Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Five Tips and Strategies on How to Interpret a Satellite Image

Five Tips and Strategies on How to Interpret a Satellite Image | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.
  1. Look for a scale
  2. Look for patterns, shapes, and textures
  3. Define the colors (including shadows)
  4. Find north
  5. Consider your prior knowledge
Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Lights of Human Activity Shine in NASA's Image of Earth at Night

NASA scientists have just released the first new global map of Earth at night since 2012. This nighttime look at our home planet, dubbed the Black Marble, provides researchers with a unique perspective of human activities around the globe. By studying Earth at night, researchers can investigate how cities expand, monitor light intensity to estimate energy use and economic activity, and aid in disaster response.
Seth Dixon's insight:

NASA scientists are releasing new global maps of Earth at night, providing the clearest yet composite view of the patterns of human settlement across our planet.  You can download the image at a good resolution (8 MB jpg) or at a great resolution (266 MB jpg) to explore at your leisure.  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, images, geospatial.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 20, 2017 5:19 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Spatial Significance
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 2018 10:28 PM
Unit 1
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 13, 2018 4:50 PM

This kind of data also correlated with population density and location.

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Most Young Americans Can’t Pass a Test on Global Affairs—Can You?

Most Young Americans Can’t Pass a Test on Global Affairs—Can You? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new survey finds that even college-educated Americans have a lot to learn about the world around them. Take our quizzes to see how much you know.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a joint initiative from National Geographic and the Council on Foreign Relations, they polled college-educated Americans and (not surprisingly) they found that their global literacy was lacking (see the full report here).  This is why geography courses are needed in all general education programs--you can't be a competent world citizen without understanding the basic geography and global affairs. 

 

Tagsgeography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, National Geographic.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 16, 2016 3:41 PM
Share your insight
Danielle Adams's curator insight, September 19, 2016 10:17 PM
geo 152
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 9:44 PM

Are you smarter than a well educated young American? Take the quiz to see. 

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Map Men: teaching geography through comedy

Map Men: teaching geography through comedy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Mark Cooper-Jones and Jay Foreman, the Map Men, tap into a rich vein of geographical quirks to teach through comedy
Seth Dixon's insight:

Why am I just now finding out about this resource?!?  This new YouTube channel is full of promise for geography teachers...fun, quirky, full of interesting trivia, but most importantly, these videos are rooted in geographic concepts. 

 

Tags: mappingfun, videoAPHG, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:24 AM
Anything to help people know where the Caspian sea resides...or was that Uzbekistan?
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, January 22, 2018 6:21 PM
Funny and full of information!
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 2018 10:29 PM
Unit 1
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The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you

The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How to tell two radically different stories with the same dataset.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Mapping matters, but that doesn't mean that maps convey an objective truth.  They are rhetorical devices used to convince and persuade.  So approach maps critically because while they can convey great spatial patterns, they can conceal patterns just as easily.  

 

Tagsstatisticscartography, visualization, mapping.

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Jose Sepulveda's curator insight, July 29, 2016 6:19 PM
thee precaution should be taken with environmental data published as integrated variable maps   
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 4, 2016 2:12 PM
Maps, like statistics, can tell very different stories using the same information!  Read this for some examples!
Mr Mac's curator insight, August 17, 2017 12:17 AM
Unit 1 - Thematic Maps (use of )
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Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness

Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Pisa tests, an international standard for comparing education systems around the world, could include a new measurement of global skills in the next round of tests in 2018. The OECD, which runs the tests in maths, reading and science, is considering adding another test which would look at how well pupils can navigate an increasingly diverse world, with an awareness of different cultures and beliefs. The OECD's education director Andreas Schleicher explains why there is such a need for new rankings to show young people's competence in a world where globalisation is a powerful economic, political and cultural force.

Education leaders around the world are increasingly talking about the need to teach 'global competences' as a way of addressing the challenges of globalisation."

Seth Dixon's insight:

They define global competence as: "the capacity to analyse global and intercultural issues critically and from multiple perspectives, to understand how differences affect perceptions, judgements, and ideas of self and others, and to engage in open, appropriate and effective interactions with others from different backgrounds on the basis of a shared respect for human dignity".

 

So I guess geography does matter then.  Who knew? 

 

Tagsgeography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Euneos's curator insight, June 2, 2016 6:23 AM
Kansainvälistyminen nousee uudeksi mitattavaksi asiaksi PISA-tutkimuksissa 2018. Miten mahtaa suomalaisten peruskoulujen käydä? Pystyvätkö ne globaalitaidoissa ja kulttuurienvälisessa osaamisessa yltämään samalle tasolle kuin kansainvälistymisessä pitkälle edistyneet Britannia, Hollanti, Belgia tai Tanska. Oma kokemukseni jo 10 vuotta jatkuneesta Intia-yhteistyöstä (http://www.eumind.net) ei ennakoi Suomen kouluille huipputuloksia. Mutta toivotaan parasta.
Jaume Busquets's curator insight, June 4, 2016 12:41 PM
Share your insight
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Eratosthenes calculation for the size of the earth around 240 BC

Seth Dixon's insight:

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge. 

 

Tagsmapping, math, location, historical.

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Geography as a Primary Source

Geography as a Primary Source | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A geographic perspective is a way of looking at and understanding our world. When you view the world through the lens of geography, you are asking who, what, where, when, and how people, places, and things are distributed across the surface of the earth, and why/how they got there. In other words, it means that you are analyzing something with a geographic perspective. The understanding and use of a geographic perspective is critical for decision making skills in the 21st century. Using spatial concepts such as location, region, movement, and scale to help us understand:

  • Interactions - How the world works
  • Interconnections - How systems in our world are connected
  • Implications - How to make well-reasoned decisions"

---@natgeo, Geography as a Primary Source

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographicperspective.

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 27, 2016 8:59 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 2016 9:52 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

is bell's curator insight, March 30, 2016 3:28 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

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Landsat Data Continuity Mission

"This animation portrays how the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) satellite will orbit the Earth 13 times per day at an altitude of 705 km collecting landcover data. With a cross-track width of 185 km, the satellite will completely cover the globe in a 16 day period compiling a total of 233 orbits."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Most remote sensing videos show still images that are animated to give the temporal sequence a video-like quality.  This video shows the 'big picture' of remote sensing, how the Landsat satellites can capture global coverage.

  

Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Awakening the World to the Power of Geography

Awakening the World to the Power of Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"GIS is waking up the world to the power of geography, this science of integration, and…creating a better future," proclaimed Esri founder Jack Dangermond at the 2015 Esri User Conference.

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered the power of geography or the power of GIS, this article from ArcNews is for you.  If you need to convince others of the power of geography, this is for you to strengthen your case.  


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world’s largest dam was created to generate more energy for China’s ever-expanding economy and to increase the interior economic development by increasing the navigability of the river.  The dam also can control downstream flooding and protect important industrial centers such as Shanghai.  This ambitious hydroelectric dam produces the same amount of energy as 18 nuclear power plants.  This dam also displaced over 1 million people as the reservoir flooded properties upstream.  The Three Gorges Dam prevents the nutrient-rich sediments from being deposited downstream; this heightens Chinese farmers’ need for fertilizers, this has led to drought downstream and limits residents’ water access. The dam also disrupted the local ecology (part of the reason the Yangtze River Dolphin went extinct), preventing fish to migrate to upstream breeding grounds. 

For good and ill, the dam has profoundly modified the environment and this video animation from NASA is a powerful demonstration of the changes.       


