Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."

Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations from Jason Davies mapping project.   


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 4, 5:42 PM

Un site qui permet de visualiser les principales projections cartographiques

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Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

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asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.


The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 25, 7:33 PM
The Cascadia fault line in the Pacific Northwest is one that humans should be afraid of. In January of 1700 the Northwest corner of the [then growing] United States, was hit by an extremely powerful earthquake, which, due to overwhelming geographic evidence, is assumed to be a 9.0 on the current Richter scale. The catastrophic event caused the land, which was already being submerged under the neighboring plate to be further submerged and killed a variety of plant life. After further research, seismologists have predicted that the Cascadia is likely a ticking time bomb and any sudden movement where the tectonic plates are touching could pose quite the problem for modern day America. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, January 25, 7:36 PM
(North America) It's impressive to see the process connecting soil displacement in the North West to a tsunami in 1700 in Japan and to First Nation stories in Canada. It's also impressive, but much bleaker, that we have such specific numbers and a timeline of what will happen if the inevitable earthquake struck the San Andres fault today. Scientists predict 13,000 people will die in the earthquake and resulting tsunami, compared to the 18,000 who died in the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Whenever the Cascadia earthquake strikes, it will probably affect a much larger area of land, displace hundreds of thousands, and cripple the North West's economy.
brielle blais's curator insight, February 11, 9:18 PM
This article showcases the connection between geology and plate tectonics. As physical features of Northern America, the Cascasia subduction zone between the San Andreas plate and Juan de Fuca plate will cause up to a magnitude 8.6 earthquake or higher. This information allows us to prepare for the thousands of possible deaths and displaced people on the west coast and better understand the land and what would be affected by natural disasters.
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The ArcGIS Book

The ArcGIS Book | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Explore ten 'big ideas' that encapsulate the technological and social trends that have pushed geographic information systems (GIS) onto the Internet in a significant way. See how to apply these ideas to your own world. Open your eyes to what is now possible with Web GIS, and put the technology and deep data resources in your hands via the Quickstarts and Learn ArcGIS lessons that are included in each chapter."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2015 2:13 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:30 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

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99 Percent Invisible

Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I’m not ashamed to admit that I love flags; I enjoy thinking about the cultural, economic and geopolitical symbolism embedded in the flags and what that means for the places they represent.  I share the above video for that purpose, but more importantly because it is an introduction to the audio podcast 99 Percent Invisible with a special ‘behind-the-scenes’ peek and how this podcast on flag design was made (and here is a snarky critique of all U.S. state flags).  Great geography resources rarely fall under the title “Geography” with a capital G.  It takes geographic training to “see the geography” in the world around us.  I’ve recently discovered the 99 Percent Invisible Podcast and while it is not explicitly (or even always) geographic, it is loaded with excellent materials about design and the details of the world around us that often go unnoticed, but deserve greater scrutiny.  For example the episodes on the Port of Dallas as well as reversing of the Chicago River show how the physical and human systems intersect within urban areas.  These two geo-engineering projects also were conceived on in very particular social, economic and technological contexts.

I also loved the episode Monumental Dilemma, about the uncomfortable 1800s New England memorialization of Hannah Duston for scalping Native Americans…this is incredibly awkward culturally as our society and social values have changes over the years.  Do we tear it down? Ignore it?  Apologize?  Since the historical legacy is unsettled, so is the monument.  So I’ll keep listening to the 99 Percent Invisible podcast and please recommend some especially geographic past episodes as I dig through the archives.                

 

Tagspodcast, architecture, TED.

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Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This gallery is filled with excellent "teaching images" on human and environmental interactions and all aspects of geography--the one picture above shows how Mexico City has enveloped even the rolling hills as a part of its urban expansion.  


Tags: environmentlandscape, images, environment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, pollution, resourcessustainability.

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SRA's curator insight, April 14, 2015 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

Angela Muster's curator insight, February 21, 2016 12:02 PM

It is important to see pictures like this one to help visualize just how much population, pollution, and consumption are effecting our world. Awareness is vital for change.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Geographic data can be so beautiful...you've got to watch this.  I wish I have seen this when I wrote my National Geographic article on how container ships are transforming the global economy.  

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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale

Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hundreds of churches around Europe have closed or are threatened by plunging membership, posing a question for communities: What to do with the once-holy, now-empty buildings?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Europe, the most developed region in the world, is also the most secular region today.  During colonial times, Europeans were spreading Christianity across the globe, but now Christianity is becoming more a part of Europe's historical landscape.  Secularization can be seen as either the cause or the effect of several other European trends such as declining fertility rates.  Today Europe is filled with historic cathedrals, but there is no one to fill them.


Questions to Ponder: What are other signs of secularization on the cultural landscape?  What would you do with a former sacred site (and an architectural treasure) that is can't be maintained?

