Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything

On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Black gold has brought big-money jobs and severe growing pains to once-sleepy North Dakota towns.


A remarkable transformation is underway in western North Dakota, where an oil boom is changing the state's fortunes and leaving once-sleepy towns bursting at the seams. In a series of stories, NPR is exploring the economic, social and environmental demands of this modern-day gold rush.

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chris tobin's comment, February 6, 2014 10:46 AM
http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi Also visit this website on some good information.......
chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 2014 10:49 AM

http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi                 ;

 

  Visit this website for some good information..................

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 4:10 PM

The state of North Dakota has been a very low population remote state until recently. Large influx of people into these towns is causing more problems than they can handle and may just destroy the state. Once the work opportunities run out everyone will leave, but by then all the current towns will have been changed, maybe to the point where they couldn't recover.

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Gravity...

Gravity... | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/

Seth Dixon's insight:

On January 21, 2014 in Termeno, Italy (South Tyrol) a massive rockfall disrupted the agricultural landscape that sits in the shadow of the Alps.  The video that shows the impact of this rockfall powerfully highlights that natural forces are always in motion.  

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 31, 2014 1:42 PM

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

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Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship

Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Forget Somalia, the world's new epicenter of piracy is on the other side of Africa."


Some experts believe that the uptick in the number and geographical reach of pirate attacks is due in part precisely to the 2009 government amnesty for the Nigerian militants in the Niger Delta who had justified their attacks on oil infrastructure and their widespread theft of crude oil as a political protest. "With the political pretense lost, there is no longer any need for oil thieves to limit themselves to targets in the Delta," a United Nations study said.

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Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:08 AM

This article points to the little known problem of piracy off the western coast of Africa.  When one thinks of African piracy, one thinks of the Somali pirates it is important to know that piracy is not just limited to eastern Africa.

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."

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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:55 PM

I was a little confused by this graph at first, as I thought it was measuring population rather than the ranking of the respective metro areas. It is still just as telling, however, even if it is not measuring population. Despite the fact that the lines get a bit jumbled at times, it really is a fascinating graph to look at. It is representative of some tangible and traceable geographic trends that occurred as a result of politics or economics. It is especially interesting to note the decrease in rank of many northeastern metro areas and their replacement by metro areas in the western or central parts of the country. This is, of course, symbolic of the westward expansion of the country during the mid to early 1800s and the decline of the northeast as the dominant population center of the country. 

 

There are some things in particular that are interesting to note as an historian. For instance, New York's almost perfectly constant place as the largest metro area in the country says a lot about where the country is centered economically and socially. The rapid emergence of Los Angeles as a major metro area in the early 1900s speaks to the new wave of immigration that was occurring at that time. These trends, though not shown on or accompanied by a map, are very telling. Anyone with a basic knowledge of geography and U.S. history can see why certain things trend the way that they do. This graph also reinforces my belief that geography is an absolutely pivotal part of history. It is important to know where things are when you are talking about them in an historical context, or else you will have no visual reference or background and events may seem confusing or unclear. 

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The States of Our Union ... Are Not All Strong

The States of Our Union ... Are Not All Strong | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"On Tuesday, President Obama, if precedent holds, will declare that the state of America’s union is 'strong.' Is it?" 


Politico Magazine rounded up 14 different state rankings from reputable sources like the Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the FBI, and on important factors such as high school graduation rates, per capita income, life expectancy and crime rate. Then we averaged out each state’s 14 rankings to come up with a master list—atop which sits none other than New Hampshire. The approach isn’t scientific or comprehensive (we also hold no grudges against the State of Mississippi), but given that eight of the lowest-ranking states on our list overlap with the bottom 10 on his, maybe less has changed in the past 83 years than you’d think.

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Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:23 PM

It's no surprise to me that New Hampshire is the top, it's my favorite state after all! From its tax policies to its fireworks legality, all of it resonates with me! It's one of my top choices for states to move to, rural areas with mountains and forests rate at the top of my list, and this one has snow and skiing to boot! I'd love nothing more than to teach at a small school up in the high elevations once I get my Elementary Education degree.

Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:29 PM

Determining how strong a state is is kind of ridiculous. Sure, you can look at the states per capita income and such, but really determining which states union is strongest is a whacky idea. This article has no scientific method research within and it and the idea of a never-changing society is just absurd.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking

The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One of our colleagues and leaders in spatial thinking in education, Dr. Diana Stuart Sinton, has written a book entitled The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinkingalong with colleagues Sarah Bednarz, Phil Gersmehl, Robert Kolvoord, and David Uttal.  As the name implies, the book provides an accessible and readable way for students, educators, and even the general public to understand what spatial thinking is and why it matters.  It “help[s] us think across the geographies of our life spaces, physical and social spaces, and intellectual space.”  Dr. Sinton pulls selections from the NRC’s Learning to Think Spatially report and ties them to everyday life.  In so doing, she also provides ways for us in the educational community to think about teaching these concepts and skills in a variety of courses.   Indeed, as she points out, spatial thinking is particularly essential within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as geography."  - See more at: ESRI's GIS Education Community blog

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Fran Martin's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:07 AM

Useful for what we mean when we say 'thinking geographically'.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:17 PM

Educação geográfica! 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 7:02 PM

Guía popular de pensamiento espacial.

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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.
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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:21 PM

Around the world is the same set of problems. Check the Esri  resources that are used to compare cities.

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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...
Seth Dixon's insight:

The collapse of the Aral Sea ecosystem is (arguably) the worst man-made environmental disaster of the 20th century and 21st century has seen the desertification continue.  Soviet mismanagement, water-intensive cotton production and population growth have all contributed the overtaxing of water resources in the Aral Sea basin, which has resulted in the shrinking of the Aral Sea--it has lost more of the sea to an expanding desert than the territories of the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg combined.  The health problems arising from this issues are large for the entire Aral Sea basin, which encompasses 5 Central Asian countries and it has profoundly changed (for the worse) the local climates.  Compare the differences with some historical images of the Aral Sea on Google Earth or on ArcGIS Online (also see this article from GeoCurrents).  


Tags: environment, Central Asia, environment modify.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "

Seth Dixon's insight:

What looks like a wonderful little "Scooby-Doo" mystery turns out to be a great place-based video on city planning, land use and utilities (I don't want to ruin the surprise that comes at the 2 minute mark, but don't worry, it's worth it).  If you are teaching a course trying to help students to think about the inner-workings of a city this article would be a very attention grabbing way to make a good point (NPR posted article on this as well).  What 'secrets' are hidden in plain sight in your local neighborhood?  


Tagsurban, planning.


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond has created an enhanced version of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which was published in 1932. The atlas, which took dozens of researchers to assemble, used maps to illustrate a variety of political, demographic and economic concepts."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm sure many of you have already seen it but this is a gem. This is something that you must explore on your own, but I will say that there should be something for everyone in this digital treasure trove.  Read a New York Times review on the digital atlas here.  

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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:37 AM

Muy buen material!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 2014 11:24 AM

Atlas de la geografíia histórica de Estados Unidos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:33 PM

Okay, this is actually pretty cool. The atlas is huge and has tons of information within it. No wonder there were tons of helping hands who created this map(s) of insightful looks at demographic and political debate.

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once stated,"A man who won't die for something is not fit to live." Arrested over twenty times, stabbed in the chest, his house firebombed and, ultimately shot and killed, King embodied the idea that equality and the African American Civil Rights Movement were worth dying for.He was a husband and father to four children as persecution and death threats filled his days, yet his example was one of nonviolent, civil disobedience.Had he not been assassinated, King would have celebrated his 85th birthday on January 15th."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Dr. Martin Luther King fought racial segregation (which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations).  Dr. King has been described as a critical geographer for some of his insights.  In 1967, MLK stated, "The expansion of suburbia and migration from the South has worsened big-city segregation.  The suburbs are a white noose around the black necks of cities… suburbs expand with little regard for what happens to the rest of America.”  If you are a Maps 101 subscriber, please read the rest of this article that I co-authored with Julie Dixon.  You can also sign up for a free trial subscription or listen to the article as a free podcast on Stitcher Radio.  

