Geography Education
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This computer programmer solved gerrymandering in his spare time

This computer programmer solved gerrymandering in his spare time | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We could take human error out of the redistricting process entirely. Why don't we?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This computer programmer (code word in the newspapers for geographers using GIS) has created a way to take the human element out of the redistricting process.  Dividing places into separate, formal regions is an important task, one that often times requires an intimate knowledge of the place, it's cultural, economic and physical characteristics.  That's how I would want things to been done in a perfect world, but partisan chicanery has led to so many gerrymandered districts that the human touch is what many of us fear more than a cold, impersonal division that does not take place, history, and community into account.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you trust the politicians that are in charge of your state to create better districts than computer-generated districts that are optimized for compactness?  What are some of the potential limitations of compact districts?  Would an independent committee/bipartisan group do a better job? How does the Voting Rights Act complicate the redistricting process?    

 

Tags: gerrymandering, politicalmapping, cartography, GIS, unit 4 political.

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Madison Murphy's curator insight, May 16, 2:34 PM
The Computer Programmer looks at gerrymandering in a different way by drawing boundary lines on his map and then comparing to show you the difference. This relates to the classroom by showing how gerrymandering draws lines of states but is illegal. This still exists and is bigger in political parties.
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:23 AM
Unit 1 - regions, GIS, Unit 4 - districts, gerrymandering (please note, saying "solved" might be a stretch as any districting will have to work on some form of bias) 
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Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map

Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell what’s wrong with this map of the United States? I’ll give you a hint: Look near the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. Spot the problem yet? A further hint: Look at the border of Wisconsin and Illinois as well as the Florida Panhandle. See it now? The Wisconsin-Illinois border is slightly more southern and the Florida Panhandle is slightly shorter.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This mapping application is my favorite discovery after the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.  The election was obviously very contentious and incredibly close, both in regard to the popular vote as well as the Electoral College.  Using this mapping application, you can re-divide the states of the union by shifting the counties around.  Using the voting patterns based on the county-level data, you can see how your proposed divisions would have impacted the 2016 presidential election. 

There have been many plans on how to divide the 50 states into various regional configurations (50 states of equal population, regions of economic interactions, cultural regions, and the Nine Nations of America), and this is another iteration of that age-old theme. While this isn’t an activity in gerrymandering in the strictest sense (this is not reapportioning within the state based on population change but between states), it shows just how gerrymandering works.  It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency, but you could make it a landslide (in either direction) if you manipulate the current state borders.  The highest electoral vote I could engineer for Donald Trump was 407, and the highest electoral total I could manufacture for Hillary Clinton was 402.  The point of this is to show that the balance within and among states can be far more delicate than we might presume.  Just a line here or a line there can dramatically alter the balance of power.        

Activity #1: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Republican Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Republicans? Add a screenshot.

Activity #2: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Democratic Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Democrats? Add a screenshot.

Activity #3: Try to tip the election to the Democrats with the most subtle, minor changes that might go under the radar. Explain your changes to the state map.  Add a screenshot.   

 

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political, regionsNorth America.

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Spoof Candidate, Jerry Mandering

"Ok…we’ll admit it. Jerry Mandering isn’t a real political candidate.  We created this video to highlight the absurdity of the process behind having elected officials draw their own lines to their advantage – a manipulative practice known as 'gerrymandering.' Public officials like Del. Jerry Mandering wish you wouldn’t worry about the fact that he can pick and choose his own voters, but you can let your legislators know that you support a non-partisan effort for fairer, more competitive elections."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This spoof video was highlighted in a Washington Post article, and like most parodies, it wouldn't be funny if there weren't so much truth in it. 

 

Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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Harley Bass's curator insight, April 30, 3:49 PM
This is connected to our chapter political geography through gerrymandering. Gerrymandering meandering is redrawing election lines in your favor. This video mainly talks about Gerrymandering in a commedic way. The candidate jerry meandering Is running  for election and doing it in a crooked way.
Brandon Osteen's curator insight, May 1, 6:50 PM
I personally think that gerrymandering is a very bad thing and it should not be used. It is illegal which is a good thing, however some political candidates still do it. Gerrymandering is when candidates redraw district lines in their favor. This relates to our class because we have been learning about this and this was one of our vocab words.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, May 17, 2:18 PM
This video related to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are learning about political geography  in class. In this video it explains all the things candidates say they do not do but really do. For example they say that they will listen to our ideas when really the wont even look at the paper. My opinion on this video is that it relates to what we are learning a lot. 
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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualizationregions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.

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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?
Seth Dixon's insight:

One county commission discribed these political movements thus: "It's grounded in the legitimate feeling that if you're marginalized by geography, it's easy to feel neglected by the central government."  The political division between urban and rural citizens can lead to pockets of the population feeling as though the state government ignores your and the surrounding communities.  It took the Civil War to separate West Virginia from Virginia, and while many may want to be in a different state, it's not happening simply because there is grassroots support for greater local autonomy.  Hypothetically, let's say that many new states are generated; what consequences might come of this?  Would it leading to further gerrymandering?      


