Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Pigskin Geography

Pigskin Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pigskin Geography is a 17-week program that motivates students to learn United States geography by tracking the travels of competing professional football teams with the NFL schedule.


Pigskin Geography is an incredibly dynamic way to teach the geography of the United States. Specifically tailored for 4-6 grade students, this program gives students a series of 17 weekly activities that are adapted to the NFL schedule that week. These questions do NOT rely on football knowledge, but uses this as an opportunity to introduce vocabulary teams, and explore other places. For example: “This week the New Orleans Saints will ‘march’ over Cairo, IL, going to their game in Green Bay, WI. Locate Cairo at the southern end of the Illinois. Cairo is located at the CONFLUENCE of the _______ River and the _________________River.”


Tags: USA, sport, K12, geography, GeographyEducation, training.

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Christopher John's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:14 PM

Football Stuff for Geography

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States


Tags: USA, historical, visualization

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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.


The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.


Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.

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The Geography of Underwater Homes

The Geography of Underwater Homes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New data from Zillow shows fewer homeowners underwater, but the pattern varies widely by geography.

 

The Sunbelt (especially California and Florida) have the highest percentage of homeowners that are 'underwater' and owe more than the home is worth.  Also hit hard are declining metro areas area of the rust belt. 

Question to ponder: Why would these places be hit the hardest?  

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Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 6:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this

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July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S.

July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By Climate Central's Michael D. Lemonick: July 2012 was officially not only the warmest July on record, but also the warmest month ever recorded for the lower 48 states, according to a report released Wednesday by scientists at the National Oceanic...

 

The drought footprint cover 63% of the contiguous states during the hottest month in American history.  It's the hottest 12 month stretch (August 2011-July 2012) on record for the lower 48, making it the fourth consecutive month to set a new record (i.e. old record was July 2011-June 2012).The biggest difference from other hot months is the nighttime temperature have been exceptionally high.  The most current drought monitor map can be found at the University of Nebraske website. 

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U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries

U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How do the individual economies of U.S. cities stack up against the world? Here’s a few quiz questions that can be answered with our chart of the 50 largest U.S. metro areas.

 

This article shows the economic strength of numerous greater metropolitan regions in the United States.  Even more important than the article is the "Interactive Graphics" which presents the tabular data of the top countries by GDP interlaced with U.S. metro area's GDPs.  Amazingly, 11 metropolitan areas (if they were independent countries) would rank in the top 50 countries of the world based on total GDP.

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Kelsey Saunders's comment, August 24, 2012 9:25 PM
This article really shows how economically high the united states is. It is crazy to think that New York is larger economically than a lot of countries such as Poland, Mexico, and Sweden. I wouldn't have ever thought that that would be possible. It makes me wonder how different it would be to live in a place that is very low economically.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 3, 2012 7:52 AM
I kinda expected cities like New York and Seattle to be on the list but out city is on the list to, above complete contires. That's what really astonished me because Virgigna Beach and Norfolk and Newport News aren't big cities. Some how we still have larger economies than entire countries like Angola Cuba and Oman. It makes me wonder how entire contires would be able to suport their citizens with an ecomomy smaller thn 3 cities.
Hannah Provost's comment, September 10, 2012 7:42 PM
This article is an eye opener, To think that New York is larger economically than countries like Sweden really puts it into perspective of how big the United States Is economically compared to other countries. I never thought that a single CITY in america would have a higher GDP than a free standing country. unbelievable.
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A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Americans eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world, but habits are starting to change. This may be in part because of health and environmental concerns. We explore some of the meat trends and changes in graphs and charts.

 

Often we hear about the dietary impact of meat consumption at the personal scale, but what are the environmental impacts of heavy meat consumption on a global scale?  Even more telling than the podcast are the charts and infographics that are connected to this article.  Not all meats have the same environmental impact (beef is much less environmentally efficient than chicken, pork or turkey).   As globalization has spread, American cultural preferences have changed worldwide taste preferences.  As the global population rises, the impact of meat consumption is now a major environmental concern. 

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Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
2010 Poverty Rate: 15.1%, 46.2 million people in poverty.

Here are the numbers behind the face of poverty in America.

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Historical Tornado Data Visualized

Historical Tornado Data Visualized | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This strangely beautiful map shows every tornado to hit the U.S. between 1950 and 2011.  What physical geographic factors lead to this distribution?  What are the impacts of this data on human geography?  

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 10, 2012 12:28 PM
Def in agreement with John I'm wondering myself as to what the cause of the hole is. Id speculate it is due to some sort of terrain issues. maybe even man made structures.
melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:00 PM
the physical geographic factors that lead to the the distribution of tornadoes in the US is because the jet stream coming from the west and hot air from the Gulf of Mexio air both crashing together. This mostly happens in the Midwestern part of the country. Though there are times when supercell thunderstorms pop up in different parts of the country and can form tornadoes, such as the southern part of the US. The impacts of this data on human geography are can range from little damage to catastrophic causing billions of dollars in damage.
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Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    

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Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
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Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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Tour the States - Music Video

Full album: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats Music by Renald Francoeur Drawing by Craighton Berman "Tour the States" is track #1 from Brain Beats, a mnemonic CD...


It’s so often stated that geography education is so much more than just learning states and capitals. I wholeheartedly endorse that sentiment, but there is still some rudimentary importance to learning about where places are. I see it as analogous for English majors needing to learn basic grammar. You can’t write a masterpiece if you are still fumbling around with the alphabet. In geography, we can't have a nuanced discussion of place and interconnectedness if we have no sense of where any place actually is.