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:16 PM

Martin Luther King Jr. is an iconic figure in American history. A man that will be remembered forever, as he overcame so much adversity and risked his life on a daily basis for the greater good of America. After being arrested multiple times, injured and threatened, most people would have given up, but not him. He is one who never gave up on his dreams and proves that anything is possible.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:27 PM

We celebrate Martin Luther King JR because he was a man of pride. In history, those who are remembered did something great most likely. He was an activist for the Civil Rights movement and had a dream that one day the world would treat everyone as equals. He was assassinated and unfortunately that is another reason we celebrate and honor his life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:40 PM

This article wouldn't open when I clicked on it. It said I had to sign into some website that I have never used so I couldn't access this article. So I'm basically winging this one and making it an opinion scoop. I think that celebrating Martin Luther King Day is very important. Not only did he do all he could to make the blacks be treated equally, but he went through hell trying to do it. He was tortured by people in the town and his house was even set on fire. This is just as important as the Rosa Parks incident and the Brown V.S. Board of Education. We celebrate this day to remind us about how he died trying to set things right and have everyone be treated equally. We also celebrate this day to continue his love and peace in this world. Because of Martin Luther King Jr., we now can all live, work, and be a part of the same community, whether you are black or white.

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Great Circle Mapper

Great Circle Mapper | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Great Circle Mapper displays maps and computes distances along a geodesic path. It includes an extensive, searchable database of airports and other locations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The shortest distance between two points is not a straight line…well, that depends on your map projection.  A flat map always distorts something when representing our three-dimensional Earth—whether it is distance, direction, shape or area—something gets distorted on our maps.  A great circle is the shortest distance between two points on the surface of a sphere, so that’s going to be the quickest travel route between points (which is why so many airline routes seem to arc).  This website Great Circle Mapper generates great circles that show the shortest distance between two points on many map projects will be an arc.  Why does this particular route arc ‘bend’ north for a while and then south?  Get out a globe for added perspective.   

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:31 AM

Cool tool.

matthias brendler's curator insight, January 16, 2014 10:34 AM

Maps Monster am I!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:59 PM

Because this route from JFK Airport to SYD AUS Airport is not a straight route there are many factors that need to be taken in account because of the overwhelming idea of trade winds and how that affects flight plans and routing for different airways/airlanes.  The plane has to fight against the trafe winds in order to create a specific ETA for the passenger and the flight crue among the plane. This is all dependent upon the trade winds (prevailing and other kinds) transmitting against the plane.

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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

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Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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Sinkholes and Karst Topography

The above YouTube clip was embedded in this LiveScience article: "Sinkholes are an increasingly deadly risk in Florida, due primarily to the region's geology. The state is largely underlain by porous limestone, which can hold immense amounts of water in underground aquifers. As groundwater slowly flows through the limestone, it forms a landscape called karst, known for features like caves, springs and sinkholes.

The water in aquifers also exerts pressure on the limestone and helps to stabilize the overlying surface layer, usually clay, silt and sand in Florida. Sinkholes form when that layer of surface material caves in.

The collapse can be triggered by a heavy overload, often caused by a downpour or flooding, or when water gets pumped out of the ground."

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 11:03 PM
What a great piece. Mind your p's and q's and Karst.
Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

ERougeux courses's curator insight, August 2, 9:05 AM
This is insane!
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What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta

What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Republicans want to blame government (a Democrat thing) or Atlanta (definitely a Democrat thing). Democrats want to blame the region’s dependence on cars (a Republican thing), the state government (Republicans), and many of the transplants from more liberal, urban places feel the same way you might about white, rural, southern drivers. All of this is true to some extent but none of it is helpful."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are no easy answers, but that doesn't mean we people aren't trying to frame this in an easy narrative.  Also look at the Washington Post's compliation of 16 pictures that highlight the missteps in handling this unusual problem.   

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:13 PM

   AH, only government could make such a mess out of snow. It seems impossible to get anyone to agree to anything. Solutions need to be found in ways to work together. I think snow is the least of the issues here. It just doesn’t happen often enough to be of great concern. But city, state and local governments need to learn to work together for the best interests of their constituents. 

