Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson briefly summarizes the history of urban development and the technological advances that enable it.  Towards the end of the video they offer some suggestions that would make cities more sustainable as urban populations continue to grow.  What do you think of these suggestions?  

Tags: historical, urban, planning, TED

s smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This lesson goes nicely with this article fro the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  

Tag: population, demographic transition model, TED.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration


This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 


This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

The supercontinent Pangaea, with its connected South America and Africa, broke apart 200 million years ago. But the continents haven't stopped shifting -- the tectonic plates beneath our feet (in Earth's two top layers, the lithosphere and the asthenosphere) are still traveling at about the rate your fingernails grow. Michael Molina discusses the catalysts and consequences of continental drift.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This Ted-ED lesson is a great visual way to show the basics of plate tectonics and some geomorphological processes. 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, TED, K12, video.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:03 PM

Plate tectonics have alot to do with the world and how the world will evolve and in which way it will tranform in specific places. Pangaea involves not only Africa but also South America and how they broke away from the rest of the contenents about 200 million years ago. This idea involves the reality that the continents never stop shifting and the top two layer's of the Earth still grow at the rate of our finger nails grow. Divergent and Convergent boundries are apparent in the Earths ability to shift and eith come together or dive apart.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 26, 2014 4:55 PM

Very interesting that the earth has changed and continues to change. The continents have been separated over time and the example is there as Michael Molina explains that the continents of Africa and South America were once united as they have found remains of dinosaurs in eastern South America and West Africa.

April Howard's curator insight, February 13, 2015 1:36 PM

Visual Explanation of Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Part of me hates to bring up this issue since it is so disturbing, but silence itself is a part of the problem.  Just know that I don't bring this up lightly and I wouldn't share this with students of all ages.  Read more on in the this topic in the accompanying article here.  The filmmaker has explained why he was motivated to produce this, but not everyone thinks the message of the full documentary is fair and balanced.

Questions to Ponder (with a heavy heart): what cultural, political and demographic factors create the conditions where a situation like this can occur?  What should and can be done?

Tags: gender, development, India, China,

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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The Authoritative Map

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map. 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable?  


Tags: mapping, perspective, K12, video

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.


Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Chimamanda Adichie: The danger of a single story

"Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding."

Seth Dixon's insight:

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How can we teach and learn about other places in a way that develops geographic empathy and shows the many stories of that can belong to any one place? 

Tags: Africa, perspective, TED.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:30 PM

This video is very interesting, in that Chimamanda Adichie tells the dangers of hearing a one sided story. It is easy to classify a country with the rest, but it is also inaccurate because they are not the same. This video reminds me of another titled "Media and Culture-- Perspective and Bias" which also takes on the idea of knowing only one side of a story or people. It is videos and people like Adichie and Reza Aslan (from the above mentioned video) that implore us to research and make ourselves knowledgable about a subject, culture, or people before making assumptions and making the mistake of grouping them together for the sake of an easy story.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:39 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon. This is an eye opening narrative on what it's like to be African. This video really made me question my own cultural biases and microagressions. Powerful piece.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:50 PM

this is a big problem in the world today in my mind. other places do not have the nationalism that is required to thrive. even this woman (who eventually became an exception) started off idolizing western countries. this is not inherently a problem but places do not try to make themselves better, the reason there is the perception of africa that there is, is because people like this woman are the exception. if more people followed her lead than the whole of Africa would not be seen this way.

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Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks

Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks | Geography Education |
Here, go around the world in less than 180 minutes with TEDGlobal talks.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've linked various TED talks on this site; this playlist is a quick global tour feature some old favorites and ones that were new to me. 

Tags: TED, worldwide, and video.