Tags: USA, K12, video, GeographyEducation.

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Gillian & Alexis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:11 PM

A great, to-the-point video showing the political geography of the United States. Quick and fast facts on the 50 states and capitals made into a catchy song! Chosen for poltical geography content. TOPIC: Geography-Location

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The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’

The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’ | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Since Katrina, the cartoonish pace of vegetation growth in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans resembles something out of a Chia Pet commercial.


The ecosystem is reclaiming parts of New Orleans that have been physically or economically abandoned.  This is part elevation, climate and ecosystem; but it is also about urban land uses, disinvestment and socioeconomics.


Tags: urban ecology, environment, ecology, urban, unit 7 cities, disasters, land use

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Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 26, 2015 1:21 PM

Max

Due to all the death and destruction brought upon New Orleans by hurricane Katrina, areas like the lower ninth ward have been partially abandoned and left unmaintained. What was once neat, urban blocks has now become a jungle. Along with the vegetation becoming a nuisance, it has also brought along with it pests such as possums, coyotes, and even alligators. The vacant lots have also become places criminals sometimes use for murder/rape, making the neighborhood much more dangerous.

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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

  1. The Graphic Foundations of American History
  2. Capturing the Past Through Maps
  3. Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping
  4. Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography
  5. The Cartographic Consolidating of America


Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA

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USA Watercolor Map

USA Watercolor Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Buy USA Watercolor Map art prints by Michael Tompsett at Imagekind.com. Shop Thousands of Canvas and Framed Wall Art Prints and Posters at Imagekind.

I'll settle for the digital image to be a poster on my website. 

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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."

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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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A Guide to Mass Shootings in America

A Guide to Mass Shootings in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There have been at least 57 in the last 30 years—and most of the killers got their guns legally.

 

Still not sure if I'm prepared to explain what this all means, but it would be worth discussing in class. 

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Map of America’s Hispanic population

Map of America’s Hispanic population | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the race to the White House, no ethnic group is more prized than Hispanics. President Obama ended deportations for some young undocumented immigrants, and the Romney campaign is vetting Sen.

 

This interactive map feature combines to interesting variables (at the county level): the percentage of the total population that is Hispanic, and the 2008 presidential election.  Analyze your local area and a few counties as well.  What connection exists between the two variables?  How come?  What are some exceptions to these general patterns?

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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   

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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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Controversies in Globalization

Controversies in Globalization | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Olympic committee and designer came under withering criticism for manufacturing the garments in China.

 

Two current controversies (Team USA clothing being made in China and Mitt Romney's potential involvement as Bain outsourced jobs) are fundamentally about what Americans think about globalization and the impact of globalization on the United States.  Globalization is most certainly a mixed bag at every scale.  What is intriguing about these controversies is that most Americans see themselves as net 'victims' of globalization, while many people outside the United States would view the United States as an overwhelming beneficiary of the economic and cultural processes that are collectively called globalization.  So what is it?  Do Americans just want to have their cake and eat it too?  Can a country only embrace the beneficial elements of globalization without accepting that negatives  inherently will come with them as a package deal?  How can a country (or the world, individual) maximize the advantages of globalization while minimizing the negatives?     

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Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 2016 9:07 AM
I love how this article talks about globalization as a "mixed bag" and looking at maximizing and minimizing for our good.
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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?

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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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Latino boom makes Orlando proving ground for Obama

Latino boom makes Orlando proving ground for Obama | Geography Education | Scoop.it
President Obama and Mitt Romney are set to make appearances beginning Thursday at a major gathering of Latino officials and activists...

 

A core component of the 2012 U.S. presidential elections will be the demographic profile of both the Republican and Democratic Parties’ power base. For most of American history, the African-American population was the largest minority second to the Caucasian minority. Since the 2000 census, the Latino population has overtaken the African-American population as the largest minority in the U.S.  How does this impact both parties?  What are the strategies of both parties to appeal from a diverse set of voters?   How does the immigration issue shape 'identity politics?'

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 12, 2012 3:40 PM
Unlike African Americans there is much more differentiation within the Latino population which contains within itself many nationalities with competing priorities. Due to this wide variation of interest it will likely be much harder for either the Democrats or Republicans to gain the support of the entire group. Therefor this question may revolve around what kind of people or concerns will both parties use to gain the support of the majority ofdifferent interest groups within Americas Latino population for the 2012 election.
GIS student's comment, September 13, 2012 9:25 AM
The problem ahead for the republicans is that many of their views and opinions go against the ideas of many Latinos. According to the article Romney has many struggles with Latino community because his views are the opposite of what the majority of the Latino voters consider. On the opposite side Obama has a difficult road ahead as well. Does he focus his campaign more on the large minority or does he concentrate on the majority which could cause a shift in the minority. Regardless Florida has been a primary example of identity politics ever since the election 2008 where some areas were no longer considered battleground areas.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 10:05 AM
Well, I would like to say is that the Hispanic minority is the majority of the Florida population including major cities like Orlando which is mentioned in the article and Miami. Historically, Florida was a Spanish colony which was led by Juan Ponce De Leon. Even though that Florida is usually a Republican state when it comes to voting but I think that it'll be more of a major impact for the Democratic party than the republican party because of the immigration issues that President Obama was paying attention to throughout his presidency so far.
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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.