 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 2:46 PM

Atlanta's struggles with 2 inches of snow was a hilarious sight. I mean its funny for us Northerners but not for them. We are used to driving our big large trucks over 6 inches of snow but for them its like a global error, they see it as the end of the world. A friend of mine from Goergia who moved up here in the north says its hard for him to get through the snow now, because he is adjusting to the climate by wearing coats and etc. So i guess its like the same thing for Northerners when a Tornado occurs  around our area we freak and panic.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:09 PM

to me, as a native born northerner, right here in RI, it is funny to hear that a state gets freaked out by a little bit of snow, when to me, two inches of snow is not even an amount to cross my mind when it snows. I used to know a guy that attended school here at RIC, I met him in my French class my first year here. He grew up in San Diegeo his entire life and only moved here when he married his wife. He told me the very first time it snowed here he was on a highway, got nervous because he never had to drive in snow before and said he when he came across the closest bridge, he parked under it. I even have a friend now that said when he was in basic training for the USAF in Texas, it had snowed one night and his Drill Instructors cancelled drill for the day because the base was not equipped with proper snow removal machines or shovels. 

 

as for the government wise, there was a paragraph explaining how should people be trained? because if they are trained now and it does not snow again until 2020, those people probably moved on with other jobs and have new ones, so what about the new untrained people? I think, that even though it is not likely to happen, the new people should have a brief training on snow removal. 

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"


Seth Dixon's insight:

Vietnam is a historically tea-drinking country, and when the French colonized, they brought coffee.  Culturally they still prefer tea, but in the 1980s, the government say this as a major export crop that they were climatically primed to produce.  This rapid growth has bolstered the economy, but has had some adverse environmental impacts as well.  The article is rich in geographic topics to bring into the classroom.

  

Tags: Vietnamagricultureglobalization, SouthEastAsia.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:20 PM

Globalization is a polarizing topic, and that is embodied very well in this article concerning the economic ascendancy of the Vietnamese economy. Globalization is responsible for the colonization of the nation, and the subsequent century of bloodshed between opposing nationalist and international forces. Global trade, however, and the introduction of coffee in Vietnam by the French, is responsible for Vietnam's current economic boost. 30 years ago, 60% of Vietnamese lived below the national poverty line; today, that number has fallen to below 10%, an extraordinary achievement. How? Vietnam has emerged as a major player in the global coffee trade, its market share rising from 0.1% to 20% in the same time period, ensuring mass employment for the first time since colonization. Is the system perfect? No- we have learned that diversified economies are integral to development, and nations too dependent on a single sector of the economy can face ruin when confronted with fluctuating market prices, supply, and global demand. There could be improvements to the existing trade, and the government could be doing even more for those who fall below the poverty line- the average Vietnamese worker still only makes a paltry $1300 annual salary- but this is a major step in the right direction. Hopefully this trend can continue, and Vietnam can continue its rise and become a fully developed nation, much like its predecessors in Asia, South Korea, China, and Japan.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:59 PM

Well for one thing this gives a chance for growth at the expense of others. I noticed though that the numbers stated that since the end of the war in 1975 the poverty level has decreased from 60% to 10%. But what about the possibility of corruption? environmentally there appears to be  deforestation, lots of water usage therefore future water shortage.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march
Seth Dixon's insight:

To understand much of the political situation in Central Africa, a short history of the recent political and ethnic turmoil in Rwanda and Congo are helpful.  This particular videographic from the Economist is a few years old, but the historical context is still incredibly relevant  This series provides a wealth of information and several will be added to the place-based geography videos interactive map.


Tags: Congo, political, conflict, devolution, refugees, Africa.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:39 PM

This is another sad story.  There is fast wealth in this area.  More than enough to get this economy off the ground and be a booming source of wealth for the countries.  Ever since the British, Belgiums, and foreigners created conflict in the area there has been so much unrest. They need to get out of their own ways and elect someone who won't steal millions.  They could get back to the golden days, but not until they have some peace which would then lead to prosperity.  

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:00 PM

once again a recurring theme, greedy and corrupt people running countries. with such immense mineral deposits how can this country not be prospering. because the people of these countries are selfish and once again not nationalistic to the point where people will try to make a significant change.

Brian von Kraus's curator insight, January 12, 2016 6:15 PM

Amazing videographic from The Economist showing the recent history of Congo that explains the current instability of the country. 

Suggested by Thomas Schmeling
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The London Array

The London Array | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes.

The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image. White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:16 PM

England is in a peculiar situation due to their geographic location limiting their ability to expand outward and collect homegrown resources. As the first world nations push towards a “greener” and more sustainable energy producing ability, the effects of trying to help the Earth, both positive and negative need to be taken into effect. As some opponents to the wind farm have brought up, it can negatively affect the bird species in the area. What matters most? England’s attempt to wean themselves off of unsustainable resource dependence in order to enhance the future generations may be seen as a positive but with every action, there is a reaction.

