Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities

Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The days of easy growth in the world’s cities are over, and how they respond to demographic shifts will influence their prosperity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some cities throughout Africa and Asia have experienced spectacular growth.  Europe, on the other isn't see the same level of growth and is even experiencing urban decline in a few regions. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in these maps?  What cultural, demographic and economic factors explain some of the regional patterns in these maps?        

 

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Battle Cry for the Bodega

Battle Cry for the Bodega | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why the chainification of the corner store is a bigger deal than losing book stores and record stores combined.

 

The term Bodega originally referred to a neighborhood grocery in a mostly Spanish-speaking part of town, it has come to be used (in my experience) to cover just about any independently owned small grocer in the city. The fear is that the corporate behemoth (7-Eleven) will destroy the neighborhood bodega, a New York institution of long standing. The quintessential bodega is a beloved part of the fabric of the city.  The outcry has been loudest in the East Village, a neighborhood that despite gentrification still prides itself on its countercultural attitude and grimy authenticity.

Seth Dixon's insight:

When we discuss food deserts, we typically think about places that lack supermarkets.  In an urban context, the places that often fill this void are the bodegas.  In some major cities, these are going away as chains like 7-Eleven want to expand their reach and squeeze out these independent grocers. However you view this issue, “There’s no denying that the texture of the city would be flattened if the idiosyncratic bodega became an endangered species.”

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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The Most Popular Running Routes in the 20 Biggest U.S. Metro Areas

The Most Popular Running Routes in the 20 Biggest U.S. Metro Areas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
These are the top running routes in the 20 biggest metro areas in the United States, according to Strava data.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm a big advocate of running/mapping apps for my own personal training (I use Map My Run and Strava).  These maps were created with raw data from Strava to show the most popular urban runs in the US.   Prominent on this list are urban parks, scenic waterfronts, and retrofitted railways...in other words, successful urban planning that has helped to foster a strong sense of place.

    

Tags: urban, place, neighborhood, planning, urbanism.

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Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The world is experiencing rapid urbanisation, but not every city is growing. Population is likely to decline in 17% of large cities in developed regions and 8% of cities across the world from 2015 to 2025, according to a McKinsey report."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic series of maps for human geography and regional geography classes. Some cities throughout Africa and Asia have experienced spectacular growth (click here for 5 infographics showing East Asia's massive urban growth).  Europe, on the other isn't see the same level of growth and is even experiencing urban decline in a few regions.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in these maps?  What cultural, demographic and economic factors explain some of the regional patterns in these maps?        

 

Tags: APHG, urban, unit 7 cities, megacities.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 11:59 AM
unit 7
James Hardie's curator insight, April 17, 2017 9:12 PM

Geographical skills and concepts: place / space / scale / change 

Geographical knowledge: "Causes and consequences of urbanisation, drawing on a study from Indonesia, or another country of the Asia region (ACHGK054)" 

Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 23, 5:34 PM
This is a really cool visual representation of urban populations throughout the world.  While urban centers in most regions are stagnating or even declining, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa are three regions seeing steady growth.  What short-term and long-term effects will these patterns have on societies and economies around the globe?
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Quiz: identify the cities from their running heatmaps

Quiz: identify the cities from their running heatmaps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Smartphones and GPS watches now leave digital traces behind many urban runners, as they wind their way along the river or round the park. Can you identify the cities from the telltale tracks?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last year, my running program was greatly enhanced by using a mapping app(I know, who could have guessed that Map My Run and Strava would help keep me motivated and inspired?).  More runners are naturally going to be on more important roads, but they also love beautiful parks and runs along the water.  With that in mind, can you identify these ten cities from around the world based on the density of running routes?  You can explore your city's raw data on Strava

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Providence area sees biggest shift away from manufacturing jobs in US

Providence area sees biggest shift away from manufacturing jobs in US | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A new study illustrates just how drastically employment has plunged in Rhode Island’s historic industrial base over recent decades. Since 1980, the Providence metropolitan area has experienced the largest shift in the country away from manufacturing jobs and into work requiring college degrees, according to a paper by Stephan Whitaker, a research economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. “In 1980, 40% of workers in the Providence metro area worked in manufacturing and 25% worked in degree-intensive fields,” Whitaker writes. “By 2014, manufacturing had dropped to just 11%, and degree-intensive jobs had risen to 47%.”

