Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal

Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya.

 

Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

The lidar system fires rapid laser pulses at surfaces and measures how long it takes that light to return to sophisticated measuring equipment. Doing that over and over again lets scientists create a topographical map of sorts. Months of computer modeling allowed the researchers to virtually strip away half a million acres of jungle that has grown over the ruins. What's left is a surprisingly clear picture of how a 10th-century Maya would see the landscape.

Tags: lidar, spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciplesGuatemala, Middle America.

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Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 8:55 PM
This article is not only about our expanding knowledge of Mayan civilization, although it is fascinating that experts are learning more about the cultural and historical geography of Guatemala.  It also highlights some problems that physical geography can sometimes pose to researchers, and the solutions that are becoming possible because of improving technology.  Archaeologists, rather than hiking through dense forests on the off chance of happening upon something recognizable as an ancient structure, can now use laser imaging to see past the overgrowth.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 14, 9:50 PM
This article is particularly interesting because it not only claims to change the way we think of the Mayans, but it also describes the methods used for unearthing the ruins of a civilization that has been lost. By using the Lidar system, archaeologists were able to discover a city with thousands of houses, pyramids and other buildings.
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:57 PM
Archaeologists are using new high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools to discover Mayan structures that have gone undetected for hundreds of years. This new method for archaeology has proved very successful as well, since tens of thousands of hidden Mayan structures have been detected using these new tools. This helps paint a different picture of what Mayan civilization was really like. For example, archaeologists now believe that the Mayan civilization may have had a population two to three times the size originally estimated and a much larger extension of land than previously thought. At the end of this article, what really made me think was how the Guatemalan jungle once hindered archaeologists from discovering Mayan structures, but now the jungle is seen as useful in preserving these structures over time, so they are not destroyed by people. It seems as though there is still much to learn about the Mayan civilization and their culture.
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The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior

The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The highly anticipated event is casting a long shadow online.

 

The upcoming solar eclipse is poised to become the “most photographed, most shared, most tweeted event in human history,” in the words of one astronomer. Millions of people will watch it, potentially overwhelming the cities and towns along the eclipse's path of totality.

According to Google, interest in the eclipse has exploded nationwide in the past few months, mirroring national media attention. The county-level search data above, provided by Google, paints a striking picture: Interest in the eclipse is concentrated in the path of totality that cuts through the middle of the country, receding sharply the farther you go from that path.

 

Tags: Sunspace, media

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Reality can be a Matter of Perspective

"Human eyes could be easier to trick than you might think. A Japanese professor, Kokichi Sugihara, created sculptures that trick the mind to see the impossible. He was the winner of the Best Illusion of the Year Contest in 2010 and 2nd place in 2016."

 

Tags: spatial, perspective. 

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Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business?

Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The showrooms appear to always be empty -- how do they stay open?
Seth Dixon's insight:

It is a sorry state of affairs when voters are tired of hearing about the U.S. presidential candidates and would prefer to discuss the seemingly inexplicable proliferation of mattress stores.  Seriously though, this is a good example of a spatial question that explains things about the world. 

 

Tagsspatial, industry, economic.

 

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Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See

Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“Geography is linked to the environment,” says Connie Wyatt Anderson, of Canadian Geographic Education. “In the Lake Winnipeg watershed, what you throw into the Bow River in Calgary eventually ends up in Hudson Bay.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


TagsCanada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:29 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

Niall Conway's curator insight, March 16, 2016 1:38 PM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:36 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

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Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps

Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While many skills have become obsolete in the digital age, map reading remains an important tool for building children's spatial reasoning skills and helping them make sense of our world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

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ApocalypseSurvival's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:15 AM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

ThePlanetaryArchives/San Francisco CA's curator insight, March 11, 2016 6:25 PM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 13, 2016 6:53 AM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

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Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 


Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  


That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."


Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planningspatial, scale, historical.

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Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.


Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."


Tags: technologyfood production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.

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Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

Samuel bennett's curator insight, January 10, 2017 11:50 AM

In this article it talks about the development of agriculture  and how most of it started. This article relates to my world cultural geography class by telling how people used agriculture to provide for themselves and better there methods year after year. The use of technology and the pesticides they used to help there crops grow is similar  in our class to the was technology was developed and helped out a lot in the fields and in everyday life.

