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Curated by Seth Dixon
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Feuding Over Food

Feuding Over Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the Caucasus, culinary nationalism is an extension of the region's long-simmering disputes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

"There is perhaps nothing more closely bound up with one's national identity than food. Specific local dishes are often seen as the embodiment of various cultures and many nations promote their food as a celebration of national identity. Sometimes, however, a country's cuisine can also be used to highlight national rivalries." 


This opening paragraph nicely shows how cultural traditions from a similar cultural hearth may have much in common.  However, since these groups are neighbors, the geopolitical relationship may be strained despite the cultural commonalities. 


Tags: food, culture, unit 3 culture.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:36 PM

This is a great addition to include for my World Food Problems course this semester.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:25 AM

A nations food is often used to celebrate their national identity but it can also be used to highlight national rivalries. For example the Czechs reffer to their Slovak cousins as Halusky after one of their traditonal dishes. Culinary flashpoints can also arise when nations claim the same dishes as their own.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:30 PM

Azerbaijanis, Turks, and Armenian share a lot of the same foods. Instead of enjoying the similarities and cultural nationalism, they are disputing. Eat, drink and be  merry?

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

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Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Mount Dixon Explodes!

Mount Dixon Explodes! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An initial analysis of the Mount Dixon landslide in New Zealand on Monday
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some great images (and a post-landslide helicopter flight video) of the massive landslide that occurred Jan 21, 2013.  The rockslide extends over 3 km, with an elevation change of approximately 800 meters.  This is an excellent example to help students visualize mass wasting, alpine glaciation and erosion in general.  While the mountain didn't explode strictly speaking, I couldn't help but love the headline "Mount Dixon explodes!"    


Tags: New Zealand, physical, geomorphology, erosion.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:58 PM

Just an incredible sight to see.  The helicopter video is truly an amazing must see for anyone.  Just to imagine what it would be like to be there when it happened.  The speed at whcih the landslide moved plus the sounds it must have made would have been a once and a lifetime even, but if you were that close when it happened, it might be the end of your lifetime...what a way to go!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:49 AM

Mount Dixon's landslide is due to the mountain itself being unstable. The landslide pattern is normal in retrospect to other landslides that have happened over the years. The before and after pictures are a clear depiction of the landslide path from top to bottom.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:13 PM

There was a large landslide on Mount Dixon in New Zealand and this article not only explains what may have happened, there is also a video that you can watch to try and understand it better. This landslide had a large fall height and a long distance that it fell out from. The landslide fell on the west side of the mountain and removed a big section from the top. These photographs are miraculous to see and give you a better perspective of the fall and the direction of the landslide. The impact removed all of the snow and ice that was on the surface and the slide appeared to have ran energy by where it stopped. 

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Refugees from Syria

Refugees from Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Syrian refugees who have fled the conflict and crossed the borders hasn't ceased to increase.
Seth Dixon's insight:

UNICEF workers have stated: "More than 600,000 have fled the conflict in Syria and registered as refugees. The number of Syrians who have left without registering is unknown but is likely to be hundreds of thousands. We do know, however, that children make up around half the number of refugees and that is certainly no way for any child to live their childhood."


Tags: Syria, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:16 PM

The ongoing military conflicts in Syria have caused a significant refugee problem. Refugees are evacuating Syria and entering its geographically close neighbors, including Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt.

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Russian Orthodox believers mark Epiphany with icy plunge

Russian Orthodox believers mark Epiphany with icy plunge | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of members of the Russian Orthodox Church marked Epiphany on January 19 with a dip in freezing waters blessed by a cleric. Epiphany is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus Christ and the...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the photography and photo galleries of this cultural event are breathtaking--literally for those taking the plunge.  Russians cut the ice in the shape of a cross and bath in water that is blessed and considered holy.  This appears to be a religious tradition that is particularly adapted to the environmental conditions of the religious adherents (since it appears that the extreme climate plays a critical role in the activity).  Part of the practice involves sacrifice; the colder the swim, the greater the manifestation of religious devotion.    