 The issue that comes up as we humans try to better our relationship with the Earth in an effort not to destroy our home, paired with our lust for a healthy and non-apocalyptic future that we can still absorb ourselves into social media – do we negatively impact local animal species for our greater cause or do we limit our footprint even if it takes a viable option for the enhancement of our own resource dependence off the table. I guess if the long term effect on the birds and the resulting issues of their no longer presence was fully and responsibly researched and the pros and cons were compared to each other, then time will tell if the wind farm does more harm or good.

Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:21 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very nice to see alternative forms of energy being explored. The conscious effort to cut carbon emissions is a benefit for the entire planet.

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During the course of the semester in World Regional Geography, I have my students complete all of the following quizzes (and 9 more for a total of 20 quizzes):



Tags: regions, trivia, games.


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:20 PM

I hope the lizard point Geography tests are enough. I have sent you my screenshots for the ones I have taken.

 

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A photograph (or landscape, map, etc.) is not an innocent reflection of reality.  They can be carefully crafted to tell a story which might reflect the bigger picture and your ideological framework--but it just as easily might obscure some important contexts and truths.  I use these images at the beginning of the semester to discuss the bias inherent in our own perspectives as I try to infuse my classroom with a variety of lenses with which to view different regions (images found here).


Tags: images, landscape, perspective, regions.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.


So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.

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viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

not only has poverty increased drastically in the south and spread west but also states that where considered to be low percentage of poverty have increased to poverty. many states up north are now in danger. the economy hasn't increased at all in the last twenty plus years and it should be interesting to see what happens in the future, hopefully the south doesn't get too far under the poverty line to the point where it can't be brought back.

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Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks

Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports since 2008 to produce an interactive map that plots global outbreaks of diseases that are easily prevented by inexpensive and effective vaccines.
Seth Dixon's insight:

For more analysis, read this LA Times article.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:21 PM

Alotyhough this information is open to the public it is very important to take into contex that many of Americans don't get vaccines theyb should every year but it is even worse in other countries and places in the world that dont have the accessibility that other well off countries have. The Global health aspect many outbreaks have happened because of lack of vaccinations and infected others in relation next to them. This causes an outbreak because of lack of vaccinations.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:24 PM

While looking at thsi map it is apparent that whiloe looking at South America out of all the other nations on the map South America is the one with the least Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks. What does this say about the Countinent as a whole? Well firstly if you look at Colombia there were 13 Measel outbreaks and 603 Whooping Cough outbreaks. Compare this to Eastern Brazil right on the coast only had measel's but the South of that were 1257 of Whooping Cough. In Equador there was the Measels and only measels at 326 cases. Why is the South of the Contenent drastiacally different then the rest of the Contenent and the rest of the world for that matter. No cases of Polio or Cholera whereas Africa had these apparent in large quantities.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:53 PM

Egypt has had an overwhelming amout of outbreaks of the mumps and the total was 571 cases throughtout the years.

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Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day

Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Colliding continents and cracks in the Earth’s crust make for some remarkable scenery in western China.


Just south of the Tien Shan mountains, in northwestern Xinjiang province, a remarkable series of ridges dominate the landscape. The highest hills rise up to 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) above the adjacent basins, and they are decorated with distinctive red, green, and cream-colored sedimentary rock layers. The colors reflect rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.  When land masses collide, the pressure can create what geologists call “fold and thrust belts.” Slabs of sedimentary rock that were laid down horizontally can be squeezed into wavy anticlines and synclines. 

The ridge is noticeably offset by a strike-slip or “tear” fault in the image showing the Piqiang Fault, a northwest trending strike-slip fault that runs roughly perpendicular to the thrust faults for more than 70 kilometers (40 miles). The colored sedimentary rock layers are offset by about 3 kilometers (2 miles) in this area.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, February 8, 2014 2:40 PM
Dit hoeft geen strike-slip te zijn. Het zijn hellende lagen, dus de breuk kan ook een op- of afschuiving zijn.
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
Seth Dixon's insight:

And here is another list of for 40 maps, part one and part two and part two

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism.