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In stunning decision, Britain votes to leave the E.U.

In stunning decision, Britain votes to leave the E.U. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The country opted to become the first ever to leave the 28-member bloc in a result that will send economic and political shockwaves across the globe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The foundations of the European Union have their historical roots in World War II.  To ensure that European countries stop attacking each other, they knit their economies together and cooperated more on political and economic policies.   

The UK has narrowly voted to leave the European Union (52%-48%).  The Brexit (Britain + Exit) was expected to be close, but shows discontent with London.  The ‘Remain’ campaign dominated in London, Scotland and Northern Ireland while the ‘Leave’ campaign found its strength across England and Wales (see maps). 

The fallout of this vote is big and far-reaching.  The first global reaction was financial panic as numerous stock exchanges plummeted.  UK Prime Minister David Cameron will resign.  Already Spain is calling for joint control of Gibraltar (which they’ve wanted anyway) and using this as an opportunity to advance a Spanish agenda.  Many in Scotland chose to stay in the UK in part because they wanted Scotland to remain in the EU.  Another referendum on Scottish Independence feels eminent at this point.       

Still confused?  Here are answers to 9 frequently asked questions about the Brexit as well as a good overview from on the economic issues from the Economist.

   

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup

Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Argentina and England are unlikely to meet at the World Cup finals, however their rivalry was reignited at the weekend when the Argentine national side posed behind a banner claiming the Falkland Islands belong to the South American country. Ahead of their warm-up match with Slovenia in Buenos Aires, the team displayed the message in support of the country's claims over the sovereignty of the islands in the South Atlantic, which are a British Overseas Territory.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Cup can make things interesting when nationalistic fervor becomes politicized and moves to issues off the pitch.  Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  Like Gibraltar, the Falklands are British Oversees Territories, ones that Margaret Thatcher was willing to fight Agrentina to maintain;  Argentina still claims Las Malvinas as their territory.  For a great teaching resource on this issue, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE 2013 (sign up to attend NCGE 2014 here).  


Tags: Argentinasport, bordersgeopolitics, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:17 PM

Sempre a geopolítica...  Malvinas.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting for me, because I am a student in Geography 200, but I also love soccer, and the English National Team is one of my favorite sides.  I think it is interesting how in the World Cup, the Argentines took an opportunity of being on the world stage to claim that the Falkland Islands, or the "Las Malvinas", belong to their country and not their bitter soccer enemy, England.  I think that had this banner been displayed before and England v Argentina final, the game would have had an explosive atmosphere, especially since the Argentines are also rivals of Brazil.  I think it is interesting how geo-political issues can play themselves out on the pitch of the "beautiful game".  This fact shows that soccer is indeed the "World's Game".  As I stated before, I would have loved to see the passion this would have inspired before an England-Argentina game.  To this day, England prefers Portugal over Argentina in soccer, probably because of their checkered history.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Geographic data can be so beautiful...you've got to watch this.  I wish I have seen this when I wrote my National Geographic article on how container ships are transforming the global economy.  

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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:59 AM
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