 

Tags: culturereligion, Christianity, regions, landscape, Europe.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 2015 8:09 PM

Europe’s Empty churches going on sale is not upsetting to me, unless they are being used as skateboard parks. The main reason to the church’s closings are a rise in secular beliefs. With less people attending and making tributes to the churches they are given no choice but to shut down. These are buildings of great archaic integrity and I think that they should be sold to museums or to state governments as holy sites or something to that effect. These buildings should be preserved because they are a giant standing living history of this world. But as of now skate ramps and parks occupy these churches and may be damaging them. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:25 PM

Empty buildings now turned into just churches used for fun, or by the picture skateboarding. Europe is always known as the power house especially during their colonial period, when they colonized Africa and brought some of their religious beliefs towards the Africans. Europe is filled with big catholic traditions tracing back to the past, but now with this going on its a very sad state seeing something so significant in history in the European community go to waste..

Alexis Rickey's curator insight, Today, 5:52 PM
All throughout Eastern Europe, especially in the Netherlands, hundred of churches have become vacant through the years due to the dropping membership of Christian church-goers. Nearly half, 42.1% of the population in Netherlands have stated that they are unaffiliated with church. Yet, because of the number of vacant churches, many communities are struggling to figure out what to do with them. Many locals that live near these churches have hopes that the buildings will be reinvented into tasteful centers because these buildings hold cultural and historic value. Luckily, a few of these churches are being put to good use. Some smaller churches have been turned into homes,  while some larger churches have been renovated into shopping centers and other community based goods stores. 
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The Best of 2014 GeoEd Style

The Best of 2014 GeoEd Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The best 30 resources and posts on Geography Education from 2014." http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education

Seth Dixon's insight:

'Tis the season to look back on the year that was.  There are some 'Best of' lists with great teaching applications produced this week such as the best satellite images of 2014, the worst natural disasters of 2014, and 50 states in 50 pictures.  This committee of one has analyzed all the Geography Education resources shared this year and selected these 30 as the best, most important, or most useful resources from 2014.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2014 5:48 PM

The best from the BEST!

Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 5, 2015 9:19 AM

'Tis the season to look back on the year that was.  There are some 'Best of' lists with great teaching applications produced this week such as the best satellite images of 2014, the worst natural disasters of 2014, and 50 states in 50 pictures.  Our Alliance Coordinator has analyzed all the Geography Education resources he shared this year and selected these 30 as the best, most important, or most useful resources from 2014.

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For the Love of Maps

For the Love of Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I have a confession to make; I’m a map geek. Even as a kid watching Raiders of the Lost Ark, I was fascinated by the map they used to segue between scenes to show Indiana Jones’ travels.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I hope you enjoy this article; I enjoyed writing it.  I write about my map geekiness (does that surprise anyone out there?), share my place-based videos StoryMap with over 60 of my favorite classroom videos, and why teaching kids to appreciate the value of maps is important.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicmapping, edtech.

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Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:05 AM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

 

This article shows that people often still love maps. Some people grow out of map loving as a teenager and it is not as popular for people to like them anymore. This article tells haw maps are being pushed out of style and how it is hurting our intelligence.

 

This ties into human geography through the fact that it is needed to have a passion for geographical thinking to even get into Human Geography. This shows how not learning about mas can drastically hurt and is drawing away from the geographical field.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:57 PM

Anything by Dr. Seth is worth reading!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:02 AM

I'm taking World Regional Geography because I love maps as well. I am more of a visual learner rather than a verbal learner. In my spare time, I like to map out my dream restaurants and my dream home and turning it into a map itself helps me understand locations in the easiest way. It also helps me identify one area's size and shape in comparison to other's.

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What is Geography?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from the Syracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography educationspatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:37 AM

Prezi created by students interested in the field of geography.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:26 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from theSyracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tags: Anthropocenedevelopment, industryland use, environment, environment modify.  

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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

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Organizing APHG content

Organizing APHG content | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Digital resources to strengthen the quality and quantity of geography education in classrooms the world over."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Since this site is updated daily and organized chronically, finding some of the best posts from the past can be difficult for someone new to the site.  Some of the posts are on current events and not as relevant several years after the fact, but I want to make it easier to find the older posts that are still relevant today more easily accessible.  I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.  Additionally, this Story Map will also guide you on how to get more out of this website.         

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)
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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This website serves as an off-campus host for text, images, data and other web-based resources associated with the free eText, Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm very excited to see a free eText in Human Geography.  I will be looking at this more closely during the next semester and think that geography teachers will see this as a welcome supplemental to their arsenal of resources. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   


Tags: geography educationAPHG, textbook.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, August 13, 2015 7:24 AM

Human Geography

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 13, 2015 8:52 AM

Gracias a Seth Dixon accedo a este texto de acceso libre que es una interesante Introducción a la Geografía Humana. De fácil navegación se puede acceder a valiosa información textual, a imágenes, datos y otros recursos. Es un producto de Steven Graves, profesor de geografía en California State University, Northridge.

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.


Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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Customizable Classroom Maps

Customizable Classroom Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The idea for creating dynamic online teaching maps came up after one of our teacher friends expressed her frustration over how difficult it was to find just the right learning map for particular topic."