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Augmented Reality Sandbox

Video of a sandbox equipped with a Kinect 3D camera and a projector to project a real-time colored topographic map with contour lines onto the sand surface. ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of our first experiments of creating landforms and designing a new world started in the sandbox.  This video shows how that early childhood activity can make for an excellent classroom demonstration to shows how Earth's physical systems work.  If you don't happen to have a digital topographic map to superimpose on the sandbox and a GPU-based water simulation, then at least you've got this video.  Click here to learn more about this UC Davis project on the visualization of lake ecosystems.

Tags: water, physical, geomorphology, landforms, visualization.


Tibshirani's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:07 PM

very cool!

David Ricci's comment, April 22, 2013 3:40 PM
I actually watched this video the first time we went to the computer lab in gauge just because it caught my eye. I think that this is a cool way to show different landforms and how some of the ecosystems processes work with and around them. I feel that this video encompasses geography as a whole. Seeing the way that the water falls around the mountain made in the video and where it ends up pooling is a good example of natural geography. When looking at the area the lake is now centered a viewer can see where a potential colony or group of people may live in this are. This all depends on closeness to resources such as water, arable land, and potential food supplies. All of this depends on the physical occurrences that you can see in this video. This video also helps to tie in the lesson in class about geomorphology. The creation of dremmels by glaciers, runoff from the mountains, and plate tectonics. These topics can be taught through a power point, but it really helps to see all of this created and the process it takes.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:28 PM
This is a cool way to show the different landforms and the potential use of the surrounding area. It shows us where people could migrate to and start a community and the resources it may have. It also shows the geomorphology of how the landforms were made. I agree with David when he says that these topics can be taught through a power point but to get a real understanding of how they are created and the process it takes, this is the best way to learn.
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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | Geography Education |
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times video highlights two current media campaigns that are in their own struggle to shape the meaning(s) of the word jihad for the American public.  While the definition of "Holy War" is often quoted, it also means a struggle.  When you hear the word jihad, who's jihad do you think of first?  The cultural context within which a word is used might not be the same context in which the message is received and interpreted.  This disconnect can be a part of cultural conflicts and misunderstandings.   


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, USA.

Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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At National Geographic Headquarters

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today I've been at the the National Geographic headquarters in Washington D.C. with other Geography Education Alliance coordinators.  They have the coolest toys to capture some amazing footage, including crittercams.  

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:54 AM

Seen one of these used on mt washington to get aerial footage of people on the summit.

Suggested by C. Kevin Turner!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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"The Farmer"

And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, "I need a caretaker." So God made a farmer. God said, "I need somebody willing to ge...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Super Bowl commercial for trucks also doubles as a tribute to a rural America of yesteryear in general, and for farmers more specifically.  While some may object to the overtly religious references of video, I feel that it reflects the cultural ethos of the Midwest, but more importantly, the market research shows that this religious appeal would resonate with the truck-purchasing demographic that this commercial is trying to influence.  This commercial was cleverly critiqued in this video, "See God made a (Latino) Farmer" and in this irreverant parody.  

Tags: agriculture, labor, rural, unit 5 agriculture.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:04 PM

Religion et société aux EU: un document introductif pour le chapitre, pub du Superbowl 2013, à destination d'un public ciblé... 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:03 PM

This Super Bowl commercial for trucks also doubles as a tribute to a rural America of yesteryear in general, and for farmers more specifically.  While some may object to the overtly religious references of video, I feel that it reflects the cultural ethos of the Midwest, but more importantly, the market research shows that this religious appeal would resonate with the truck-purchasing demographic that this commercial is trying to influence.  This commercial was cleverly critiqued in this video, "See God made a (Latino) Farmer" and in this irreverant parody.  


Tags: agriculture, labor, rural, unit 5 agriculture.

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 

Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 

Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Jamey Kahl's curator insight, March 27, 2016 11:09 PM

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 

Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 

Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria

Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria | Geography Education |
Stratfor Founder and Chairman George Friedman and Chief Geopolitical Analyst Robert D. Kaplan discuss how Bashar al Assad has legitimized his authority over the course of the Syrian conflict.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Stratfor specializes in global intelligence in key geopolitical regions.  Syria certainly fits that description and in this video, the two most public faces of Stratfor discuss the reasons for the Syrian Civil War from and internal perspective and also impacts from a broader outside lens. 

Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | Geography Education |

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of eight videos that are all roughly 5 minutes bring up a variety of topics on on global poverty, development and economic issues that bring in a human element so that these topics are tied to real people and real decisions.  Also see this interactive online game that asks you the question, can you survive extreme poverty?  

Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:24 PM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!


Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:49 PM

The links

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Education |

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map

Seth Dixon's insight:

Have you ever wanted to watch a video and to have a map handy at the same time?  Ever since I first watched Raiders of the Lost Ark, I love the idea of combining video with maps.  I produced this bare-bones map on ArcGIS online to spatially index over 50 videos that I enjoy using in my classes; all are place-specific videos (so they can be ‘located’ on the map).  These videos have also been shared here earlier, but this map can function as a more user-friendly way to search for engaging video clips.  Do you have a great place-based video that teaches the principles of geography that you love?  Please share the URL in the comments section with a brief paragraph.        

Tags: mapping, video, ESRIgeography education.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 


This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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A. R. Wallace: The Other Guy to Discover Natural Selection

This paper-puppet animation celebrates the life of Alfred Russel Wallace, who is co-credited with Charles Darwin for the theory of natural selection.  Read the story here:

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the greatest discoveries in biology began as spatial discoveries.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some amazing advances in biogeography and discovered the appropriately named Wallace Line

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

Kelsey McCartney's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:40 PM

A sweet animation of the wonderful Alfred Russel Wallace, the oft unaknowledged simualtaneous discoverer of evolutionary mechanisms.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:13 PM

Wallace is one person you rarely hear about in the classroom, especially as a person who made a dent in science as a co-founder of natural selection. As someone who did his research in Brazil, Darwin, founder of the Natural Selection theory believed that Wallace may have come across one of his published manuscripts in order to make his claims be known. But one thing Darwin may have missed is how Wallace was reaffirming is scientific claims. 

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Seth Dixon's insight:

The best technologies aren't only the newest and the most expensive.  We are often attracted to the latest and greatest and devalue the tried and true practices out there.  Learning map reading skills is more important than ever. 

Luis Aguilar Cruz's curator insight, July 2, 2013 2:50 AM

Bienvenue à l'expérience map

ethne staniland's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:57 PM

very good

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:29 PM

While technology does has its pros it also comes with its cons. GPS batteries can die; the map on the screen may be unreadable due to size, the GPS itself could break if not handled properly. When it comes to maps, it is durable and legible in any position. However, I can not read a map while driving my car to a certain place. It is rather difficult to find a place when i'm in unfamiliar territory. In this case the GPS is able to direct me to where i need to be. If handled properly, the GPS is, at least in my opinion, better than the map. However, it is nice to keep and extra map in the glove compartment, just in case. 

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good introduction to basic concepts of migration;  the video is especially noteworthy because it is rich in vocabulary terms (explaining them and using global examples) necessary to teach a population geography unit. 

Tags: migration, population, statistics, unit 2 population.

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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APHUG Films Presents...

Promotional video for AP Human Geography enrollment

Via Mr. David Burton
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  Similar videos and things designed to promote the discipline and it's study can be found under the tag, "geo-inspiration." 

Tags: APHG, geo-inspiration.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:37 PM

I need to show this Day 1 of next school year

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Where the Hell is Matt?

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've seen other "Where the Hell is Matt" videos and this recent one is building on that tradition.  These videos show some fantastic international icons and people around the world.  Simultaneously, this video show the unique cultural elements seen around the world while showing the essential beauty of our common humanity.  Who wouldn't want to go to all the places that Matt has been? 

Tags: geo-inspiration, worldwide, folk culture.