Tags: Russia, religion, culture

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:18 PM

The fact that these people are jumping into pretty much frozen water in January is insane. I know we do a polar plunge here in RI, but I do not know of anyone who completely gets wet, I always knew of people just going in up to their knees or waist. Anyway, they obviously do not do it for a charity reason though, they do it to show religious dedication and proving themselves to the Russian Orthodox church. What baffles me most though, is since Russia is the largest country in the world and cold travels harder over larger masses of land, geographically, they are way low in the single digits and negatives while they are doing this. At least here our water is not already pre frozen and we could be in the 20s to 30s in January. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:30 PM

all i could think about while reading this article was cultural diffusion, this is a great example of how cultures spread and gets adapted from place to place. here in the united states, also more specifically in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, you can take part in a similar event called the penguin plunge.

Christina Caruso's curator insight, March 31, 3:47 PM
On January 19th, thousands of members of the Russian Orthodox Church marked the epiphany by going into the freezing water blessed by a cleric and it is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus Christ.  
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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding

Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A digital chart used by the minesweeper USS Guardian to navigate Philippine waters misplaced the location of a reef by about eight nautical miles, and may have been a significant factor when the ship drove hard aground on the reef on Jan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Accurate, reliable data is crucial for countless applications. 

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Mark Trinidad's comment, January 24, 2013 4:29 PM
strong magnetic current??
Deborah Vane's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:45 AM

Digital gone wrong. 

Mark Trinidad's comment, January 30, 2013 5:26 PM
well they are already warned by PCG but they have their own water line..
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What if Greece quits the euro?

What if Greece quits the euro? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Greek exit from the euro has become a bomb fizzling at the heart of the eurozone. What could happen if it explodes?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is still all speculation, but this speculation is grounded in the very real possibility that Greece may leave the Eurozone.  This one possible scenario would have a profound ripple effect throughout the European Union and beyond.  This interactive explores each of these 8 possible results.  


Tags: Greece, Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic



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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:05 PM

Money controls everything. Because parliament has to make some budget cuts, money must be spent elsewhere. Because of this, Greece leaving the euro could lead to a downward spiral including a sovereign debt crisis, a recession and political backlash. Should Greece keep the euro?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:02 AM

This article explains eight possible outcomes of Greece leaving the Euro Zone. None of them favorable for Europe, except maybe the UK which could possibly borrow more cheaply. For the rest of Europe, the results are either increased burdens for the more economically strong EZ nations like Germany, or a domino effect which accelerates the decline of the struggling economies of countries like Italy and Spain.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:09 PM

If Greek were to quit/ be forced out of the Euro, according to this article, would not bode well for the country. As the graph suggests, Greece would experience multiple consequences if their vote fail then Greece will possibly suffer a government shutdown due to the debt they find themselves in.

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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is much to glean from Martin Luther King's famous I Have a Dream speech as a fantastic rhetorical device. This speech has a profound impact on the the psyche of the America culture and it has endured as a pivotal moment in history.  As we celebrate his life and legacy this Monday, it is an appropriate time to contemplate that the ending of segregation (a spatial division of races) has reshaped the United States. 


Many streets in the United States bear the name "Martin Luther King Jr." to memorialize both the man and the Civil Rights movement.  This streets, as this YouTube video suggests, are often in poor, crime-ridden and violent neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.  This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video). 


Questions to ponder: If Martin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  What does the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, January 20, 2013 10:38 AM

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 2014 7:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.

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A Review of Jared Diamond's "The World Until Yesterday"

A Review of Jared Diamond's "The World Until Yesterday" | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Should we look to traditional societies to help us tweak our lives? Wade Davis takes issue with the whole idea
Seth Dixon's insight:

Jared Diamond is famous for his work in writing Guns, Germs and Steel as well as Collapse.  His latest work, The World Until Yesterday, he encourages modern readers to examine the traditional societies for insights on how to improve the human condition.  In this book review by Wade Davis, he critiques this approach and suggests that we should see indigenous societies as reminders that our modern lifestyle is not the only way.


Tags: book reviews, folk cultures, indigenous.

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:21 PM

As a member of the Western world where technology and modernity are at the forefront of the way we live, the author of the article made a refreshing point. I quote, “The other peoples of the world are not failed attempts at modernity, let alone failed attempts to be us.” This quote was incredibly interesting because far too often our society views others against our standards. Yet, as the author points out, who is really to say this is the correct way of living? I personally don’t have an answer, but I do admire the work of Boas mentioned in this article as he actually tried to live within a culture and judge it without prior “prejudice.” Yet, most people aren’t about to live in another society just to better understand them. Furthermore, with our world becoming increasingly interconnected more and more information becomes disseminated and more technology and modernity occur. So those who don’t partake are seen as alien. Now as Diamond’s newest book tried to show, different isn’t bad. To Diamond, some aspects of more traditional indigenous people are actually better than ours. Unlike the author, I don’t find this offensive and maybe I don’t because I am taking into account the forces of globalization. The author, was offensive because Diamond should have realized that living another way is the point. Not that blending the two should even be considered. Yet, in a world where everyone is becoming so interconnected, I don’t think purely isolated cultures can stand. Furthermore, nor do I think it is bad to pull the good from one culture and apply it to another. What I find more disturbing is the fact that Diamond isn’t truly an expert on any region outside of Guinie. So, honestly what authority does he have to be advising on those matters? Yet again we see the good and bad of globalization, one doesn’t have to move outside of ones out area to obtain second hand information (enough to write a book). Yet, one can at least look at the information to see that other cultures do have value and can stand up for those good aspects (even if it may be a superficial understand) as it does give food for thought. In this instance, I think what Diamond did was good because it reminds the people who overlook tradition to pause and see there is good.   

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City & Country Ground Image Quiz

City & Country Ground Image Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Can you use physical and cultural geography clues to match the ground photograph with its location? Identify the 10 cities and 10 countries. In so doing, you are thinking spatially and considering language, culture, climate, landforms, land use, transportation methods, etc. to determine the correct answers."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This quiz and others like it are great ways to get students utilize all the information available in a photograph and really plumb the depths of their knowledge about places.  


Tags: games, spatial, landscape.

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The School Aranda's curator insight, January 21, 2013 6:00 AM

Should be great for FCE speaking speculation. . . .

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A Mysterious Patch Of Light

A Mysterious Patch Of Light | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This patch of light is baffled me since clusters of light on this image almost always are connected to high levels of urbanization and North Dakota has no major population center of that magnitude.  This is the Bakken formation, a new oil and gas field that is producing over 600,000 barrels a day.  The lights are oil rigs that are lit up at night, but even more because many gas flares are burning leading locals to call the area "Kuwait on the Prairie."  Oil men from far and wide are flocking to the rural, lightly populated area raising rents sky-high.  This has caused a huge localized gender imbalance, changing the demographic and cultural character of the region because of the drastic the economic and environmental shifts in the area (see the national gender balance here).  This is a great reminder that the physical and human geographies of a region are fully intermeshed one with another. 


Tags: resources, gender, environment, economic, migration.

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Heidi Zumbrun Bjerke's comment, February 12, 2013 9:52 PM
Use google earth and you can compare the two images.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's comment, February 12, 2013 11:55 PM
that's an excellent idea, especially to have students suggest what the light might be in the photo. The question is , is the bright light a one time occurrence or does it continue?J
Mary Rack's comment, February 13, 2013 6:08 AM
I'm having trouble installing GoogleEarth on my iMac. Looking forward to the comparison. Big adjustment after years in the PC world.
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Iconic Landscapes

Iconic Landscapes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Time lapse video compilation Civilization: Part I - Europe by professional photographer Dominic Boudreault. Shot in England, France, Spain and Italy.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a gorgeous video that was very intelligently constructed.  The title 'civilization' coupled with the images of iconic architecture, makes me think differently and question how we conceptualize the ideas of civilization and society. 


Tags: landscape, historical, Europe, time lapse.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:11 PM

Europe is such a beautiful place where its landscapes, architecture, and waterways have shaped its future. This video shows the beauty of the towns and how everything in is has remembrances of the past. This video is a definite must see!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:33 AM

I found this very stirring.  To see the old and new buildings side by side makes one think about what came before and how the past influences the future.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 6:03 PM

This video of iconic landscapes displays beautiful and historic architecture throughout Europe. This video allows the viewer to see these great areas of Europe. I have a great deal of respect for those who built things such as the Colosseum in Rome years ago, as it is amazing that some of these historic buildings are still standing today. 

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love this time-lapse animation of all the county and state-level boundary changes in United States history.  Would you like to see this in greater detail?  Would you want to download the data and create your own visualization of this?  The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries has all of this data as GIS shapefiles, Google Earth KMZ files and PDFs for the whole country as well as for each individual state.  This project sponsored by The Newberry and the National Endowment for the Humanities has tremendous potential for use in the classroom for history and geography teachers alike.  


Tags: historical, USA, borders, time lapse, mapping, edtech.

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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.

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wereldvak's curator insight, January 26, 2013 5:28 AM

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
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Historical Interactive Topographic Map of Switzerland

Historical Interactive Topographic Map of Switzerland | Geography Education | Scoop.it


 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent interactive topographic map of Switzerland with great detail at a variety of scales with historical layers from 1938 to the present. 


Tags: Switzerland, historical, mapping.

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's no secret that Japan's population is aging and can not replace itself.  Since it is not a destination country for migrants, this is going to have serious economic ramifications as the percentage of the Japanese population over 60 is expected to rise above 40% over the course of this next generation.  Given the harsh statements by the new Japanese finance minister, it's a huge political concern (although a difficult one mention in campaigns).  Some have already questioned Japan's ability to survive this demographic implosion as adult diapers are now a bigger moneymaker in Japan than children's diapers.

 

Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia.

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Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:41 AM

What this government minister said is repugnant, but his comments strike directly at the most serious issue facing Japan. The Japanese population has become to old to sustain itself. Their are not enough younger people in Japan to sustain future generations of Japanese society. When a society fails to reproduce, it dies out. Japan may be facing extinction in a few generations to come. The increased strain on the government of Japan, will eventually kill it. A state can not support a majority elderly population. The coasts of medical care would drown the government in debt and financial ruin. Many European nations are facing a similar demographic time bomb. If this problem is not corrected, there is a good chance that both European and Japanese society will die out.

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Census Data Mapper

Census Data Mapper | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This web mapping application provides users with a simple interface to view, customize, save and print thematic maps of the United States, using data from the 2010 Census.  The beta version contains a set of 2010 Census data relating to age and sex, population and race, and family and housing in the United States by county or equivalent entity." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This month the U.S. Census Bureau has released the beta version of a very nice online mapping tool to display the 2010 data.  The mapper will create PDF versions of any map produced online (file sizes from 20-55KB) and the user can export the raw data to Excel.  While the user is more limited in how to display the data than they would using a GIS, this is a simple way to explore some of the basic census information.


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, cartography.


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Jen-ai's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:11 PM

mmm data. This tool is really useful for anyone planning on servicing an area with grown food. You can see the demographics of your chosen geographical area quickly.

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is Lake Hillier, located on a small island south of Western Australia.  Around the world there are many pink lakes; most of them can attribute their hue to their high salinity composition.  Some algaes that thrive in salt water produce organic pigments with a reddish/pinkish coloration.  This particular lake's coloration is a mystery.  If you any additional information, feel free to share in in the comments section below.  

   

Tags: water, physical, images, Australia.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 1:17 PM
As seen in many sea salt production facilities, the brine can often turn a pink color due to the high salinity and presence of certain bacteria. While no single cause can b attributed to this lake's pink hue, its stunning color has captivated all who have come across it. 
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The Changing Geography of Quinoa

The Changing Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition
Seth Dixon's insight:

Quinoa was once a traditional Andean grain that few outside of South America consumed, but it has quickly become a staple among the health-conscious in developed countries in recent years.  Dieticians and nutritional experts give it their seal of approval because it is a low-fat starch that is high in protein and filled with amino acids.  This rapid adoption of quinoa in high-priced whole food stores has changed the economics of quinoa dramatically.  Peruvian and Bolivian farmers are selling at high prices with huge global demand.  Local consumers who have traditionally relied on this crop however, now have to pay triple the price to eat quinoa, causing some to question the ethics of quinoa consumption.  A simple change in cultural eating habits in one part of the world can have some major impacts on the economy and agriculture of another region.  