 

Tags: urbanindustrymanufacturinglabor, economic, Rhode Island.

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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 2017 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
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America's 'Megaregions' using Commuter Data

America's 'Megaregions' using Commuter Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New maps use math to define the amorphous term.
Seth Dixon's insight:

By now I'm sure many of you have seen some iteration of this research and data visualization circulating through social media outlets (you can see the article from City Lab, Atlas Obscura or an urban planning program).  We use terms like the greater metropolitan area to express the idea that areas beyond the city boundaries and even beyond the metropolitan statistical areas are linked with cities.  These 'mega-regions' are in part the hinterlands of a city, a functional region where the cities act as hubs of economic regions.   

Tags: regions, urban, transportationeconomicvisualization, mapping, USA, planning.

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Boris Limpopo's curator insight, December 11, 2016 1:43 AM
Le macroregioni americane con i dati del pendolarismo
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:53 AM
Plenty of space in the middle it seems
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'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts

'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Providence, once the heart of the New England mafia, was chosen for the first season. The approximately 17 to 20 episodes will follow the patterns of corruption in Rhode Island up through the banking crisis of RISDIC, the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice, and City Hall corruption in Operation Plunder Dome."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not just a fascinating local story of my new hometown; this is a riveting portrayal of the urban social geographies of organized crime, corruption, and the cosa nostra.  With only three episode to date, they with entertain and inform listeners with delving into the inner working of the mob (and just a heads up--the language will be crass and actual crimes will be discussed--don't say I didn't warn you).  To be honest, of course season one of Crimetown dad to been about Providence, and it is all the more compelling knowing the neighborhoods that are being shaped in this historical portrayal of Rhode Island.    

 

Tagsurban, crime, Rhode Island, neighborhood, socioeconomic, poverty, podcast.

 

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Alexander peters's curator insight, December 13, 2016 12:24 PM
This was about the tv show that is about the new england mafia. I have watched the show
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The 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities on the Planet

The 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities on the Planet | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Investment in bicycle infrastructure is a modern and intelligent move. Many cities get this. Many don't.

 

Tags: urbanplace, transportationplanning, urbanism, architecture.

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joellemillery's curator insight, August 28, 2016 5:28 AM
In Munich, bike paths feel overcrowded, for example, there is a need for a new #urbanism #transportation # plan ;-)
malek's comment, September 6, 2016 10:09 AM
@pdeppisch Montreal made it 20 !!
pdeppisch's comment, September 6, 2016 7:23 PM
I have friends, she is Quebecois, and they are in fact doing a bicycle tour of Montréal and surroundings. Toronto, of course, did not. I lived in Montreal from '53 to '86. :)
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The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

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Bolivian Commuters Soar Through The Sky

"The world's biggest urban gondola system, known as Mi Teleférico, opened in La Paz, Bolivia, in May 2014. The 6-mile-long system is an engineering feat."

 