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, video, land use, environment, environment modify, water, economic, development, China, East Asia, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 10:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 15, 2015 2:27 AM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 11:09 PM
From the animation that NASA has created of the construction of the Three Gorges Dam it is apparent that land has been lost. The Three Gorges Dam was created to generate more energy for Chinas growing economy. It is known as the largest hydroelectric project ever costing around 40 billion dollars and requiring 20,000 workers. There is a good and bad side to the creation of this dam. It has helped Chinas economy grow however to the expense of the people that were displaced because the dam took away land as we can see In the animation. It also effected people downstream negatively as we can see as well because there water supply was depleted. Like most things that take place today the people that benefit from something usually live far away from the problem while those that live closest pay the more costly price.
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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface

Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This ESRI interactive web app uses the "swipe" function to compare 12 places over time.  These locations have experienced significant environmental change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, Aral Sea.

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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 1:46 PM
Wow. This is depressing. I knew of the Aral sea thanks to class, but the others I had no idea. They were so green and lush way back in the day. Now they are dead and seriously in a sad state. There is nothing wrong with development and advancement, but this is just a lot when it comes to impact.
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2018 9:01 AM
This map shows how human activities like farming has shaped the Earth's surface. The example they show is the Aral Sea. It is a 
regional environmental problem. It is located between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. It used to be the world's fourth largest saline lake. Human activities have caused the lake to be almost completely dried up. Over the years, the Aral Sea became polluted with pesticides and chemicals. 


Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 29, 2018 1:51 AM
The Aral Sea is a severe environmental issue in Central Asia. This map that we are looking at shows how human activities such as farming have destroyed a natural wonder. The Aral Sea USED to be the fourth largest saline lake but has dried up. The Aral Sea has five times less volume and is five times more saltier than it once was. This occurred because people surrounding the area used more water and used it more intensely. The soviets thought it would be a good idea to use more water projects such as planting cotton, and rice which are water intense crops. This severely dried up the Sea. The area that the sea once was that is now dry land in uninhabitable because of the levels of salt left behind. As well the rivers that connected to the Aral Sea have either dried out or are on the verge of drying out causing many economic problems for those that depended on that water.
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Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal

Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya.

 

Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

The lidar system fires rapid laser pulses at surfaces and measures how long it takes that light to return to sophisticated measuring equipment. Doing that over and over again lets scientists create a topographical map of sorts. Months of computer modeling allowed the researchers to virtually strip away half a million acres of jungle that has grown over the ruins. What's left is a surprisingly clear picture of how a 10th-century Maya would see the landscape.

Tags: lidar, spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciplesGuatemala, Middle America.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 2018 6:57 PM
Archaeologists are using new high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools to discover Mayan structures that have gone undetected for hundreds of years. This new method for archaeology has proved very successful as well, since tens of thousands of hidden Mayan structures have been detected using these new tools. This helps paint a different picture of what Mayan civilization was really like. For example, archaeologists now believe that the Mayan civilization may have had a population two to three times the size originally estimated and a much larger extension of land than previously thought. At the end of this article, what really made me think was how the Guatemalan jungle once hindered archaeologists from discovering Mayan structures, but now the jungle is seen as useful in preserving these structures over time, so they are not destroyed by people. It seems as though there is still much to learn about the Mayan civilization and their culture.
David Stiger's curator insight, September 24, 2018 1:38 AM
Thanks to new aerial scanning technology, a device called lidar, archaeologists cannot better use geological maps to create three dimensional scans of the earth and uncover buried ruins without moving a rock. Relying on advanced technology to help reveal humanity's past is exciting. Understanding how a civilization lived and functioned, how big it was, its activities, and its achievements brings modern day people closer to the past. 

Geography played a major role in this recent Mayan excavation. The jungles which once prevented archaeologists from seeing what ruins were left actually preserved the ruins by preventing farmers from changing the land. If it were not for the dense areas of jungle, agricultural development would have eroded and destroyed these last remnants of the Mayan civilization. Luckily, farmers avoided these areas and the new technology made available to archaeologists has allowed this once problematic obstacle to become a blessing in disguise and a massive opportunity. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 30, 2018 1:46 AM
Technology is an amazing tool. Using technology to find old temples and buildings is truly astounding. The lidar mapping tools used have created something that would take people years to do. Acres upon acres of forest in Guatemala would have to be mapped and traversed by foot to find any signal of the Maya civilization under the centuries of reclaimed land. If you have ever been to the Mayan temples you would know they are a sight to behold, glorious and awe-inspiring. Technology like this gives us a whole new view of the world and civilizations. Using these could help find many old forgotten cities, not only in Guatemala but all over the world. 
 
