Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Braves' New Ballpark Is An Urban Planner's Nightmare 

Braves' New Ballpark Is An Urban Planner's Nightmare  | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“The Braves chose to relocate to Cobb County from downtown Atlanta’s Turner Field after only 19 years because of a $400 million public subsidy from Cobb taxpayers. The costs are almost certain to balloon thanks to some significant fiscal buffoonery on the part of Cobb officials, including a lack of a comprehensive transportation plan and forgetting to ask the Braves to pay for traffic cops. Attached to SunTrust Park like a Cinnabon-scented goiter is the Battery Atlanta, a $550M mixed-used development that looks an awful lot like a New Urbanist project, the widely criticized school of planning that is equal parts social engineering and neoliberalism. SunTrust isn’t solely accessible by car—the Braves run a stadium shuttle bus that serves a couple of outer MARTA stations—but, compared to the team’s former home, the non-motorized options are paltry.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are many great geography angles to look at this particular issue.  The scale of governance matters in creating the political context for any given situation.  In this article, we see City vs. County vs. Metropolitan regional politics jockey for position, putting the interest of their own county above that of the larger metropolitan region.  We also see competing visions of ideal urban planning (a more sprawling, automobile-centered model vs. public transit, multi-use planning that is enclosed vs. open) all layered upon racial and socio-economic context of this particular place.   

 

Tagsarchitecture, scale, sport, urban, planning, urbanism, economic.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 14, 12:39 PM
This is a local issue - read this article!  What is your take on the relocation of the "Atlanta" Braves?
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The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition

The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazon’s zero-profit strategy is a disaster for anyone who goes up against it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have more questions than definitive answers, so let's get right to it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How have technological and logistical shifts in various industries made this once unthinkable union workable?  How will a retailer like Amazon change the food industry on the production side of the equation? What are the advantages and disadvantages of creative destruction (eliminating old jobs by creating new ones)?  Who stands to benefit the most, and who are the most negatively impacted?    

 

Tagsindustry, economic, scale, agriculture, food production, agribusiness, food

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 22, 2017 9:35 AM
Unit 5 - Commercial Agriculture, Agribusiness, Food Distribution; Unit 6 - Services, Distribution of Services, Service and Technology
mouthpaptops's comment, June 24, 2017 2:34 AM
good
charlytap's comment, June 30, 2017 1:29 AM
nice
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New Urbanism

"New Urbanism is a planning and development approach based on the principles of how cities and towns had been built for the last several centuries: walkable blocks and streets, housing and shopping in close proximity, and accessible public spaces. In other words: New Urbanism focuses on human-scaled urban design."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

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aliyah marie scarb's curator insight, May 25, 2017 10:34 PM
New urbanism is a type of urbanization. In new urbanism, everything is built so that it's in walking distance of other things mostly such as Winn Dixie and McDonald's in Callahan. 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:02 PM

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

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Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes

Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s no secret that the Great Lakes are suffering tremendous ecological strain — Lake Erie was even pronounced “dead” for a time during the 1960s because of an overload of phosphorus from municipal waste. Back in 1615, though, when the entire region was pristine and explorers Samuel de Champlain and Étienne Brûlé gazed out together from Lake Huron’s shores, they dubbed it la mer douce, 'the sweet sea.' Today roughly one-quarter of Canada’s population and a 10th of America’s population drink from the Great Lakes basin; the beleaguered lakes alone hold more than a fifth of Earth’s freshwater."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  How does this similar map shed more light on these issues?  

 

TagsCanada, environment, resources, waterspatial, scale

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 15, 2017 11:52 AM
These lakes are a tremendous resource, not only for the region but the nation as well. They need our attention and protection.-Lou 
 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 8, 9:58 PM
It is amazing, in a sad way, to see how in just four centuries these lakes have gone from "la mer douce" to "dead." This map is a reminder of the damage humans do to the environment on a daily basis, and of the importance of protecting our natural resources.  Considering the fact that these lakes hold roughly one fifth of all of the fresh water on the planet and provide drinking water for millions of people in both the U.S. and Canada, we need to think about the impact we have on the world around us and how that impact can come back to bite us on the rear end.
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Statehood, Politics, and Scale in D.C.

