpses into the cultural context of modern-day slavery.  The author was born into this family and it’s a painful tale intermingled with agony, love, cruelty, tenderness, guilt, and growth.  This article is a long read, but well worth it.  You can listen to a 55-minute audio version of the article, or also listen to the NPR 5-minute version.    

 

Tags: migrationlaborPhilippines, culture.

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Memorializing Manzanar

Memorializing Manzanar | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“During World War II the US government incarcerated over 110,000 Japanese Americans, in ten different detention centers throughout the United States.  One of these sites was Manzanar; in 1992, Manzanar was declared a National Historic Site. But apart from the cemetery, there was little there. The committee did not want to settle for a staid, sterile museum and so they worked with the National Park Service to rebuild portions of the camp exactly as they had been during the war. The most powerful symbol might be the site’s newest addition, a replica of the women’s latrine with a trough sink and row of five toilets with no dividers between them. It’s a stark reminder of the humiliation felt by many Japanese Americans during their incarceration.  The annual pilgrimage of Japanese-Americans and others will take place on April 29th, 2017.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

How we collectively remember history in the landscape?  Do you erase national embarrassments that open wounds of the past or is the act of memorialization cathartic and part of becoming a better country?  After Pearl Harbor, the U.S. listened to the fears of the public and military officials and interned U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry.  Today, how this history is remembered is deeply important to many groups in the United States.  There are some great images, videos and primary sources in this episode of the 99 Percent Invisible podcast. 

 

Tagspodcast, culture, California, historical, monumentsplace, landscape.

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How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker

How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Jane Jacobs lacked formal training in city planning but became an urban visionary who promoted dense, mixed-use neighborhoods where people interacted on the streets. She also became the nemesis of New York master builder Robert Moses. On our inaugural episode, we’ll explore Jacobs’ legacy and how the ideas and ideals of 'St. Jane' hold up today."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How do you create a sense of place?  How can you make a neighborhood more vibrant and meaningful to the residents?  These are questions that central to city planners, community organizers, activists, home owners, renters, business owners, and a wide range of local stakeholders.  The Placemakers podcast has many episodes on these topics worth listening to, starting with the one about Jane Jacobs, a leading urbanist who was a proponent of “The Cheerful Hurly-Burly” of the “zoomed in” city life who fought against Robert Moses’ more sterile “zoomed out” spaces of transportation flows.  In another podcast titled “the quest for the perfect place,” the series explores new urbanism and the ideas that have shaped the movement.

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, podcastscale.

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'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts

'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Providence, once the heart of the New England mafia, was chosen for the first season. The approximately 17 to 20 episodes will follow the patterns of corruption in Rhode Island up through the banking crisis of RISDIC, the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice, and City Hall corruption in Operation Plunder Dome."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not just a fascinating local story of my new hometown; this is a riveting portrayal of the urban social geographies of organized crime, corruption, and the cosa nostra.  With only three episode to date, they with entertain and inform listeners with delving into the inner working of the mob (and just a heads up--the language will be crass and actual crimes will be discussed--don't say I didn't warn you).  To be honest, of course season one of Crimetown dad to been about Providence, and it is all the more compelling knowing the neighborhoods that are being shaped in this historical portrayal of Rhode Island.    

 

Tagsurban, crime, Rhode Island, neighborhood, socioeconomic, poverty, podcast.

 

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Alexander peters's curator insight, December 13, 2016 5:24 PM
This was about the tv show that is about the new england mafia. I have watched the show
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In The Mountains Of Georgia, Foxfire Students Keep Appalachian Culture Alive

In The Mountains Of Georgia, Foxfire Students Keep Appalachian Culture Alive | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For 50 years, high school students in Rabun County have chronicled their region's disappearing traditions and mountain people, from blacksmiths to moonshiners, in publications and a living museum.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent, rich example of preserving old elements of rural, folk cultures that are rapidly disappearing.  The project ties local students to the region to appreciate past more and creates a remarkable archive for the future. 

 

Tagsculture, historicalrural, folk culturesthe Southpodcast, unit 3 culture.

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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often assume that one form of technology, a system, institute should work equally well where ever it is.  But the nuances of cultural geography mediate how societies interact with technological innovations, and as demonstrated in this Planet Money podcast, "People in Myanmar (Burma) were reluctant to use ATMs because they didn't trust the banks. They weren't sure that the machines would actually give them their money."  

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, poverty, development, economicpodcast.