Tags: transportation, South America, Bolivia, urban, planningarchitecture.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 26, 2016 7:14 PM
The gondola system of La Paz, Bolivia called Mi Teleferico,  addresses the transport challenge in a large and unplanned city already overcrowded with vehicles and facing steep terrain. This short video provides a great overview of the creative response to a transport challenge and the background images provide a view of what the city is like.
Alexis Rickey's curator insight, February 8, 5:55 PM
Bolivia creatively found a new way of transportation for the public people that works around it's heavily condensed physical geography. With the creation of the world's biggest urban gondola system, public commuters can now get to needed and desired destinations via skylines. The system, which began operation in May 2014, now transports over a million people monthly, with a ride costing 40 cents (rides are half off for students, children and the elderly). The gondola system is expecting to expand it's six mile long system with four new lines in the near future. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 10, 7:24 PM
An interesting look at how urban geography and physical geography pose problems that lead to creative solutions! La Paz, Bolivia, is an example of an unplanned city, with a maze of narrow streets that is nearly impossible to navigate.  Combined with the hilliness of the area, it is complicated to get around in this city.  Their innovative gondola system circumvents the irregular streets and hills by simply carrying passengers *over* them.
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Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures

Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Cities are mankind’s most enduring and stable mode of social organization, outlasting all empires and nations over which they have presided. Today cities have become the world’s dominant demographic and economic clusters."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  This main point of the book and article is that economic and social connectivity is the new driving force is of geopolitics, not just global economics.  Supply chains matter more than borders and the largest cities are the controlling nodes of those supply chains.  

 

Tags: political, globalization, urbaneconomic.

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Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 2016 1:22 AM
Rare insight into the changes of the economic climate of the world. Fantastic for use in unit focused around mapping and the changing distributions of the world by asking students to think outside the boundaries of traditional maps and what future maps could possibly look like and have them map their ideas as to why their maps look the way they do with research to enforce their ideas.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 11, 4:37 PM
In this article, the author argues that cities are not only where people tend to gather, but are where the economy flourishes. In cities in the Chinese Pearl River Delta, Boston, San Fransisco, and Dallas, we see greater connections and higher GDP than in non-mega city areas
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Alexander peters's curator insight, April 11, 2017 9:07 AM
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse

Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The death toll from a collapse at a landfill outside Ethiopia’s capital has risen sharply to 113, an Addis Ababa city official said Wednesday, as the country began three days of mourning for victims who were mostly women and children. Saturday’s collapse of a mountain of garbage buried makeshift mud-and-stick homes inside the Koshe landfill on the outskirts of the capital."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some geographies are uncomfortable to discuss because they expose some of the social and spatial inequalities that we wish weren't part of economic geographies.

 

Questions to Ponder: Why did this happen?  Why were so many people in the landfill?  

 

Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development, urbanpoverty, squatter.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 2017 9:31 AM
unit 6
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 31, 3:36 PM
When I think of dumps or garbage I usually don’t think of them being deadly.  Unfortunately in Addis Ababa, part of the dump collapsed and 113 people ended up dying.  Not only did the collapse injure people, but it also wiped out the homes that surround the area.  The lack of codes about infrastructure in the city is most likely the cause of this incident.  There were no regulations about how garbage had to be dumped in order to keep it from collapsing.  There were also no rules about how homes should be built or where they could be built.  This article points out that there were attempts made in order to stop dumping at this particular landfill, but the dumping was resumed right before the collapse.  The government also relocated some of the residents that lived by the dump, but were not able to move everyone before the accident.  Although efforts were made to avoid a situation like this, the government wasn’t forceful or fast enough to prevent it.  Many of the victims of this were women and children which is telling of the culture of the city.  The women and children scavenge the landfill in order to find things they can either repurpose for themselves or sell to make money.  The last section of the article also says that Ethiopia prides itself as being one of Africa’s fastest growing economies.  But this incident shows that they still have a ways to go before they can become a more developed country.
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 5, 3:26 PM
Inside the Koshe landfill in Ethiopia, there were makeshift mud and stick homes.  Residents say the collapse the has killed over a hundred residents could have been because of protests at another landfill and some blamed the construction at a new waste to energy plant at Koshe.  families who lost loved ones haverecieved or will receive any where from $430 to $650 each and will be resettled permanently in the coming years.  It is sad to see people living like this but most of all to see a government allow such situations to exist.
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Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A host of environmental factors are threatening to push a crowded capital toward a breaking point."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Urban ecology, environmental justice, gendered inequities, primate city politics, the struggle of growing megacities…it’s all here in this fantastic piece of investigative reporting.  The article highlights the ecological problems that Mexico City faces (high-altitude exacerbates air pollution, interior drainage worsens water pollution, limited aquifers that are overworked lead to subsidence, importing water outside of the basin requires enormous amounts of energy, etc.).  just because the article doesn't use the word 'geography' doesn't mean that it isn't incredibly geographic. All of these problems are at the heart of human-environmental nexus of 21st century urbanization. 