Statehood, Politics, and Scale in D.C. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Washington may be the political center of the free world, but its 670,000 residents don’t have a say in the national legislature. What they do have is a nonvoting delegate in the House of Representatives. Eleanor Holmes Norton can introduce legislation and vote in committee, but she can’t vote on the House floor. Over the course of 13 terms, the 'Warrior on the Hill' been fighting to change that."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered the podcast "Placemakers" you are missing out.  In this episode, they explore the competing political context of Washington D.C. Since this podcast ran, the citizens of the district voted overwhelmingly for statehood, but since the governance of the district operates more at the national scale then on the local level, statehood is not happening anytime soon.  

 

Tagsplace, podcast, political, autonomyscale, Washington DC.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, December 13, 2016 4:21 PM

If you haven't discovered the podcast "Placemakers" you are missing out.  In this episode, they explore the competing political context of Washington D.C. Since this podcast ran, the citizens of the district voted overwhelmingly for statehood, but since the governance of the district operates more at the national scale then on the local level, statehood is not happening anytime soon.  

 

Tagsplace, podcast, political, autonomyscale, Washington DC.

Leah Goyer's curator insight, December 14, 2016 1:26 PM
Freedom of speech
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Election Cartograms

Election Cartograms | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The states are colored red or blue to indicate whether a majority of their voters voted for the Republican candidate, Donald Trump, or the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton, respectively. There is significantly more red on a traditional election maps than there is blue, but that is in some ways misleading: the election was much closer than you might think from the balance of colors, and in fact Clinton won slightly more votes than Trump overall. The explanation for this apparent paradox, as pointed out by many people, is that the map fails to take account of the population distribution. It fails to allow for the fact that the population of the red states is on average significantly lower than that of the blue ones.

We can correct for this by making use of a cartogram, a map in which the sizes of states are rescaled according to their population. That is, states are drawn with size proportional not to their acreage but to the number of their inhabitants, states with more people appearing larger than states with fewer, regardless of their actual area on the ground. On such a map, for example, the state of Rhode Island, with its 1.1 million inhabitants, would appear about twice the size of Wyoming, which has half a million, even though Wyoming has 60 times the acreage of Rhode Island."

 

Tags: electoral, scale, politicaldensity, mapping.

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Olympic Races, in Your Neighborhood

Olympic Races, in Your Neighborhood | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What would Olympic races look like if they took place near you? Enter your address below to find out, or keep clicking the green button to explore races that begin in where you live."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I thought I was done with the Olympics, but this just sucked me right back in...in the most geographically relevant way possible.  Scale and distance are important geographic concepts and realizing JUST HOW FAST these Olympians are on the TV can be deceptive when they are paired up with other great Olympians.  Seeing how far in your own neighborhood you would have to go to beat the 400m champion--or the 5000m.  Since the United States doesn't use the metric system, this map is a good way to contextualize these measurements and try to run the race in your own backyard.  Let the Backyard Games begin!!

 

Tags: mappingfunscaledistance, sport, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.  

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ringacrux's comment, August 27, 2016 1:14 AM
Remarkable...!!
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How Orange Juice Is Made

The process of making orange juice on a humongous scale. The Americans drink so much of the stuff I'm surprised they still have any left for export.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you image that your orange juice comes from farmers on ladders picking, then hand-squeezing oranges into orange juice, then you need to see just how mechanized this agribusiness is.  The machinery alone means that a small-scale farmer simply can't compete on the open market.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is OJ concentrate cheaper in the store if they have to work hard to extract the water out of the juice?  How would OJ concentrate be an example of either a bulk-gaining product or a bulk-reducing product?  

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, economic, scale, agribusiness.

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Antonio Andrade's curator insight, May 4, 2016 5:47 PM
Excelente conocer todo el proceso!

Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 2016 7:07 PM
Great resource for FACS teachers.