Alanna Thompson's curator insight, January 10, 2017 1:17 PM

This is very interesting insight on how farmers use precision agriculture to customize how they cultivate each square foot of their fields. In my opinion precision agriculture is a good way for farmers to know exactly what they need to do to their field and what they should plant. It also is a way for them to make sure none of the areas within their field underperform. 

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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Get students thinking about patterns and the 'why's' of history with a focus on the geography and movement behind the historical story.  This is the link to some of the digital maps that can help you put history in it's place.  For more lesson plans, click here


Tags: historical, USA, mappingspatial, GIS,  ESRI, edtech.

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Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2015 2:09 AM
Is this new technology
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 5:20 PM

These maps help show different patterns in the United States throughout different periods of American history such as during the Civil War, the locations of the first railroads, difference in the North and South, and also mapping the constitutional convention. it really help put it all in a geographical perspective. 

This helps create a focus on the movement of people, the "whys" of history, and the different political states and counties we have made over the years.  

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:39 PM

Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps-

This article explains how GIS can be used multiple ways, whether it be in location, past, present, or predictions on the future. These GIS examples show how  the American Civil War and many other things would have been seen as.

This article demonstrates the use of geospatial technologies by showing how American history would be like if represented by GIS.

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MOOC: The Location Advantage

"Business graduates, students, and professionals can sign up today for a free online course to get the Location Advantage."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Location Advantage is a free MOOC that will be offered by Esri in May 2015. It will last six weeks (2-3 hours of study per week).  Registered students will learn how to collect, analyze, and visualize business datasets.  You can register online for The Location Advantage.


Tagsmappingspatial, training, GIS,  ESRI, edtech, geospatial, location.

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When disaster strikes, FEMA turns to Waffle House

When disaster strikes, FEMA turns to Waffle House | Geography Education | Scoop.it
FEMA has coined a "Waffle House Index" to indicate the severity of a disaster.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A proxy variable is an easily measurable variable that is used in place of a variable that cannot be measured or is difficult to measure. The proxy variable can be something that is not of any great interest itself, but has a close correlation with the variable of interest.  So if you can't order waffles after a big storm at Waffle House might not matter in the big scheme of things, but as this podcast demonstrates, it is a good indicator that the region has been serious impacted by a natural disaster--they are the canary in the coal mine that FEMA is using to help plan their relief efforts.  This is in part because Waffle House's core area is in the South and is has a wide spatial network.

   

Tags: disastersstatistics, the South, regions, podcast.

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Katie's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:15 PM

This article is about how reliable and customer friendly the restaurant Waffle House is. After natural disasters like, an ice storm the Waffle House is always open to serve food to the community. This is an example of the amount of accessibility to food stores in a community. 

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:55 PM

Unit 6

If you can't order waffles after a big storm at Waffle House might not matter in the big scheme of things, but as this podcast demonstrates, it is a good indicator that the region has been serious impacted by a natural disaster--they are the canary in the coal mine that FEMA is using to help plan their relief efforts.  This is in part because Waffle House is in the South and is has a wide spatial network.

Christina Caruso's curator insight, February 9, 5:21 PM
The Waffle House you can only find in the south states.  Where a lot of disasters happen like hurricanes.  If a Waffle house is closed then there is a seriously issues 
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Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis

Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A shortage of developable land have pushed Hong Kong's housing prices skyward, leading some to live in spaces the size of closets.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Overpopulation doesn't feel like a serious issue when you live in a land characterized by wide open spaces, but in some densely settled urban centers, the issues become quite personal.  Hong Kong is currently facing a housing shortage. This article nicely explains the difficulties that living in the so-called coffin homes makes for the residents.  This photo gallery humanizes this difficult living condition.

 

Tags: housingurban, place, neighborhoodspatialdensity, planning, density, urbanism.