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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 11, 2018 2:11 PM
We often take for granted our infrastructe and in this case our banking system. Have we seen recessions, yes , have we seen our banks fail yes, but to not trust them at all well thats another story. In pretty much every American city and most major cities around the world ATMs are very common. I am pretty sure most of us have used an ATM at least once if not all of the time. So when the small country of Myanmar had its sanctions lifted and VISA and Mastecard had the opportunity to put in ATMs they went for it and thought it would be a great ooportunity. They did forsee what would happen though. Myanmar citizens had almost no confidence in their banking system thus most people just kept their money at home with them. So since they did not have money in the banks they did not need to use the ATMs. Its very important for companies, even big ones such as Visa and Mastercard, to understand the market and the culture of the population in which they are setting up the business. If Visa and Mastercard had done a little more research they might have foreseen this problem. In this ever global world it is important for businesses to remain culuturally aware or risk losing mililons.  For start up companies or investment companies it becomes even more important as they do market research as well.
brielle blais's curator insight, May 3, 2018 8:33 PM
This showcases how different cultures in different places really are. The idea of credit cards in Myanmar isn't exactly greeted with positivity. Most people are skeptical of the banks and keep their money at home instead. This way of living seems so different to people from places like the US because Myanmar doesn't have and connection to the US with institutions such as banks and atm. However this way of running a country does not allow for anything to be fixed, which is why is it so rugged, with cars with no floors, awful roads, and anything else that a bank would normally help fund. 
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2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom

2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The global refugee crisis, political strife and economic dislocation all contributed to a worldwide deterioration of religious freedom in 2015 and an increase in societal intolerance, according to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is one of the sad results of the many global conflicts today and increase in reactionary political movements that scapegoat religious minorities.  The image above is a map/wordle of the 18th article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states: "Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance."  

 

Tags: religion, ChristianityIslamBuddhismHinduismJudaism, podcastconflict, refugees.

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As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last

As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For decades, Sweden has served as a haven for those fleeing war and persecution the world over. But the country's traditionally liberal acceptance of refugees is now being questioned. Some 160,000 asylum seekers arrived in the country last year alone, stretching its resources. Sweden's idealistic culture is starting to show cracks.

 

Tagspodcast, culture, Sweden, refugees.

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In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Scientists think an asteroid killed the dinosaurs. In today's extinction, humans are the culprit.  [In this podcast] our guest is Elizabeth Kolbert, author of the book The Sixth Extinction.  The book begins with a history of the big five extinctions of the past and goes on to explain how human behavior is creating this sixth, including our use of fossil fuels which has led to climate change."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 20, 2016 12:22 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 20, 2016 6:41 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 21, 2016 1:26 AM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

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How to Train Your Dragon Child

How to Train Your Dragon Child | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, there’s a spike in births among certain communities across the globe, including the U.S. Why? Because the Year of the Dragon, according to Chinese folk belief, confers power, fortune, and more. We look at what happens to Dragon babies when they grow up, and why timing your kid’s birth based on the zodiac isn't as ridiculous it sounds.
Seth Dixon's insight:

1976. 1988. 2000. 2012.  We often assume that births on a graph in any given year will follow a smooth linear pattern similar to the years around it, but the Chinese zodiac and the mythical standing of the dragon can create spikes in diasporic communities away from the mainland.  This economic podcast offers an interesting glimpse into the looks some of the communal impacts of a mini-baby boom and cultural reasons for these patterns. 

 

Tags: Taiwanpodcast, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

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How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America

How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dollar General stores thrive in low-income rural towns, and the deep-discount chain has opened hundreds of new shops in the past year."

 

Dollar General is set to open 1,000 locations this year, for a total of more than 14,000 stores. It will have more stores than McDonald's has restaurants in the entire country. That includes plenty of urban locations, but the chain's bright yellow and black signs pop up about every 10 miles along many remote state highways. Like Walmart, it has rural roots. Dollar General started in small-town Kentucky. Al Cross, who runs the Institute for Rural Journalism at the University of Kentucky, says Dollar General competes with the world's largest retailer on price and convenience.