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Soda Pop Stop

John Nese is the proprietor of Galcos Soda Pop Stop in LA. His father ran it as a grocery store, and when the time came for John to take charge, he decided to convert it into the ultimate soda-lovers destination. About 500 pops line the shelves, sourced lovingly by John from around the world. John has made it his mission to keep small soda-makers afloat and help them find their consumers. Galcos also acts as a distributor for restaurants and bars along the West Coast, spreading the gospel of soda made with cane sugar (no high-fructose corn syrup if John can avoid it).
Seth Dixon's insight:

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 14, 2016 11:04 PM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 2016 10:57 AM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 4, 2016 4:01 PM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

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Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.


The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows some stark contrast between urban and rural land use patterns--it also shows urban networks that are designed to compression time and space.   

 

Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale, Time-Space Compression.

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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

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Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now

Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's make "10 not 12!" a new mantra for saving our cities and towns.


[12 foot lanes] are wrong because of a fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering—and many other disciplines—an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment.


Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale.

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Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts


Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.

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Karen Breznikar's comment, October 13, 2015 2:36 AM
Simple but effective method of teaching scale to students. Great resource.
Madeleine Carr's comment, October 23, 2015 1:32 AM
I would love to let my students create one of these using the website or by drawing their own. It is a personal way of thinking and I believe that students will be able to retain/grasp the concept of scale through this simple method. It would also be really enjoyable and would allow for creative students to express themselves in geography. Students could then compare their scales with others in the class and you could ask students who have had different yards/towns/country in their lives to share and enhance the enjoyment and importance of multiculturalism.
Matt Bond's comment, November 27, 2015 6:10 PM
Students today are interacting with cartoons through all different mediums from The Simpsons, Family Guy or even those in the newspaper. Cartoons can provide short but affective content transfer in an interesting way. They can be highly emotional and effective in all mediums which is why they are so prone into today's society, which is why as teachers it is important to use cartoons in our classroom to change up the sources in which we use.
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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?
Seth Dixon's insight:

That is is the ENTIRE city of Florence, Italy on the left, while on the right is the area surrounding just one cloverleaf interchange in Atlanta, Georgia.  The high speed on the highways is one of the costs of sprawl.   


Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, scale

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 2016 10:38 PM
This post is interesting for us given the massive Mitchell Freeway and Wanneroo Rd  development just north of Banksia Grove. How do you think this perspective adds to the issues you could discuss in your project report? 
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The walkable city

The walkable city | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How do we solve the problem of the suburbs? Urbanist Jeff Speck shows how we can free ourselves from dependence on the car -- which he calls "a gas-belching, time-wasting, life-threatening prosthetic device" -- by making our cities more walkable and more pleasant for more people.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the 2017 APHG exam, there was a question that dealt with new urbanism and walkability.  This TED talk from Jeff Speck gives a good sense of what planners believe in new urbanism are trying to do (you can also watch his earlier TED talk, 4 ways to make a city more walkable). Here also is information on New Urbanism (dot org) from it's practicioners, such as the Congress on New Urbanism.  Lastly, here is an academic article reviewing the critiques of new urbanism with rebuttals.    

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planningtransportation, urbanism, scale, TED, video.

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M Sullivan's curator insight, August 28, 2017 9:47 AM
A really interesting talk about the benefits of walkable cities. Examples are American but excellent ideas regarding environmental, health and peripheral benefits that could be applied here in Australia.
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:56 PM

In the 2017 APHG exam, there was a question that dealt with new urbanism and walkability.  This TED talk from Jeff Speck gives a good sense of what planners believe in new urbanism are trying to do (you can also watch his earlier TED talk, 4 ways to make a city more walkable). Here also is information on New Urbanism (dot org) from it's practicioners, such as the Congress on New Urbanism.  Lastly, here is an academic article reviewing the critiques of new urbanism with rebuttals.    

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planningtransportation, urbanism, scale, TED, video.