   

Tags: urban, megacities, water, environment, Mexico.

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Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 3, 2017 8:45 AM

Urban ecology, environmental justice, gendered inequities, primate city politics, the struggle of growing megacities…it’s all here in this fantastic piece of investigative reporting.  The article highlights the ecological problems that Mexico City faces (high-altitude exacerbates air pollution, interior drainage worsens water pollution, limited aquifers that are overworked lead to subsidence, importing water outside of the basin requires enormous amounts of energy, etc.).  just because the article doesn't use the word 'geography' doesn't mean that it isn't incredibly geographic. All of these problems are at the heart of human-environmental nexus of 21st century urbanization. 

   

Tags: urban, megacities, water, environment, Mexico.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 7, 10:44 AM
Mexico City sinking is what climate change looks like. This city is sinking due to lack of water coming into the city and the government drilling into the ground to try and get more water, the problem with this is that the ground they are drilling into is weak which is causing the city to sink. The potential risks Mexico City sinking could cause are astronomical. Mexico is not a first world country, but it is a second world country with a lot of manufacturing being done there. If the city sinks it could drastically affect the rest of the country. Mexico City being the only "big" city in the country makes the whole country very dependent upon its success, it sinking could cause the whole country to sink with it. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 8, 1:04 PM
(Mexico/Central America) Mexico city seems to be built in the worst way possible. The original Aztec architects could not imagine the locational problems the city faces today. Originally built on an island, Spanish conquerors drained the lakes and created an inland, mountainous position that causes the city to sink inches every year. Ironically, the city is now forced to use underground water sources or expensively import drinking water and poor locals can rarely count on tap water. The uneven clay and volcanic soil foundation and climate change further drives subsidence of this unplanned metropolis. Climate change will also create a series of floods and droughts and the inefficient sewage and water system will lead to devastation.
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Water worlds: can you guess the city from the river?

Water worlds: can you guess the city from the river? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Designer Alex Szabo-Haslam has stripped out the street names and highlighted the water features around 11 world cities. Can you identify them?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fun map quiz that is part memory, but also relies on pattern recognition to see if you can understand the urban morphology that shaped these places. 

 

Tags: urbanfluvial, trivia, games.

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Special Economic Zones

Special Economic Zones | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are the most rapidly spreading kind of city, having catapulted exports and growth from Mauritius and the Dominican Republic to Shenzhen and Dubai -- and now across Africa. Today more than 4000 SEZs dot the planet, a major indication of our transition towards the "supply chain world" explored in Connectography.  See more maps from Connectography and order the book here."

 

Tags: globalizationurban, economicindustry, regions.

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Paris mayor unveils plan ​to restrict traffic and pedestrianize city center

Paris mayor unveils plan ​to restrict traffic and pedestrianize city center | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Anne Hidalgo says she wants to cut the number of cars in French capital by half as part of campaign to tackle pollution
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world's biggest cities are struggling to maintain access to congested downtown areas and still ensure that the downtown maintains it's historic sense of place that generate so much tourism and concentration of cultural amenities.  Pollution is driving cities to change as the private automobile as the default mode of transportation becomes less feasible and unsustainable as cities expand to be far larger than they ever have been before.  

 

Tags: urban, environmentpollution, urban ecology, France, place, tourism, Paris, megacities, transportation.