Tags: political, conflict, devolution, autonomy, bordersgerrymandering.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is part of a fabulous TED-ED lesson about redistricting.  The redistricting process is far from neutral; we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide the districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.

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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem

A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On three different occasions, the candidate with the most votes didn't become President of the United States. We call this "The Electoral College Problem." Here a solution. Simple. Mathematical. Rational.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As a disclaimer, I'm not endorsing the removal of all current state borders, but I think that this is a great thought exercise that involves some serious spatial thinking and geography knowledge to create this map (or even to critique and discuss it).  This map represents an attempt to restructure the states so that each state would have equal value in the electoral college with roughly equal populations (county borders remained firm).  What about the physical and human geography would make some of these "states" better (or worse) than the current configuration of the 50 states? How would this 'redistricting' impact your local region? 


Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:43 PM
I know the founding fathers would be horrified as this cuts into the whole idea of the electoral college: to place a further check on the majority when electing a president. Nonetheless, I would support a redrawing of the map that would lean toward a popular vote system.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:27 PM
Interesting idea, however I can't say this is a "rational" solution to the Electoral College. It is actually completely irrational to think that the borders could be redrawn and everyone could be redistricted every four years... They can't even manage to get a census out every year... Logistical nightmare. I agree with Ken and Gary, let the people choose with the popular vote
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 5, 2015 5:02 PM

Far out

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Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | Geography Education | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.

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Landon Conner's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:34 AM

Democrats have won the popular vote roughly. But the Republicans are set to have the secone biggest house majority in 60 years according to the article. Republicans were favored in more house districts compared to democrats. Most of this is because democrats are in urban areas. LDC

Brealyn Holley's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:53 AM

Since the redistricting has to do with the Republicans, which they have taken over more seats, but the Democrats have won the poll by a numerous number. You could see this from either side. A republican sees this as a good thing and the democrats would see this as a bad thing for them. ~BH

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 23, 2016 5:32 PM

Gerrymandering can cause problems in the political word.Not only can it make unfair elections but it can cause voters to become frustrated at how even though one region has more votes,the region is then seperated where its splitting the majority in half so they dont have the majority vote anymore. -C.A

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Gerrymandering: What is it?

Gerrymandering: What is it? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This page is a quick primer for understanding how the decennial census leads to the incredibly political process of reapportionment of the congressional districts.  It also defines the specific gerrymandering techniques of packing, cracking, hijacking and kidnapping as well as the historical origin of the term.

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The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     

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Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

Alex Rodgers's curator insight, April 22, 1:16 AM
This a great tool to connect to political geography. Interactive learning in my opinion is one of the best ways to learn. This allows for us to better understanding political cartography in a way that is both fun and helpful.
Austin Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 5:33 PM
This game is all about gerrymandering in Political Geography and the objective is to set boundaries for each district so that each has a similar population. This game really shows how difficult gerrymandering is and the process of getting the boundaries accepted.  
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The Carolinas Work to Clarify Their Borders

The Carolinas Work to Clarify Their Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As a team works to restore the North Carolina-South Carolina border to the original 1772 lines, some worry about the consequences.

 

Old maps and borders where often determined by local landmarks like trees, rivers, roads, fences, etc.  Trees get uprooted and over time, rivers will wend their way down slightly different paths and the informal old borders get called into question.  The border between North and South Carolina, traversing through swampy forested area was imperfect and now that they are trying to rectify it, some South Carolina residents face the prospect of needing to be North Carolina residents...not a small thing when you consider the utilities, government documents, taxes and voting. 

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Bill aims to ‘take politics’ out of drawing district lines

Bill aims to ‘take politics’ out of drawing district lines | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A Democratic state senator in South Carolina wants to end the practice of lawmakers choosing who votes for them. The senator introduced a bill Wednesday that would create an independent commission to draw the state’s political districts. Lawmakers in the GOP-controlled Legislature now control that process. South Carolina voters would approve or reject the boundaries of new political districts in a statewide referendum if the bill becomes law. The state redraws its political boundaries for South Carolina House, state Senate and U.S. House seats after each 10-year U.S. Census [the next Census is in 2020]."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While it may be laudable to try eliminate partisan gerrymandering, this bill is going nowhere.  Still, it is an important issue to discuss. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What is the difference between the terms redistricting and gerrymandering?  Why won't this bill pass? 

What is the fairest way to divide districts?

 

Tags: gerrymandering, political, census, unit 4 political.

