Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

Via Tony Hall
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

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Tony Hall's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:31 PM

This is a very thought provoking article. I like seeing the established conventions challanged. I also like the conversations around the sense of superiority possed by the Northern Hemisphere. Enjoy!

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's comment, May 24, 2013 11:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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Exploring farms from above

Exploring farms from above | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Stunning gallery of 15 images depicting agricultural landscapes.  Shown above are cut flower fields in Carlsbad, California circa 1989."

Seth Dixon's insight:

"Aerial photographer Alex MacLean estimates he has spent about 6,000 hours in the sky photographing American farms.  His unique perspective depicts the dramatically changing agricultural landscape in the U.S., something he has been drawn to since he started flying nearly 40 years ago.  'I’ve been photographing agricultural lands since I started flying, in the early 1970s,' he says. 'I was drawn to the aesthetics of farmland, in part because of its natural response to environmental conditions, climates, soils and topography…A lot of what I photograph is through discovery of seeing crops, seeing patterns.' 


Tags: agriculture, landscape, images.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:28 AM

These are really beautiful and interesting, but I wish  photos could also reveal what substances are used on the land: fertilizers, pest killers, etc. I will go to his site and see if he addresses that. 

Mary Rack's comment, May 23, 2013 10:35 AM
MacLean's http://www.alexmaclean.com/ is a rich treasure trove of beauty and information! I could lose myself in it for the rest of the day. I recommend it to all thoughtful people.
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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:
Seth Dixon's insight:

Also, see this is a nice interactive map feature that shows all of the deadly tornadoes in the U.S. since 1950.  

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 11:29 AM

Seeing the damage done to all of these homes and communities is devastating. You see all the destruction in different areas on TV, but looking at it from a maps perspective is so much different. Seeing how it was and then looking at it after is unreal. The damage that is done to so much land is saddening. Then to look at the map of all the tornadoes since 1950 was eye opening. I never realized that there was so many tornadoes that occurred throughout the U.S since 1950. It was also shocking to see that there had been a huge tornado in the Boston area that took peoples lives. Usually when I think about tornadoes I don't think about them in Boston, Connecticut, or New York. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:37 PM

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores
Seth Dixon's insight:

For a the full lesson on how access to clean drinking water and human well-being are connected on the Indonesian island of Flores, visit World Vision Australia.  On a related note, this article from the Guardian discusses the trouble of securing clean drinking water in Bangladesh.   


Tags: Indonesiawater, development.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:48 PM

This is a pretty sad short documentary, it tells of the diseases and the amount of people that go without water. Just to get water women will have to go to a well and walk a couple hours through a forest. Sometimes the well can be dry. The women and children are affected greatly. The women have neck and knee pain from the weight of the water they are carrying and the children are always sick from the poor drinking water so they are constantly missing school.  With permission, the people of the villages were able to engineer a freshwater system that ran through the different villages, a total of 27 kilometers. This made life significantly better than what it used to be. The one thing that really surprised me is that the villagers opted out to pay $120 a year to neighboring villages to keep the water clean and allow them use. 

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AP Human Geography: 2013 Free Response Questions


Via Mr. David Burton
Seth Dixon's insight:

You can dowload the 2013 FRQs or any previously released FRQs on the AP Human Geography College Board website. 

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Baby Name Regions?

Baby Name Regions? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Social Security Administration this week released its list of 2012’s most popular baby names by state, and maybe explained why there are so many Jacobs and Sophias in your kids’ schools. Do you see your kids’ names here?"

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Republicans and Millennials Are More Likely to Find Syria on a Map

Republicans and Millennials Are More Likely to Find Syria on a Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
45 percent think the U.S. should intervene, but only half can identify the country.
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World Languages Quiz

World Languages Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A quick fun quiz on languages from around the world. If you consider yourself a bit of linguist, this quiz will be 'nada' problem for you!
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Prepping for the AP Human Geography exam

Prepping for the AP Human Geography exam | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Planning to take the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam from the College Board? Try these five suggestions for review."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is last minute, but every little bit can help.  Good luck tomorrow!


Tag: APHG.

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Geography Education | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is incredibly busy, but the best elements of this interactive map are the links to YouTube videos of particular accents and pronunciation examples.  It's not winning any cartographic prizes but the links make the map it worth perusing given its rich detail.  See also this article about the map from GeoCurrents.   


Tags: language, North America.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

Alex Smiga's curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:47 AM

Looky thurrr

 

Funky American English dialects 

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?