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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, February 6, 10:02 AM
Traffic, nobody likes to hear that word, but we are always unable to avoid it. In any major city traffic is a way of life, but how can we control it. The Mayor or Paris Anne Hidalgo has been looking for a way to limit the amount of the cars in the city or find a way to diverge traffic to some areas. Some of the reasons behind it are to address pollution issues in a city that has seen incredible increase in population and a rise in cars, which obviously gives way pollution. However, it will take time to improve public transportation and they can divert traffic as much as possible, however people still need to be able to get to work and from place to place. Also for foreigners  on vacation in Paris, obviously a popular place to go, how do you deal with population problems and vacationers?  Tourism is very important for Paris and there is a few concerns with cars, first off if the city becomes overtaken by smog that is never a good thing. Second, if you divert traffic to areas it may confuse travelers, and thirdly if you make major changes to roads or buildings do you change the beautiful landscape of Paris? These issues will be challenges for many Mayors or government officials all over the world, sadly there is not an easy answer. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2:05 PM
In an effort to clear some of the traffic in Paris, the mayor has created plans that will prevent some of the traffic in the country’s capital city. She is making these plans because of the pollution that covers the city. By getting rid of half of the traffic, having an electric tram, and introducing more bike lanes, mayor Anne Hidalgo is planning to make the city “green”.
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How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker

How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Jane Jacobs lacked formal training in city planning but became an urban visionary who promoted dense, mixed-use neighborhoods where people interacted on the streets. She also became the nemesis of New York master builder Robert Moses. On our inaugural episode, we’ll explore Jacobs’ legacy and how the ideas and ideals of 'St. Jane' hold up today."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How do you create a sense of place?  How can you make a neighborhood more vibrant and meaningful to the residents?  These are questions that central to city planners, community organizers, activists, home owners, renters, business owners, and a wide range of local stakeholders.  The Placemakers podcast has many episodes on these topics worth listening to, starting with the one about Jane Jacobs, a leading urbanist who was a proponent of “The Cheerful Hurly-Burly” of the “zoomed in” city life who fought against Robert Moses’ more sterile “zoomed out” spaces of transportation flows.  In another podcast titled “the quest for the perfect place,” the series explores new urbanism and the ideas that have shaped the movement.

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, podcastscale.

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America's Wealth Is Staggeringly Concentrated in the Northeast Corridor

America's Wealth Is Staggeringly Concentrated in the Northeast Corridor | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"At the county level, America is a tremendously unequal place."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The concentration of wealth within U.S. cities is one of the most powerful geographic patterns in North America (and remains of of the key geographic stories of the 2016 presidential election). NYC served as a hub for the import/export of primary economic resources during the 18th and 19th centuries as the Erie Canal opened up the interior of the United States to become part of NYC's hinterland.  NYC expanded as a hub for the manufacturing of consumer products and then began to transition to a more tertiary based economy. “There are more than 3,000 counties in the U.S. Of the 75 with the highest incomes, 44 are located in the Northeast, including Maryland and Virginia. The corridor of metropolitan statistical areas that runs from Washington, D.C., through Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and Boston includes 37 of these top-earning counties (where the median family takes home at least $75,000 a year)."

 

Tags: urbanindustrymanufacturinglabor, economic, NYC, Washington DC. Boston.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:54 AM
UK wealth is in South East
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 18, 2016 12:00 AM

Influences on settlement patterns. 

Where is Australia's population concentrated? 

Syllabus
Students investigate differences in urban settlement patterns between Australia and another country, for example:
- examination of urban settlements to determine patterns of concentration
- explanation of factors influencing urban concentration eg climate and topography, transportation networks, land use or perceptions of liveability
- assessment of the consequences of urban concentrations on the characteristics, liveability and sustainability of places


Geoworld 9 NSW
Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and the USA
7.1 Population concentrated near coasts
7.3 Is Australia a nation of tribes?
7.4 Nature in control
7.5 Coastal colonial cities and ports
7.6 USA: Settlement, geography and history
7.7 Large cities: Contrasting patterns
7.8 Sprawling suburbs: similar patterns
7.9 Consequences of urban concentration

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Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities

Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An American used drones to capture the color lines still stark in South African cities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In some respects this isn't surprising, but it is still striking to see how stark the differences are.  One generation of political change does not reverse generations of systemic racism that have had economic, cultural, and political impacts.  Many of the urban planning decisions were based on apartheid, and that historical legacy is still embedded landscape.