 

Tags: rural, retail, podcast.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 2018 11:49 PM
I found this article to be very relevant since the first Dollar General store I've ever seen just popped up within the last year in Rhode Island. Apparently Dollar General is such a big chain in the rest of the country, that it has more stores than Walmart does. According to this article, there are certain advantages and disadvantages of Dollar General building stores in the rural parts of the country. For example this article talks about how people in some rural areas have towns that are so small they don't have any local grocers. So when a Dollar General is built in a town like that, it is a huge benefit to the town. In other cases with small towns that already have a local grocery store, Dollar General can put that store out of business with the difference in their prices. Ultimately, whether or not Dollar General's expansion into rural areas of the U.S. can be seen as negative or positive depends on the local business structure in those small towns.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 16, 2018 8:02 PM
Development
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Pakistan's traditional third gender isn't happy with the trans movement

Pakistan's traditional third gender isn't happy with the trans movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For centuries, South Asia has had its own Khawaja Sira or third gender culture. Now, some third gender people in Pakistan say the modern transgender identity is threatening their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sometimes our assumptions about a society, and how they might react to cultural issues are just that...assumptions.  I for one was very surprised to learn that Pakistan had a traditional third gender. 

 

Tags: culture, developmentpodcast, genderPakistansexuality, South Asia, religion.

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David Stiger's curator insight, November 11, 2018 10:11 PM
From an outsider's perspective, cultures are often hard to pin down. This became clear again when trying to comprehend Pakistan's third gender community. Not to be confused with the more modern transgender community, the third gender - or Khawaja Sira - is manifested in the traditional roots of Islam. It seems like a religiously accepted mode of existing to transcend gender. Because Khawaja Sira falls under the precepts of Islam, it is therefore tolerated but not necessarily embraced. What is interesting is that because there are rules and traditional codes outlining how a Muslim can be Khawaja Sira, there a good deal of hostility towards the modern Western notion of transgender - referring more to a person who "transitions" from the gender of their birth to a gender they more strongly identify with. One would think that Pakistan's third gender community would be more open and understanding of the West's transgender movement. This is not the case. When a Westerner is traveling in Pakistan and notices a third gender option, the person should not assume Pakistan is a bastion for liberal-minded progressives. Instead, Pakistan is just being Pakistan. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 6:55 PM
A topic to discuss. People who don't agree with the beliefs or rights of people in the LGBTQ community will talk about how this is a new issue. That it is the new generation that is creating these ideas.  But multiple genders and sexualities have been around for hundreds of years in many different ways. There are Native American tribes whose people had "two-spirits". Those people fulfilled the third gender ceremonial roles for their communities. In this story, they discuss Khawaja siras are "God's chosen people", the third gender people who can bless or curse anyone. But "God's chosen people" are also greatly discriminated against in society. You see the contradictions that society puts on people who don't conform to what is supposedly right.
 
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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Geographic themes are overflowing (it was an unintended pun, but I'll just let that wash over you) in this podcast.  I suggest playing a game early in the year/semester called "find the geography."  What geographic theme/content areas will your students find in this podcast? 

 

Tagspodcast, mapping, cartography, climate change, environment, watercoastal,  urban, planningurban ecology.

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M Sullivan's curator insight, August 7, 2017 2:14 AM
Useful for Geographical Processes Unit of Inquiry
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From Risking His Life To Saving Lives, Ex-Coal Miner Is Happy To Take The Paycut

From Risking His Life To Saving Lives, Ex-Coal Miner Is Happy To Take The Paycut | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The "Brave New Workers" series tells stories of Americans adapting to a changing economy. This week: after years working in the coal mines of West Virginia, a miner charts a new career in health care.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This series, Brave New Workers, is all about workers adapting to the shifting economic geographies.  Some industries are seen as foundational to a community and there is much angst about the loss of particular jobs.  New technologies are disruptive, and the process of job creation/job loss is sometimes referred to as creative destruction.  My uncle, once about a time, was a typewriter repairman.  Clearly, the personal computer was going to render his niche in the economic system obsolete so he became a web developer.  Not everyone successfully makes a seamless transition, but this collection of stories is emblematic of the modern American worker, needing to nimbly adapt to the labor market.

 

Tagspodcast, industry, manufacturinglabor, economic, USA.  

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#RenunciaYa--Quit Already!

#RenunciaYa--Quit Already! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Morales will take office in the wake of Guatemala’s worst political crisis in decades, resulting in the resignations of President Otto Pérez Molina, Vice President Roxana Baldetti, and multiple cabinet members—all of whom are now prosecuted for their role in a massive corruption ring."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How does an online movement become a revolution?  Much has been made about how much organizing for the Arab Spring was conducted online, but it still needed old-fashioned protesting, gathering in the streets, and controlling symbolic public spaces to add meaning to their movement.  This podcast shows the behind-the-scenes look at how a small online Facebook group against corruption in Guatemala, not only pulled down their targeted villain (the vice president), but also eroded support for the president that propped up the whole system.