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HumdeBut's curator insight, February 6, 8:54 AM
Hopefully we have more space in Europe and elsewhere (Canada !).
For me, living in these conditions : non !!!
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 8:35 PM
The photo gallery in this article helps to give an accurate depiction of the housing crisis in Hong Kong with many people living in units that are 4 by 6 feet. Many families have to live in separate units because they are so small and can't usually fit more than one person. The bright side of the housing crisis in Hong Kong is that these "coffin homes" allow people to live in the major city at a cheaper cost, although it definitely comes with a hefty price with such tiny living quarters. The future looks positive though, as Hong Kong promises to build over 400,000 new homes over the next decade. This will help improve the housing crisis and hopefully phase these "coffin homes" out of existence once and for all.
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 9:31 AM
Now this is a major housing crisis. I thought apartments in NYC were small, but nothing like this. In Hong Kong they have what is called "coffin homes" they are stacked on top of each other to try to fit as many in as possible. With increasing population and just 7% of the land properly zoned for housing it caused a major crunch in the housing market. Currently prices are going for $1,350 per square foot. Obviously this is a major problem and causes living conditions to be brutal especially for the elderly or for families that have to split up due to space. So what to do to fix this problem? Well one would say just make more land available for housing, well that comes with problems as well. There probably is a reason that there is limited land for housing due to geographical issues. So yes we can build more homes, but would we run into new problems such as natural disasters that cause more debt for the people in the country. There definitely needs to be a solution for these people, but it might not be so simple. I will never go back to NYC now and say how small the apartments are, because well you could be in Hong Kong.
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Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes

Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s no secret that the Great Lakes are suffering tremendous ecological strain — Lake Erie was even pronounced “dead” for a time during the 1960s because of an overload of phosphorus from municipal waste. Back in 1615, though, when the entire region was pristine and explorers Samuel de Champlain and Étienne Brûlé gazed out together from Lake Huron’s shores, they dubbed it la mer douce, 'the sweet sea.' Today roughly one-quarter of Canada’s population and a 10th of America’s population drink from the Great Lakes basin; the beleaguered lakes alone hold more than a fifth of Earth’s freshwater."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  How does this similar map shed more light on these issues?  

 

TagsCanada, environment, resources, waterspatial, scale

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 15, 2017 11:52 AM
These lakes are a tremendous resource, not only for the region but the nation as well. They need our attention and protection.-Lou 
 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 8, 9:58 PM
It is amazing, in a sad way, to see how in just four centuries these lakes have gone from "la mer douce" to "dead." This map is a reminder of the damage humans do to the environment on a daily basis, and of the importance of protecting our natural resources.  Considering the fact that these lakes hold roughly one fifth of all of the fresh water on the planet and provide drinking water for millions of people in both the U.S. and Canada, we need to think about the impact we have on the world around us and how that impact can come back to bite us on the rear end.
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Petra, Jordan: Huge monument found 'hiding in plain sight'

Petra, Jordan: Huge monument found 'hiding in plain sight' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Two archaeologists, who recently published their findings in the American Schools of Oriental Research, used Google Earth satellite images and drone photography to identify the outline of an enormous monument buried beneath sand and time at the UNESCO World Heritage site in Jordan."  --Motherboard

Seth Dixon's insight:

When in the Mexican state of Veracruz as a grad student, I saw a startling mountain covered by the dense tropical rain forest; this mountain had a consistent slope with hard angles.  I was awestruck to realize that it was an uncovered (but not undiscovered) pyramid and I wondered just how many archeological sites are waiting to be unearthed. 

 

Why is a geographer an important member of an interdisciplinary team? This discovery shows that spatial thinking, geographic tools, and a keen eye for usually patterns in unexpected places are critical for many disciplines and fields of research.

 

Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, MiddleEast, Jordan, googleunit 1 GeoPrinciples.  

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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 29, 3:38 PM
(Middle East) Using modern technology, archaeologists have discovered a new monument hidden underground in Petra. The find, dated around 150 B.C., is thought to be a ceremonial site with two platforms, pottery. columns, and a staircase carved out of stone. It is amazing that there are still new finds like this in the 21st century, but the history of the Middle East is so incredibly old, with so many extinct civilizations, that archaeologists will probably keep making new breakthroughs.
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 4:40 PM
Physical geography can be really cool as understanding the current land helps to also understand the past. Researchers finding new monuments like this in Petra shows the importance of knowing the land around you, or someplace important like where the UNESCO World Heritage Site. 
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Doreen Massey on Space

Doreen Massey on Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In honor of the late Doreen Massey, an eminent geographer who died Friday at age 72, we repost her Social Science Bites podcast, which has long been one of our most popular. In this interview, Massey asked us to rethink our assumptions about space -- and explained why.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tagsspace, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Michele Fitts Barnaby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 12:14 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond.