 

Tags: South Africa, images, Africarace, ethnicityneighborhood, urban, planning, images, remote sensing.

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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 9, 10:13 AM
"I agree with you, I think that the images are chilling. And they communicate so well what is otherwise a very complicated and nuanced issue to discuss—separation, segregation, history, disenfranchisement. But the images cut right to the heart of the matter, which is that these separations are not right" This is a quote in the article from the man that took the pictures (Johnny Miller). These photos show us the lines of segregation that continues even in a post Apartheid South Africa. These are amazing images and really quite unbelievable. We think of different segregation here in America, but what these photos show are unlike anything that I have personally seen.  As stated in the article the author hopes to create conversations about these separations. We see planned spatial separations that we created by city planners and we must used these as lessons going forward and as jumping off points to discuss. These shocking images can help inform us as a society that we must improve our social issues and if we don't we will continue to see issues like this grow both here in South Africa and around the world. One can see while tensions would be so high as a clear divide in living standards can rightfully cause anger. Eventually this anger leads to hate and this hate leads to an up rise in the people. 
Alexis Rickey's curator insight, March 28, 10:28 PM
These aerial drone images show South Africa's underlying cultural and historical landscapes through it's clearly evident neighborhood divisions. These divisions in the urban ecology of the neighborhoods show that they were built during different political movements. One side represents an upbringing during a time of a systematically enforced racial segregation, known has apartheid, which later became an abolished practice in the early 90s due to western governments seeing it as a terrorist organization.  
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 31, 4:23 PM
South Africa is one of the few countries that has a similar history in regards to racial segregation as America.  What makes their case unique is that the African population was there first and the English came in and created a system in which they were superior.  Although they have been officially desegregated for almost 20 years, these photos show that there are still underlying issues that exist.  These photos reveal that on one side of a particular area, the homes look like a typical suburban area where right across from that there are areas that resemble slums.  The areas that are more developed and wealthy have a majority white population and the poorer, less developed areas have large black populations.  The affects of segregation are long lasting and not solved overnight.  Just because government policies say that discrimination on a racial basis is illegal, doesn’t mean that society will neatly reorganize itself.  I think that the craziest part of this for me was that even the landscaping is vastly different despite the closeness of the two areas.  The wealthier part has lush green and the poorer parts have dirt and sand.  This an example of physical geography providing evidence for a societal separation.
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The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

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Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

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London Should Secede From the United Kingdom

London Should Secede From the United Kingdom | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beyond the stunning act that has become Britain’s vote to leave the European Union lies a deeper message: Democracy is not destiny, but devolution. Ceaseless entropy — the second law of thermodynamics — applies to politics as well. The more countries democratize, the more local populations seek greater self-rule.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  Using those ideas, Khanna discusses London's options after the recent Brexit vote in this op-ed (this additional article explores the demographic divide on the Brexit vote, especially how many British Millennials feel that their future has been snatched from them).      

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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 18, 7:40 PM

In this article, Parag Khanna argues exactly what the title suggests, "London should secede from the United Kingdom". In light of the UK's decision to leave the European Union, Khanna discusses that "Londoners... voted by a wide majority to 'remain' in the EU" and suggests that many Londoners have lost their sense of British Pride after the secession. Though it is mentioned that the city "can't and won't" leave the country, the exit from the EU directly impacts London's economy because "immigrants are essential for the city’s financial and education sectors". Without the immigrants, the city's finances will not only be in jeopardy, but its connection between foreign places will be impacted as well. 

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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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