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Judges Find Wisconsin Redistricting Unfairly Favored Republicans

Judges Find Wisconsin Redistricting Unfairly Favored Republicans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A federal panel called the 2011 redrawing of Wisconsin Assembly districts an unconstitutional gerrymander, ruling in a case that could go to the Supreme Court.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectrum, depending on who is charge during the redistricting process.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

 

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

 

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Gerrymandering Visualized

Gerrymandering Visualized | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectrum.  Which map do you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

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Lucas Olive's curator insight, April 28, 8:19 PM
This article relates to what we have been learning in class because it talks about how gerrymandering works and how it manipulates political geography. My opinion on this topic is that it's a big problem for people who oppose the side that is gerrymandering and it's really unfair to the opposing side.
Kassie Geiger's curator insight, April 30, 9:35 PM
This is related to world cultural geography by the word gerrymandering. Gerrymandering is the process of redrawing legislative boundaries for the purpose of benefiting the party in power. Gerrymandering is completely and utterly unfair to the powerless party. The process is practically setting up zones of people who are, for instance, democratic, that means that particular county (region, district, etc.) is democratic majority and possibly have republican minority, therefore the democrats win that county (region, district, etc).
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:19 AM
Unit 4 - Gerrymandering 
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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Redistricting today has become a common tool in American politics.  Every ten years with the new census, political parties seize the opportunity to maximize their political influence by trying to minimize the 'demographic and spatial limitations' of their particular voting bloc.      


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

Michael E Herrera's curator insight, July 26, 6:29 PM
Is Gerry Mander Jim Crow's cousin?
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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive mapping activity is an excellent tool to introduce the idea of redistricting in general and gerrymandering to be more specific.  The creation of a new congressional district, or the loss of an old one, affects every district around it, necessitating new maps. Even states not adding or losing congressional representatives need new district maps that reflect the population shifts within their borders, so that residents are equally repre­sented no matter where they live. This ritual carving and paring of the United States into 435 sovereign units, known as redistricting, was intended by the Framers solely to keep democracy’s electoral scales balanced. Instead, redistricting today has become a part of the political game—a way for elected leaders to entrench themselves in 435 impregnable garrisons from which they can maintain political power while avoiding demographic realities.  And how is gerrymandering a part of the current government shutdown?  Read Thomas Friedman's opinion on the subject or an opinion from the Economist.


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

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Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a painful page in world history, but it needs retelling.  The Soviet era profoundly reshaped the cultural, political and economic geographies of the region.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Central Asiahistoricalwarethnicitypolitical, gerrymandering.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:37 PM

This graph represents the areas where many of the Chechnes had been displaced to in the era of Stalins regime. Many of these people were displaced from their homes and forced to move. Many of them either had to leave family behind of they were forced to move together and had no initial home to live in.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:51 PM

i see this as history retelling itself. for some reason throughout history terrible men think that their race is better than another, this is not true and if a person wants to think this that is their prerogative, but some men think it to such an extent that they seek to eliminate the entire other people. nothing good can come of this and it turns into mass conflict every time. it destroys countries and breeds hate on all sides.

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Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin

Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Shaped like a giant pistol sitting on its butt end, Wisconsin's new 22nd state Senate District is Exhibit A in the case against partisan redistricting.


Seth Dixon's insight:

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

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The League of Dangerous Mapmakers

The League of Dangerous Mapmakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Redistricting today has become the most insidious practice in American politics—a way, as the opportunistic machinations following the 2010 census make evident, for our elected leaders to entrench themselves in 435 impregnable garrisons from which they can maintain political power while avoiding demographic realities.


Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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David Holoka's curator insight, February 10, 2016 9:48 AM

Mapmakers seem to have a larger effect on elections, more so than the voters or candidates do. This is utterly unfair, because voters need to have the largest part. 

Lilah Rozar's curator insight, February 10, 2016 9:50 AM

Gerrymandering is a very manipulative and unfair way of setting up the votes. It is a way for them to take control over how the voting will be set up in their favor and it is cheating out the public. Although, it is a way for the elected officials to get re-elected.

Peyton Conner's curator insight, February 10, 2016 9:58 AM

 Redistricting is one of the most deceptive  political task that is given to select few committee and legislature officers. Redistricting is definitely "dangerous" and "unpredictable" ,and as this article says not for everyone.  Redrawing a district sure is something to be proud of. PC

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Gerrymandering 101

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).

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Delainee Alysse Bushey's curator insight, April 27, 5:00 PM
This video relates to what we are talking about in class, political geography, because it talks about gerrymandering. Gerrymandering deals with political geography because the people who make the district lines are politicians and district lines deals with geography. My opinion on this is that people use redistricting for their own good, so it can benefit them in the long run.
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Justice Dept. approves Florida's district maps

Justice Dept. approves Florida's district maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday approved the Legislature's plans for new congressional, House and Senate districts, paving the way for the state to begin using the maps in preparation for the November elections.

 

What is gerrymandering?  Why, when and where might it happen?  What strikes you as distinct about district 5?  

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NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts

NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The once-a-decade process of drawing Congressional districts has prompted lawsuits in more than half the states over issues like partisan gerrymandering and accusations of discrimination.
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Anneli's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:12 PM

EXTRA CREDIT 

Gerrymandering- manipulating the boundaries of an electoral constituency to favor one party or class. 

 

This article talks about many lawsuits related to redistricting, have been put against  in more than half the states, asking judges to decide whether or not new maps take "partisan gerrymandering too far or discriminate against minority voters."