  

Tags: Guatemala, political, podcast, Middle America.

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Statehood, Politics, and Scale in D.C.

Statehood, Politics, and Scale in D.C. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Washington may be the political center of the free world, but its 670,000 residents don’t have a say in the national legislature. What they do have is a nonvoting delegate in the House of Representatives. Eleanor Holmes Norton can introduce legislation and vote in committee, but she can’t vote on the House floor. Over the course of 13 terms, the 'Warrior on the Hill' been fighting to change that."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered the podcast "Placemakers" you are missing out.  In this episode, they explore the competing political context of Washington D.C. Since this podcast ran, the citizens of the district voted overwhelmingly for statehood, but since the governance of the district operates more at the national scale then on the local level, statehood is not happening anytime soon.  

 

Tagsplace, podcast, political, autonomyscale, Washington DC.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, December 13, 2016 9:21 PM

If you haven't discovered the podcast "Placemakers" you are missing out.  In this episode, they explore the competing political context of Washington D.C. Since this podcast ran, the citizens of the district voted overwhelmingly for statehood, but since the governance of the district operates more at the national scale then on the local level, statehood is not happening anytime soon.  

 

Tagsplace, podcast, political, autonomyscale, Washington DC.

Leah Goyer's curator insight, December 14, 2016 6:26 PM
Freedom of speech
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After a Tornado, Greensburg, Kansas, Rebuilt Green. Was It Worth It?

After a Tornado, Greensburg, Kansas, Rebuilt Green. Was It Worth It? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A decade ago, a tornado wiped out the small town of Greensburg, Kansas. But the town decided to rebuild—as a totally green community. Ten years out, has the green rebuilding program been successful, and is this a model that might be used by other towns? Or is going green harder than it seems?
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered the podcast "Placemakers" you are missing out.  The entire series centers around the challenges that confront different types of communities and the opportunities to improve the way things work. They present "stories about the spaces we inhabit and the people who shape them. Join us as we crisscross the country, introducing you to real people in real communities—people who make a difference in how we travel, work, and live. You’ll never look at your community the same way again."  And yes, that sounds like a whole lot of applied geography to me.   

 

Tagsplace, tornado, weather and climate, planning, podcast.

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Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets | Geography Education | Scoop.it
During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of A Square Meal, discuss food trends of the time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Peanut butter and school lunches became fixtures of American culture during the Depression.  On the flip side, our modern preference for freshness is a reaction against the Depression's obsession to find ways to preserve food for longer amounts of time.  

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood distribution, historical, podcast.

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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you."  I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 10, 2017 12:03 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you." I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States. See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.
Mr Mac's curator insight, August 11, 2017 1:58 AM
Unit 1 - Human-Environment Interaction; Unit 3 - Culture 
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Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants

Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most food, if we trace it back far enough, began as a seed. And the business of supplying those seeds to farmers has been transformed over the past half-century. Small-town companies have given way to global giants. A new round of industry consolidation is now underway. Multibillion-dollar mergers are in progress, or under discussion, that could put more than half of global seed sales in the hands of three companies."

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, podcast.

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Zack Zeplin's curator insight, April 24, 2016 10:16 PM
The seed industry, one of the largest industries in modern agribusiness, is quickly being swallowed up by the global giants that lead the seed industry. All over the world small seed businesses are being bought out by larger businesses who seek to mass produce their own genetically modified seeds and strengthen their grip on the global seed market. In American agriculture seed giants rule by providing the highest quality seeds to grow the cereal grains in the U.S. produces. But as a result the consumer benefits, farmers can now run farms that aren’t as capital-intensive because of the biotechnology that goes into these seeds. However it is also important to realize that the number of seed companies is dwindling, and that there are only a few large corporations that control all of the seeds that the world needs to grow enough food to survive. I found this article to be very helpful in shedding some light on how the seeds that go into our food is handled, and the truth on how modern agriculture is run.
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Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s

Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Long before the days of celebrity voices calling out directions while you drive, paper-based attempts at mobile mapping generated an intriguing array of proto-GPS systems, including this quirky pair of manual and automated moving map displays.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tagspodcasttransportationmapping, GPS, cartographyhistorical.

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:18 PM

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tags:  podcast, transportation, mapping, GPS, cartography,  historical.