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Drones and Geospatial Data

Without sophisticated sensor packages, drones would just be expensive RC airplanes. In this video, Avweb looks at some of the things they can carry.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video gets deep into the specs of sensor packages and the commercial side of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), but it shows how emerging technologies are using and creating geographic data.  This is also a reminder that geography can be incredibly useful in a diverse range of economic sectors and has far-reaching applications in the real world--geography can be incredibly cutting edge.      

 

Tags: geospatial, video, technology.

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Environmental Possibilism Vs. Environmental Determinism

Environmental Possibilism Vs. Environmental Determinism | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Environmental possibilism and determinism are theories, put forth in order to comprehend and understand the role played by the physical environmental conditions in the emergence and progress of any human culture or society in a particular location."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article outlines differences between environmental determinism and environmental possibilism.  Authors such as Robert Kaplan (Revenge of Geography---see a review here) and Jared Diamond (Guns, Germs, and Steel) have been accused of being too environmentally deterministic.  Read Jared Diamond's retort to his critics here. 

 

Questions to Ponder: In what ways does the environment shape human culture(s)?  Why is Jared Diamond critical of skeptics who use the phrase ‘environmental determinism?’Why might some of Kaplan’s ideas as well as the ideas of classical geopolitics be considered ‘environmental determinism?' Can the role of physical geography be overstated in culture, economics or politics? Give three examples when it might be inappropriate. 

 

Tags: environment, religion, cultureunit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 13, 2016 5:42 PM

This article outlines differences between environmental determinism and environmental possibilism.  Authors such as Robert Kaplan (Revenge of Geography---see a review here) and Jared Diamond (Guns, Germs, and Steel) have been accused of being too environmentally deterministic.  Read Jared Diamond's retort to his critics here. 

 

Questions to Ponder: In what ways does the environment shape human culture(s)?  Why is Jared Diamond critical of skeptics who use the phrase ‘environmental determinism?’Why might some of Kaplan’s ideas as well as the ideas of classical geopolitics be considered ‘environmental determinism?' Can the role of physical geography be overstated in culture, economics or politics? Give three examples when it might be inappropriate. 

 

Tags: environment, religion, cultureunit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 12, 2017 8:01 PM
Geographic concepts: Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
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Olympic Races, in Your Neighborhood

Olympic Races, in Your Neighborhood | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What would Olympic races look like if they took place near you? Enter your address below to find out, or keep clicking the green button to explore races that begin in where you live."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I thought I was done with the Olympics, but this just sucked me right back in...in the most geographically relevant way possible.  Scale and distance are important geographic concepts and realizing JUST HOW FAST these Olympians are on the TV can be deceptive when they are paired up with other great Olympians.  Seeing how far in your own neighborhood you would have to go to beat the 400m champion--or the 5000m.  Since the United States doesn't use the metric system, this map is a good way to contextualize these measurements and try to run the race in your own backyard.  Let the Backyard Games begin!!

 

Tags: mappingfunscaledistance, sport, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.  

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ringacrux's comment, August 27, 2016 6:14 AM
Remarkable...!!
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Petra, Jordan: Huge monument found 'hiding in plain sight'

Petra, Jordan: Huge monument found 'hiding in plain sight' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Two archaeologists, who recently published their findings in the American Schools of Oriental Research, used Google Earth satellite images and drone photography to identify the outline of an enormous monument buried beneath sand and time at the UNESCO World Heritage site in Jordan."  --Motherboard

Seth Dixon's insight:

When in the Mexican state of Veracruz as a grad student, I saw a startling mountain covered by the dense tropical rain forest; this mountain had a consistent slope with hard angles.  I was awestruck to realize that it was an uncovered (but not undiscovered) pyramid and I wondered just how many archeological sites are waiting to be unearthed. 