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 19, 2016 8:38 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity

Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Art meets science in a new geographical profiling study from Queen Mary University of London, which probably just revealed the identity of the art world's most and least iconic figure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: placespatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class

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Janek Wagner's curator insight, March 9, 2016 5:54 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 2016 9:38 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 9, 2016 10:06 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

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Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

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Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.


The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows some stark contrast between urban and rural land use patterns--it also shows urban networks that are designed to compression time and space.   

 

Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale, Time-Space Compression.

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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

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Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

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asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

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Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now

Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's make "10 not 12!" a new mantra for saving our cities and towns.


[12 foot lanes] are wrong because of a fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering—and many other disciplines—an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment.


Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale.

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Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood

Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Multifamily dwellings in high-density areas are changing the concept of neighborhood.


Tags: housingurban, place, neighborhoodspatialdensity.

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:13 PM

Unit 7 Urban

       The article describes a vertical neighborhood which is similar to an apartment, but instead has multiple family residences stacked on top of each other. This type of a community helps decrease land use and increases communication between people and creates a sense of community. The residents often interact, see each other, and form deep bonds that would be difficult to do in a street of single family homes.

        As land prices skyrocket and living in a city becomes more expensive the main solution used by architects is to build up. The sky is the limit and there is plenty of space in the sky providing an ideal space for people to live and expand into. However, with the increase of skyscrapers and multi storied buildings, air pollution increases due to the height of the building and any smoke or waste released from the building. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:16 AM

How cool is it that our world is changing every second? Some would say that it sucks and that we need to slow down. But why slow down, so much innovation is happening and we are at the front seat of it. People live differently now rather than sticking with old traditions and it is neat to see how they adjust to high-density areas.

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.


The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, economicracepoverty, spatialhousing.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 2015 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The research shows that kids who have tough childhoods — because of poverty, abuse, neglect, or witnessing domestic violence, for instance — are actually more likely to be sick when they grow up. They're more likely to get diseases like asthma, diabetes and heart disease. And they tend to have shorter lives than people who haven't experienced those difficult events as kids."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The hotspot maps of crime and poverty are correlated (not a big surprise), but this is another example of using spatial data to drive public policy.  After making these initially correlations, they noticed a total lack of services, including medical care in the area that needed it most.  This podcast is the story on how geographic analysis gave birth to a "clinic on wheels."


Tagsmedical, mapping, GISspatial, neighborhoodpodcast, urban, place, poverty.

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Linda Denty's curator insight, March 15, 2015 7:45 PM

This is surely the case globally, not just in USA.

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 1:23 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives 


This article is about Dr. Nancy Hardt and her work in the Gainesville area to decrease poverty, abuse and neglect. The research shows that kids who have tough childhoods due to poverty, abuse, neglect or witnessing domestic violence are more likely to be sick when they grow up and they tend to have shorter lives than people who haven't experienced difficult events as kids. By looking at Medicaid records, she made a map that showed exactly where Gainesville children were born into poverty. She worked with others to  determine that the area also had high crime rate including domestic violence and child abuse. Hardt visited this area and noted hunger, substandard housing and a lack of services, including medical care. She converted an old schoolbus into the "clinic on wheels" where patients could walk in without an appointment and get treatment free of charge. Hardt also opened the SWAG Center where kids can come play all day long. There's a food pantry, free meals, a computer room, AA meetings and a permanent health clinic is about to open up across the street. 

 

This relates to unit 1 because it deals with the analyzation of maps to determine the connection to a phenomena. Dr. Hardt took many maps of crime, poverty and hunger to show one area that was high in all areas. She then interpreted the maps to conclude that people in this area later obtained many illnesses and shorter lifespans. She worked with this information to create the solution of child safe places and medical centers to help reduce the outcome. This shows how important maps can be by looking at patters spatially.