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives

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gelatinzoom's comment, June 26, 2015 6:58 AM
Good
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:55 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives. 

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Stratfor's Geographic Challenge Video Series

Stratfor's Geographic Challenge Video Series | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Stratfor provides geopolitical analysis that is relevant for world regional geography classes, especially their 'Geographic Challenge' series. Videos in the 'Geographic Challenge' series are symbolized on this map as RED numbered pushpins, and other regional Stratfor videos are BLUE."  http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT  Also see my map of my favorite geography videos to share in the classroom http://bit.ly/KDY6C2 

Seth Dixon's insight:

I produced this interactive on ArcGIS online to spatially index over 70+ videos from Stratfor, a leader in providing geopolitical intelligence.  This is a great starting point for a student researching a country and some of the issues and challenges that it confronts.       


Tags: mapping, video, ESRIgeography education, geopoliticspolitical.

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The four aspects the geographic advantage (as conceptualized by former AAG president Susan Hanson and solidified by the AAG team--see powerpoint) are:

1.  Relationships between people and the environment

2.  Importance of spatial variability

3.  Processes operating an multiple and interlocking geographic scales

4.  The integration of spatial and temporal analysis

 

To ensure that this advantage is harnessed, the AAG prepared 11 modules within these 4 categories of key issue facing the world:

--Environmental Change

--Sustainability

--Rapid Spatial Reorganization

--Technological Change


Tags unit 1 GeoprinciplesK12STEMsustainability, environment, spatial, technology.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home


Tags: comparison, worldwide, statistics, development.

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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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20 maps that never happened

20 maps that never happened | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Maps of countries, infrastructure projects, and invasions that never were — but might have been.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of these are great examples of counter-factual histories--or the great "what ifs" in history. 


Tagsmapping, historical.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 1, 2015 12:48 PM

20 mapas que nunca exiatieron en la práctica

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:22 AM

I

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:25 AM

Maps of places that would have been transformed by developments that never happened

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The Data-Driven Farm

"Mr. Tom is as much a chief technology officer as he is a farmer. Where his great-great-grandfather hitched a mule, 'we’ve got sensors on the combine, GPS data from satellites, cellular modems on self-driving tractors, apps for irrigation on iPhones,' he said.

The demise of the small family farm has been a long time coming. But for farmers like Mr. Tom, technology offers a lifeline, a way to navigate the boom-and-bust cycles of making a living from the land. It is also helping them grow to compete with giant agribusinesses."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The New York Times article associated with the video above offers a great glimpse into the inner works of how agribusiness technologies have transformed the American family farm.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:41 PM

The New York Times article associated with the video above offers a great glimpse into the inner works of how agribusiness technologies have transformed the American family farm.  

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional). Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this game, you simulate the industrial revolution and have your students design a village that, after 20 rounds of the simulation, will grow to a full-fledged city.  Various teachers have adapted the rules for this game and here are some variants that are saved as a standard webpage, Microsoft Word file, PDF, Powerpoint and Prezi formats. 


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical.

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jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:44 AM

This was the game we played in class!!!

I really enjoyed this game and highly recommend it to future APHUG students because it was fun, informative, and FUN. It really helped me understand how England got really crowded all of the sudden due to the Industrial Revolution. It was a sudden urban sprawl with no  urban planning. My map/ city was a complete mess! 

I hope this game continues to be played as it is a fun introduction to the chaos of the Industrial Revolution. 

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:57 PM

We played this game in our APHUG class. It really simulated how urban development exploded in the industrial revolution. It gives an explanation as to why urban planners at the time had poor design choices because they had little time to plan. They also didn't account for future population growth or new developments in technology. It really shows why today's older cities have poorer designs and more traffic. 

 

This article relates to the Industrial Revolution. It shows the population explosions which occurred as a result and the increased technology during the time. All of these factors of the industrial revolution in England contributed to the quick and poorly designed English cities which led to population overflow. These city planners could not have predicted what would happen or how to plan for more people. They also limited time, money, and resources, as the population just continued to grow and grow. 

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: populationdeclining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

Damon Recagno's curator insight, October 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Here is a quick introduction to the shifting population demographics and why there is a Declining Natural Growth Rate.

 

This video is a good way of introducing the topic of Cities and Countries Methods for Tackling a Declining Natural Growth Rate because it provides insight on why many locations around the world are currently experiencing a declining natural growth rate.

Teresa Morante Arona's comment, October 13, 2017 9:35 PM
Gret Video, but why do you think there is such a diverse shift in population demographics?
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Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems

Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An animated map of global wind and weather. Join the Facebook community.  Seen here are the dual menaces, Cyclone Hudhud and Typhoon Vongfong (as seen from ISS)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  This visualization of global weather conditions is updated every three hours from supercomputer data projections.  Click on the 'earth' text in the lower left-hand corner to customize the display.  For examining the wind patterns and oceans currents, this is much more useful than Google Earth; this is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

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Pam Anderson's curator insight, October 12, 2014 11:48 AM

this might interest some of our teachers who are studying weather With their students.  I just think this site is fascinating!