GeoBlogs's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:41 AM

Where can you send Matt ?

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Time to scrap “Eastern Europe”

Time to scrap “Eastern Europe” | Geography Education |
Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging 
Seth Dixon's insight:

What places belong in a region together?  What are the boundaries of that region?  How has this region changed over time?  Regional classification is inherently an exercise that relies on our geographic knowledge and requires some spatial thinking.  Each semester I have students divide the United States into the regions that explain how they conceptualize the different parts of the country.  This 2 minute video is a great example that argues that the regional category of Eastern Europe is less meaningful today mainly because of the changing political and economic geography that is blurring the regional borders of Europe.   

Tags:  Europe, regions.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:00 PM

Even though the Iron Curtain has long fallen, the practice of still describing the ex-Soviet countries as "Eastern Europe" still remains, and those same countries wish to change it. No longer are these countries part of the Soviet Block, and they feel that this characterization still defines them in this way. "Eastern Europe" denotes struggling economies, unhappy populations, marginalized lands, and an overall lack of development. While some countries are still recovering from Soviet rule, others have become important world powers with powerful economies. They no longer wish to be associated with Russia.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:58 PM

The old way of lumping all Countries east of Germany as simply "Eastern European" is not only wrong but can lead to negativity and conflict. These are nations which differ greatly in terms of language, ethnicity, and political affiliation should definitely not be lumped together within one identity. The fact is the Cold War has ended and instead of holding on to these out dated terms we should instead look forward and embrace these countries for what they are, unique countries with unique things to offer.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 7:37 PM

I don’t really see the big deal of the map categorization based on the author’s argument. I agree the Cold War labeling is “outdated,” but saying the grouping is “damaging” because people just think of those countries as “poor” is an incredibly weak argument. Anyone who wants to do business with the area will know who is fiscally sound and any country that believes this is an obstacle can easily show the notion false given the facts of the video in regards to wealth and EU membership. However, just because a country is in the EU doesn’t mean they are completely well off. Much of that area is still politically unstable, which is a whole economic value of its own. Furthermore, that wasn’t my connotation of those countries. When I think Cold War, I think of an area that is repressive and still under Russian influence. If anything, I think that is a bigger deal because Russia shouldn’t speak for a whole area.


I also don’t think many of the groupings really help the authors cause. If the author wants there to be less negative connotations related to the Cold War, then the area probably should make mentioned of “countries scared of Russia” as it was the major Cold War player. Nor should there be a mention of “free” economies, since the economic divide of each country played a major hand in the tension between each ideology.  So one really needs to be careful about the terms used when re-labeling an area.


I don’t see a huge push for renaming the area. We still live in an outdated cold war society given how the United States still looks at Russia. So I doubt, renaming will happen anytime soon. Guess the author will have to wait for the next big political crisis or war. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon!

East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Geography Education |
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, Japan, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 


As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.

Scooped by Seth Dixon!

PR Firm Advises U.S. To Cut Ties With Alabama

Emphasizing the importance of protecting the nation’s global image, marketers at the public relations firm Hill & Knowlton Strategies, Inc.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've got nothing but love for the good people of Alabama, but this spoof from the Onion is great.

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Suggested by Tara Cohen!

How The States Got Their Shapes How The States Got Their Shapes: Season 1, Episode 10 "Mouthing Off": Amazon Instant Video
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many have raved about the TV show airing on the History Channel "How the States got their Shapes."  For Amazon Prime users, season 1 is now free to stream.   I'm looking forward to watching this.

Tara Cohen's comment, January 14, 2013 11:33 AM
We show this episode in class to demonstrate standard language, dialects, divergence, isogloss, etc. Once you purchase it through Amazon it remains in your library with unlimited use. It's short enough to show in one class period and the kids really enjoy it.
Seth Dixon's comment, January 14, 2013 10:01 PM
Great ideas Tara. I think that each episode will be filled with applicable teaching materials.