Tags: food, agriculture, South America, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:12 PM

This is an example of the harmful effect of globalization, those who grew quinoa for food are now forced to ship away their food source leading to starvation and a slew of other issues. Those in the west with their obsession with "Super Foods" have without realizing it driven up the price of this grain to the extend that those who relied upon it as their staple crop can no longer afford to eat it themselves.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 3, 2015 12:54 PM

I remember walking into Panera Bread one morning a few months back. In the doorway, they had a sign that read, "Now serving Quinoa Oatmeal." I thought to myself, "What the hell is a Key-noah?" Now, it seems I can't go anywhere without hearing about this grain.

 

Touted as the super grain, Quinoa has been used for centuries as a source of sustenance for the dwellers of the Andes. But what happens when a traditional food source, only able to grow in a small region is suddenly desired by large parts of America and Europe? Supply and demand has kicked in and if it's more profitable to eat something else and sell your crop, then I'd imagine most folks would do just that like they are in the Andes. The problem with selling your main source of nutrition is that when you aren't eating it, you're not getting the nutrients you normally got. Is stripping a people of their ancestral food source and malnutrition worth it for a bowl of oatmeal at Panera? 

Christina Caruso's curator insight, February 9, 6:25 PM
Quinoa became popular about 7 years ago in the US. It was mostly used in Bolivia and Peru. Its a crop grown in South America.
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Geography of Sports League Alignment

Geography of Sports League Alignment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The NBA has the cleanest map of all the sports leagues.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sports league have historically used geographic references to describe their league, conference or divisions (This was just one of the many reasons I was so appalled that San Diego State was going to join the Big East.  Thankfully that plan was stymied).  To have successful rivalries, teams often play up local proximity of fan bases (Yankees/Red Sox, Duke/North Carolina, Michigan/Ohio State) to add intensity to the on-field action.  Given that teams and fans travel, the logistics make regionally based division economically prudent.  This map (and the full set of major professional leagues in North America) shows that the NBA has the most geographically consistent divisions.   


Tags: sport, mapping, regions.

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Inverted Earth

Seth Dixon's insight:

These maps were purposefully designed to break all the cartographic conventions and consequently conceal as much as they reveal.  When land is colored blue, what happens in the mind of the map viewer?  Why is psychology important in how we design maps?     


Tags: images, mapping, cartography.

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Dewayne Lawson's comment, January 19, 2013 9:19 PM
very cool!
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When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world?

When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography contributes to a sense of identity on a personal level and collectively as a nation. So what does it mean when we don’t know where Africa or Europe is on a map?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article by the chair of the Canadian Council for Geographic Education shows how the decline in student's geographic knowledge is linked to it's erosion within the curriculum.  In an era of globalization, geographic knowledge and spatial thinking becomes all the more essential. 


Tags: geography education, geo-inspiration.


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Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Emergency and Disaster Information Service | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Map of the World, in real time with natural disaster information.

"This is a Emergency and Disasters Information and monitoring services. Hosted by National Association of Radio-distress signalling and Infocommunications.

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Stores reject 'wasted food' claims

Stores reject 'wasted food' claims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Britain's biggest supermarkets defend their practices after a report suggested that up to half of the world's food is thrown away.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The mechanization of the all stages of food production has lead to some strange practices.  The geometry of a food matters for a mechanized processing and also for the aesthetics at the grocery store which leads to slightly misshaped vegetables and fruits are routinely discarded.  There is waste throughout the system, from 'field to fork.'  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Tourism's comment, January 16, 2013 11:29 PM
thanks for the info