 

Why is a geographer an important member of an interdisciplinary team? This discovery shows that spatial thinking, geographic tools, and a keen eye for usually patterns in unexpected places are critical for many disciplines and fields of research.

 

Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, MiddleEast, Jordan, googleunit 1 GeoPrinciples.  

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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 29, 2018 8:38 PM
(Middle East) Using modern technology, archaeologists have discovered a new monument hidden underground in Petra. The find, dated around 150 B.C., is thought to be a ceremonial site with two platforms, pottery. columns, and a staircase carved out of stone. It is amazing that there are still new finds like this in the 21st century, but the history of the Middle East is so incredibly old, with so many extinct civilizations, that archaeologists will probably keep making new breakthroughs.
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 9:40 PM
Physical geography can be really cool as understanding the current land helps to also understand the past. Researchers finding new monuments like this in Petra shows the importance of knowing the land around you, or someplace important like where the UNESCO World Heritage Site. 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 2018 10:30 PM
Unit 1
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'Sedated by software': No one knows how to read maps anymore, experts say

'Sedated by software': No one knows how to read maps anymore, experts say | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Royal Institute of Navigation are concerned about the nation's cartographical know-how and have suggested schools start teaching basic navigation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Today, many are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, location.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 9, 2016 6:11 AM

I agree !!! and it is fun

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 5:41 AM

Today, many are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, location.


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Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

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Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 2016 4:32 PM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 11:25 AM

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

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The Evolution of the World Map

The Evolution of the World Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map/timeline takes users (shared before but the URL has been updated here) around the world through the major events representing the expansion of human knowledge.  Admittedly, this is represents knowledge from a Eurocentric perspective, but that is somewhat appropriate in this instance since that was the largest store of spatial knowledge as this global information coalesced.  Users can visualize the coordination of absolute space and realize the actions undertaken that shifted geography from its predecessor, cosmology.  Each achievement came through intensive exploration and the detailed mapping of those endeavors.

 

Tagshistoricalmappingcartography, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Man of the world

Man of the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh...In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Latin America and Europe, but given that intellectually people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects 'geography.'  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).    


Tags:  historicalbiogeography, unit 1 Geoprinciples, book reviews.

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How Modern Cartographers Marry Math and Art

How Modern Cartographers Marry Math and Art | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Old maps get a lot of love, and with good reason—with their sea monsters and sheer craftsmanship, they can transport us through both space and time. But although they lack fold-mark furrows, there’s something to be said for new maps, too. Leafing through Mind the Map, a stunning new book from Gestalten, it’s hard not to think we’re living in the middle of a map renaissance, a time when cartographers and illustrators have good design on their minds and satellite data at their fingertips. This partnership between math and art allows for representations that are not only technically accurate, but also have a sense of a place."


Tags: mapping, visualization, cartographyunit 1 Geoprinciples.

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New Message's curator insight, October 31, 2015 10:08 PM

The vulnerability of coastal areas so evident! #SeaLevelRise

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 10:36 AM

Map: art and math

www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:38 AM

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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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Why GIS in Education Matters

Why GIS in Education Matters | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I have recently updated a document entitled “Why GIS in Education Matters” and have placed it online.  It represents my attempt to provide the most compelling and important reasons to teach and learn with Geographic Information Systems in a concise document that takes up no more than both sides of a single page.  While we have discussed other documents, messages, lessons, and videos in this blog over the years that are tailored to specific educational levels, needs, and content areas, this document contains the “essentials” that I have found resonate with the widest group of educators.  These essentials include critical thinking, career pathways, spatial thinking, the whys of where, asking good questions, sustainability and green technology, and mapping changes over space and time."


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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