Seth Dixon's insight:

I present this map (hi-res) without any context to my students and ask the question: is this statement true?  How can we ascertain the truthfulness of this claim?  What fact would we need to gather?  This exercise sharpens their critical thinking skills and harnesses the assorted bits of regional information that they already have, and helps them evaluate the statement.

The answers to these questions can be found here.

 

Tags: density, social media, East Asia, South Asia.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this Scholar's Online video, Jennifer Fluri briefly answers this question: How has Afghanistan's geography affected its history?  This video nicely shows how contested international disputes have geographic dimensions to them.  The very borders of Afghanistan were created out of geopolitical maneuverings.


Tags: Afghanistanborders, politicalculture, Central Asia, historical, colonialism. 

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:15 AM

Afghanistan's current borders are the result of political maneuvering between empires. Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor is a result of this political maneuvering. The corridor was created in order to prevent the Russian Empire and British India from sharing a common border. While many afghans may decry the notion, Afghanistan has been shaped by foreign influence. The same can be said for almost every other nation on the globe. Almost all borders are determined by some from of political maneuvering. Our borders with Mexico and Canada have been determined through treaties and wars.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 12:24 PM

As I have learned more about the world, it's been interesting to see how arbitrary national borders can sometimes be. I think we are taught in school to associate "nations" with "nationalism," and although that is generally the case for most industrialized nations (whose citizens generally feel they are "nationals" within their own borders), it is not always true for the rest of the world. We see this in the numerous ethnic disputes in African nations, in the violent Yugoslav wars in Europe, and today with the Kurd uprising in Syria and Iraq- we see ill-defined borders that do not meet the needs of their peoples, nations that do not encompass the same sentiments of nationalism. As a result, we see indifference between these various peoples at best, or open conflict between varying ethnic and ideological groups at worst. Afghanistan as we know it today is not the result of self-determination or a sense of nationalism, but geopolitical jockeying between Russia and the United Kingdom. It is not a nation, but a political buffer.

As a result, Afghanistan does not act as a single nation- it may have a central government, but that government is incredibly weak, and people in remote areas often do not even know of its existence. Afghanistan is a series of small city-states and even more isolated settlements clumped together behind arbitrarily drawn lines, living their lives in much the same manner their ancestors did 1,000 years ago. This has made the mountainous, isolated regions of the nation a haven for terrorists and religious extremism, posing a serious issue in the region that, despite billions of dollars and a decade of fighting, the US has been unable to find a solution for. Divided amongst itself, Afghanistan is a nation in name only, something that the West likes to place on the map because of a dispute between two global powers nearly 2 centuries ago.

 

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 15, 3:28 PM
People often wonder why Afghanistan is so conflict ridden and point fingers at one thing or another.  This video sheds some light on why Afghanistan actually is what it is today.  The country did not get to chose its own borders and so cultural groups were thrown together that may not necessarily like to be associated.  The modern borders were set up as a buffer zone between the Soviet Union and the British Empire in India and Pakistan, which is why there is one small land strip known as the Wahkan Corridor sticking off of Afghanistan.  The border between modern-day Pakistan and Afghanistan was set up in the late 1800s in order to stop British troops from invading Afghan territory and prevent the Afghans from assisting Pakistani rebels. This explains why the present borders of Afghanistan exist, but the establishment of these borders doesn’t seem to be very fair to Afghanistan, who were basically forced by imperial powers to comply.  Another imperial power that changed Afghanistan was the Persian Empire, hundreds of years ago.  The Persian influence is more cultural.  Afghanistan’s New Year was adopted from the Persian New Year so they’re celebrated on the same day.  Additionally one of the recognized languages in Afghanistan is a dialect of Farsi, which the Persian language.  All of this predates any of the influences of Islam, which shows what a hodgepodge of cultures Afghanistan has become.  This video briefly touches upon American involvement in the region during the Cold War, which escalated tensions even farther and left behind both Soviet and American influences.  The geographical changes that have occurred in the region for centuries has shaped Afghanistan’s history.
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Geography Teachers Association of Victoria – GTAV

Geography Teachers Association of Victoria – GTAV | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The GTAV is the professional subject association serving geography teachers in the State of Victoria, Australia.
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A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Prof. Arnon Sofer sets out the link between drought, Assad’s civil war, and the wider strains in the Middle East; Jordan and Gaza are also in deep trouble, he warns
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article and the concepts in it were recently echoed by Thomas Friedman in the New York Times; some seem the linkages that he is making between population growth and drought with war and conflict as being environmentally deterministic while others think that it is appropriately taking the geographic factors into consideration.  Conflicts over water can erupt, but how much of the conflict can be attributed these factors?  What do you think? 


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, water, environment,

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:25 AM

The article explains how population growth, climate change, drought, and water shortages could have contributed to the rise of war in Syria. This is an interesting interpretation, one which certainly could have been a contributing factor, but not all the Arab Spring can be attributed to water shortages so it is not a direct cause. The water shortages in Syria and a lack of government response certainly could have fanned flames which already existed due to an oppressive regime and regional conflicts. Climate change gets a lot of attention for the potential damage it could do to the environment, but I had not given much thought to the conflicts it could cause between nations and peoples.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:22 PM

Egypt may be the next country to be in deep trouble. With so many militant attacks coming out of Egypt to being with there is no surprise that the Middle East thinks it will be next on the list.

Pamela Hills's curator insight, July 18, 2014 8:37 AM

 A world at war and hot spots are growing with people caught in middle <3

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Mass Wasting

Mass Wasting | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

A steep slope and unstable ground in this picture from Egypt results in mass wasting and the 'flow' of the sand down the slope.  Sand dunes are often formed more by aeolian (wind) processes, making this image especially noteworthy.

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Claudia M. Reder's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:30 PM

Strange happenings.

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NWS - National Mosaic Enhanced Radar Image: Full Resolution Loop

NWS - National Mosaic Enhanced Radar Image: Full Resolution Loop | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Latest weather radar images from the National Weather Service
Seth Dixon's insight:

With all the tornado warnings, damage and concern, this map shows the spatial configuration of the danger zone.  This is the link for the interactive weather map that is continuously updated by NOAA.  Here is the high resolution, static versionThis fantastic wind map is also worth looking at whenever there are tornadoes or hurricanes.    

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An Underground Pool Drying Up

An Underground Pool Drying Up | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Portions of the High Plains Aquifer are rapidly being depleted by farmers who are pumping too much water to irrigate their crops, particularly in the southern half in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Levels have declined up to 242 feet in some areas, from predevelopment — before substantial groundwater irrigation began — to 2011.


Seth Dixon's insight:

The article connected to this map from the New York Times can be found here.  "Two years of extreme drought, during which farmers relied almost completely on groundwater, have brought the seriousness of the problem home. In 2011 and 2012, the Kansas Geological Survey reports, the average water level in the state’s portion of the aquifer dropped 4.25 feet — nearly a third of the total decline since 1996."


Tags: wateragriculture, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

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Michael Miller's curator insight, May 20, 2013 1:41 PM

The recent PBS special on the Dust Bowl also addressed this current problem and how some American farmers are not learning from past mistakes.

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Tea for Two

"We came to Sri Lanka with every intention of filming a video about an organic, fair trade tea farmer. That is exactly what we were planning when we set foot on the small tea farm of Piyasena and his wife Ariyawatha. What we didnt expect was to be so taken with the relationship between the two of them. What started as a farm story quickly turned into a story about love and dedication amongst the Ceylon tea fields."


Seth Dixon's insight:

The beginning of their love story is rooted in cultural traditions that many would find oppressive (arranged marriage), and yet there is much about their sweet relationship that is near-universally admired. 

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James Matthews's curator insight, May 21, 2013 11:16 AM

Definitely a case of oppression versus admiration - what a wonderful story.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:38 AM

This video is about a tea farming couple whose arranged marriage has been very successful. The cultural tradition of arranged marriage may seem oppressive to us, but there are a great number of them where the couple stays happy. In these cultures with arranged marriage, divorce is usually not a realistic option, so these couples are possibly more willing to cooperate to make their marriage work than in the United States, but undoubtedly many remain unhappily married.

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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a painful page in world history, but it needs retelling.  The Soviet era profoundly reshaped the cultural, political and economic geographies of the region.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Central Asiahistoricalwarethnicitypolitical, gerrymandering.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:37 PM

This graph represents the areas where many of the Chechnes had been displaced to in the era of Stalins regime. Many of these people were displaced from their homes and forced to move. Many of them either had to leave family behind of they were forced to move together and had no initial home to live in.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:51 PM

i see this as history retelling itself. for some reason throughout history terrible men think that their race is better than another, this is not true and if a person wants to think this that is their prerogative, but some men think it to such an extent that they seek to eliminate the entire other people. nothing good can come of this and it turns into mass conflict every time. it destroys countries and breeds hate on all sides.

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Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback
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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:43 PM

The Keystone Pipeline is a pipeline bringing natural gas from Canada into the States. Many politicians are against the XL project to connect the pipeline from the Tar Sands in Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, there has been much rebuff from the Democrats within the Congress and the White House.

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The Long Swath

"The Landsat's natural-color imager scanned a swath of land 185-kilometers wide and 9,000 kilometers long (120 by 6,000 miles)—an unusual, unbroken distance considering 70 percent of Earth is covered with water. That flight path—depicted on the globe below—afforded us the chance to assemble 56 still images into a seamless, flyover view of what LDCM saw on April 19, 2013. Stretching from northern Russia to South Africa, the full mosaic from the Operational Land Imager can be viewed in this video."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We typically see remotely sensed images as a single, still rectangular grid...this stunning video shows what the image collection process would look like from the perspective of the satellite.  This video is available to download in a variety of formats and resolutions.


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 17, 2013 6:43 PM

The Long Swath | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 10:22 AM
pls do you have an idea on how to fix scan line errors on Lansat7 ETM images from 2003. thanks Bro
nativemedia's comment, September 25, 2013 12:27 AM
excellent
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Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'?

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don't occur. American tragedies don't occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial Op-Ed article that discusses how place and the major axes of identity (race, class and gender) shape and intersect with the the national memory of violence and the media portrayal of violence.  According the David Dennis, "The media seems to forget about New Orleans and any place that the middle class can't easily relate to." 


Tags: race, class, gender, place.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 7:09 PM

It is truly amazing how much location has an impact on society and the way we view things. When we experienced such tragedy's as the Boston Marathon bombing or Columbine it was national news. The city was in an uproar and no matter what radio station you had on or what tv channel you were watching you were hearing about it. Everyone was mourning for those families and people effected by the tragedies. When you think about it, those sort of things are not expected to happen in those places which is what makes it so upsetting to people. Because it is not expected to happen there it becomes national news. However what does that mean about places like compton, New Orleans, and etc? Since people expect violent things to happen there it doesn't make national news because it is of no surpise to anyone that something like that were to happen there. Even if it is expected that doesn't make it right. The shooting at the mother's day parade should be treated like any other tragedy. Unfortunately the location of the tragedy makes it "less" of a tragedy in the eyes on the public because "those sort of things always happen there". It is amazing how much our perception of location can taint the way we see tragedy. It shouldn't be that way, but unfortunetly it's what happens in the world today. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:44 AM
New Orleans has been struggling even through Katrina to get some recognition that even though their society is not necessarily rich they deserve the same respect as anyone else would. To think especially after what New England endured with the Marathon Bombing to see something like this happen and not even really be recognized nationally is sad. These are people just like everyone else and they deserve to be treated the same as everyone else.
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Want to Get High-Skill Immigration Right? Think About Detroit

Want to Get High-Skill Immigration Right? Think About Detroit | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rust Belt cities are hoping that immigrants can help rebuild our their shrinking communities. Washington should gear policy to helping them.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, May 16, 2013 9:44 PM

Not tech .... But we are impacted in Michigan .....

Nganguem Victor's curator insight, June 3, 2013 8:07 AM

j'aime ça

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Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan

Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Humanist geography, a movement within the field of human geography (itself a sub-field of geography) arose in the 1970s as a way to counter what humanists saw as a tendency to treat places as mere sites or locations. Instead, a humanist geographer would argue, the places we inhabit have as many personalities as those whose lives have intersected with them. And the stories we tell about places often say as much about who we are, as about where our feet are planted.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Anytime a geographer uses the phrase "sense of place," they owe an intellectual debt of gratitude to Yi-Fu Tuan This article is an introduction to the man and his work that is accessible to all audiences.   


Tags: place, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Romana Quintel's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:05 AM

An interesting way to view Aboriginal people's link to country.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:38 AM

Articulo que introduce a la obra del geógrafo humanista Yi-Fu Tuan, uno de los 21 historiadores para el siglo XXI que José Enrique Ruiz-Domènec seleccionó en su libro Rostros para la historia

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before

Mind-Bending 'Inception' Maps Show Manhattan Like You Haven't Seen It Before | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"London-based design firm BERG created these two 3D maps of Manhattan, which look like a scene out of "Inception" (via Curbed NY)."

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Christopher Chris Benoit's comment, May 14, 2013 3:20 AM
Wow
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, May 14, 2013 6:06 PM

des cartes..

gokhanht's comment, May 18, 2013 3:59 AM
great article