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:22 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: In the 2017 APHG exam, there was a question that dealt with new urbanism and walkability. This TED talk from Jeff Speck gives a good sense of what planners believe in new urbanism are trying to do (you can also watch his earlier TED talk, 4 ways to make a city more walkable). Here also is information on New Urbanism (dot org) from it's practicioners, such as the Congress on New Urbanism. Lastly, here is an academic article reviewing the critiques of new urbanism with rebuttals.
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4 ways to make a city more walkable

4 ways to make a city more walkable | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Freedom from cars, freedom from sprawl, freedom to walk your city! City planner Jeff Speck shares his "general theory of walkability" -- four planning principles to transform sprawling cities of six-lane highways and 600-foot blocks into safe, walkable oases full of bike lanes and tree-lined streets.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  This TED talk from Jeff Speck gives a good sense of what planners believe in new urbanism are trying to do (you can also watch his earlier TED talk, The Walkable City).  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) from it's practioners, including the Congress on New Urbanism.  Lastly, here is an academic article reviewing the critiques of new urbanism with rebuttals.  

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planningtransportation, urbanism, scaleTED, video.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:09 AM
Unit 7 - New Urbanism
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 8:01 PM
Enhancing urban liveability - creating better cities for the future
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 8:01 PM
Enhancing liveability
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Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon

Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Rick Friday has been giving farmers a voice and a laugh every Friday for two decades through his cartoons in Farm News.
Now the long-time Iowa farm cartoonist tells KCCI that he has been fired. Friday announced Sunday that his job was over after 21 years in a Facebook post that has since gone viral."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some intriguing layers connected to the politics of agribusiness in this story.  First off, the political cartoon highlights a pithy truth--that while the 'traditional' farmer is a lucrative position, in the global economy, there are corporations that are amassing fortunes in agribusiness.  The second connection is more telling--the newspaper company felt compelled to fire the cartoonist as for voicing this perspective as the newspaper advertisers flexed their pocketbooks to change the direction of the news being reported.  

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, foodeconomicindustry, scale, media

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How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker

How Jane Jacobs beat Robert Moses to be the ultimate placemaker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Jane Jacobs lacked formal training in city planning but became an urban visionary who promoted dense, mixed-use neighborhoods where people interacted on the streets. She also became the nemesis of New York master builder Robert Moses. On our inaugural episode, we’ll explore Jacobs’ legacy and how the ideas and ideals of 'St. Jane' hold up today."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How do you create a sense of place?  How can you make a neighborhood more vibrant and meaningful to the residents?  These are questions that central to city planners, community organizers, activists, home owners, renters, business owners, and a wide range of local stakeholders.  The Placemakers podcast has many episodes on these topics worth listening to, starting with the one about Jane Jacobs, a leading urbanist who was a proponent of “The Cheerful Hurly-Burly” of the “zoomed in” city life who fought against Robert Moses’ more sterile “zoomed out” spaces of transportation flows.  In another podcast titled “the quest for the perfect place,” the series explores new urbanism and the ideas that have shaped the movement.

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, podcastscale.

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The history of space exploration mapped

The history of space exploration mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Humans have dreamed about spaceflights forever but only in the second half of the 20th century were developed rockets that were powerful enough to overcome the force of gravity to reach orbital velocities that could open space to human exploration. The awesome poster called Chart of Cosmic Exploration documents every major space mission starting from the Luna 2 in 1959 to the DSCOVR in 2015. The map traces the trajectories of every orbiter, lander, rover, flyby, and impactor which ever left the Earth’s orbit and successfully completed its mission."

 

Tags: space, remote sensing, scale

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Maps to change how you think about American voters — especially small-town, heartland white voters

Maps to change how you think about American voters — especially small-town, heartland white voters | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Small towns are as Democratic as big cities. Suburban and rural voters are the Republicans.

 

I have assembled a Web map from precinct-level 2008 election data that allows users to zoom in and out, focus in on specific towns or neighborhoods and superimpose census data on income and race, allowing readers to examine their own favorite postindustrial towns. One of the most striking lessons from exploring these maps is that the red non-metropolitan counties on election-night maps are internally heterogeneous, but always following the same spatial pattern: Democrats are clustered in town centers, along Main Street, and near the courthouses schools, and municipal buildings where workers are often unionized. They live along the old railroad tracks from the 19th century and in the apartment buildings and small houses in proximity to the mills and factories where workers were unionized in an earlier era.

Seth Dixon's insight:

There have been SOOOO many articles about the 2016 election, what happened, why it happened and how particular demographics voted and why.  Most of these articles are highly partisan, or ideologically informed but this just analysis of past spatial voting patterns  (I am waiting for the updated version of these maps to show what happened in 2016--but I'm thinking some of this changed).  Too often we’ve lumped the geography of small towns and rural areas as though they are one and the same.  Too often will only see electoral maps with state-level voting data or possibly county level data; but the sub-county scale reveals what would otherwise be missing in our assessment of electoral, spatial patterns (Scale matters?  Who knew?)

 

Tags: electoral, scale, political, mapping.

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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We all know that agriculture is becoming increasingly mechanized.  In addition to large, expensive machinery, this video showcases some robots that are automating work that was previously very labor intensive. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will robotics impact agriculture and other industries in the future?  Will this impact the spatial dynamics of agricultural land? 

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, scale, agribusiness, technology.       

 

 

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 2016 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 2016 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
Nicole's curator insight, January 4, 2017 5:10 PM

Is this the future of #Agriculture? #agrobots #ffce2017

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Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See

Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“Geography is linked to the environment,” says Connie Wyatt Anderson, of Canadian Geographic Education. “In the Lake Winnipeg watershed, what you throw into the Bow River in Calgary eventually ends up in Hudson Bay.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


TagsCanada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:29 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

Niall Conway's curator insight, March 16, 2016 1:38 PM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:36 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

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Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History

Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In this lesson, we provide strategies to help students accurately interpret maps, and we suggest ways for using current event maps as a tool to better understand both history and what’s going on in the world today.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 22, 2016 10:57 AM

The NY Times learning blog really has some interesting, insightful lessons.  This one looks at using maps to understand culture and history, and how it affects today.  

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 12:44 AM

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

Nora Morton's curator insight, October 10, 2016 1:54 PM
A fantastic source on how to use maps in the classrooms and questions to help guide students into further exploration.  Provides numerous links to help understand the background and various types of maps, samples linking history with current events, and tools to create your own maps. 
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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  


That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."


Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planningspatial, scale, historical.

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Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

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Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake

Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's difficult to comprehend the ridiculous amounts of water that have fallen in such a short time in a state that, until recently, had been in the grip of a historic drought. But one place to start would be to look at reservoir levels in the state. In the past 30 days, Texas reservoirs have gone from being 73 percent full to 82 percent full, according to data maintained by the Texas Water Development board. All told, about 8 million acre-feet of water have flowed into the state's reservoirs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just how much of water is 8 million acre-feet?  It's almost impossible for most people to visualize that, but this series of graphics is designed to put the scale of the recent flooding in Texas into perspective (and yes, I love that Rhode Island is almost a unit of measurement).

  

Tags: water, fluvial, perspective, scale, Rhode Island.

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The steep costs of living so far apart from each other

The steep costs of living so far apart from each other | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In strictly economic terms, sprawl is inefficient. Spread people out, and it takes them longer to drive where they need to go, and it costs them more in gas money to get there. Disperse a few people over a lot of land, and that land is used inefficiently, too. Then give those people roads and sewers — you’d need a lot more of both to serve 20 households living over a square mile than 20 on the same block. And that's to say nothing of the costs of fire and police service when people live far apart.

These costs add up, in both private budgets and public ones. It’s a messy thought exercise to contemplate tallying them, akin to trying to calculate the productivity America wastes by sitting in traffic every year. How do you measure, for instance, the saved health care costs in a community where many people walk for transportation every day? How do you quantify the pleasure gained from a big yard that offsets any of these costs?


Tags: planning, sprawl, scale.

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Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:34 PM

APHG- HW Option 6

 

Cass Allan's curator insight, April 16, 2015 9:46 AM

good for urbanisation or liveability

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 27, 2015 12:01 AM

Affordability impacts on people's choices about where to live and in turn impacts on access to goods and services, community identity and social connectedness in many outlying suburbs