Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The great mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:41 PM

Intresting

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:50 PM

it is horrifying that a government could force people to live in abject poverty and that the only source of income in this area is a tourist trap that needs to be rebuilt every few years in its entirety.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:22 PM

This major tourist attraction site is very interesting, a mosque made of just mud. Everything is mud besides the mosque, business and individual homes. So unfortunately for the citizens, this is not a great place to live. Since this place is historic, outside sources such as the UN do not really want to help the people out because they want the city of Djenne to be preserved as a historic site and they want everything to be as if it was ages ago, they will not even allow interior redesign. It seems though as if the only money they will ever receive is pretty much tourist money,  They do want to modernize, but in a way that keeps the history visible. they have failed to modernize in other sectors, such as garbage disposal. their garage is destroying their water which is running through their streets and making the water quality bad, which in turn, makes the mud quality bad for building.

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Burning Man and Ephemeral Geographies

"An aerial perspective on Burning Man 2013, in Black Rock Playa, NV"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This annual arts festival with a strong counter-cultural ethos literally is an experiment in producing alternative urban and cultural geographies that reject normative regulations embedded within societies. These geographies created last only about a week, as an escape from the regular strictures of society. Burning Man celebrates alternative spiritualities and creates monuments to impermanence while allowing people to wear zany costumes. Many feel that in leaving behind ‘the real world’ they find their true home at Burning Man. The ephemeral alternative geographies then fade back into the desert but not without creating a visually remarkable place. Some feel that the festival has become too popular and famous to be what it truly was intended to be as the rich and famous descend on the playa as well.


Questions to Ponder: Part of Burning Man’s success is due to its impermanence; if this community were created to exist year-round, would it still work? Why or why not? Why do festivals like this attract so many? What does it culturally say about the participants and the societies that they leave behind?


Tags: communityplace, architectureimages, art, landscape.

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Barbara Goebel's curator insight, September 13, 2014 11:58 AM

Fascinating topic for research...connect it to ecology themes, economics, psychology...what else?

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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LANDFILL HARMONIC: Inspiring dreams one note at a time!

A heartfelt & moving story of how instruments made from recycled trash bring hope to children whose future is otherwise spiritless.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've shared this video before, but this worthy project is now asking for assistance on kickstarter and I feel it merits reposting.  This video shows that the human spirit of beauty and joy can come shining through from the poorest of places.  Slums are not new, but rapid population growth coupled with rural-to-urban migration patterns have led to an increasing amount of slums.  Despite all the stereotypical images of destitute poverty, slums can also be places with a strong vibrant communities with residents filled with innovation, hope and ambition.  For more on this organization, see their Facebook page.   


Tags: urban, squatter, poverty, South America, community, Paraguay.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 12:11 PM

This is really cool.  You would think that people living on a pile of trash would be really miserable and have a negative outlook on life, which in a way these kids probably do.  However they have found a way to bring joy to their lives and bring them closer together.  Going through the trash they are sometimes lucky enough to find actual instruments that have been thrown away, but more times than others only find pieces they can use.  Taking the pieces of trash that they find and turning them into instruments to make music is the highlight of most of these kids day.  They go to show that they can live in the worst of the worst but that doesn't mean that that will stop them from becoming something in life.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:59 AM

It is fascinating to see how a community living in very poor conditions have found a way to make their society and culture flourish. Where most residents make a living sorting through garbage, they have found a way to use that same trash to create instruments and an orchestra, adding rich culture to their community and giving the youth opportunities they would not have otherwise. It shows that while a community may live in less than ideal conditions, it is still possible to have a thriving culture.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:58 PM

this story is a wonderful example of how even in a horribly impoverished area people can still make art, and overcome massive hardships to chase something they truly want.

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Lawns Into Gardens

Lawns Into Gardens | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are joys and rewards in growing some of your own crops; there's even beauty.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Although a front lawn is not ecologically the best use of urban space, there are strong cultural pressure to conform to that aesthetic ideal.  When individuals choose to grow vegetables and fruit, they often face some push-back from the city or homeowners associations with a different vision on the appropriate use of space.  Some have estimated though, that if we were to convert 10 percent the country's grass lawns to vegetable gardens that they could supply roughly a third of our fresh vegetables. 


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture.

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Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 10:14 AM

I think that having having an urban garden whether it be in the front yard or the backyard should be a must in every state even if it is a little garden, I think it will make great use of the land.

Drake's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:11 AM

Yes, I agree, it is an act of bringing nature close to you. 

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Landfill Harmonic

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows that the human spirit of beauty and joy can come shining through from the poorest of places.  Slums are not new, but rapid population growth coupled with rural-to-urban migration patterns have led to an increasing amount of slums.  Despite all the stereotypical images of destitute poverty, slums can also be places with a strong vibrant communities with residents filled with innovation, hope and ambition.  For more on this organization, see their Facebook page.   


Tags: urban, squatter, poverty, South America, community, Paraguay.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:19 PM
After seeing this video, I have come to realize that here in America, we take so much for granted and complain about the smallest of things that do not go the way wanted, most Americans always want the newest and best of things whether it be cars, houses or electronics. Here in this video, you can just see the happiness these kids have and the joy that is brought to their lives using junk, literally junk. Their instruments are made from broken instruments or pieces of garbage picked from the landfill that could make the instruments. The fact that they are poor, live in slums and can have such joy in their lives, should be an eye opener for us here in America so that we stop taking our lives for granted and realize if people can be poor and find joy out of junk, then we can stop being selfish and take pride and joy in what we have even if it is not the newest and greatest thing on the market.
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The Importance of Place

The Importance of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Using the vocabulary of this course, please describe in detail the geographic context of a town like this (real or imaginary).  What is the town like?  How did it get that way?  What type of meaning does 'place' have for those that live there?  

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GIS for home buyers

GIS for home buyers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Whoa, check out Trulia Local - A visual way to explore crime, schools, home prices, and local data.

 

The map above was generated to display the areas within a 30 minute commute of Rhode Island College in Providence.  This site generates commuting maps and other layers that are especially pertinent for home buyers---schools, crime stats, property values and local amenities.  This is GIS data brought to the real estate shopping community, but consider this a project in the making.  One of the best exercises to get to know a place holistically is to shop for housing and make some locational analysis decisions.

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Colorful Places & Spaces

Colorful Places & Spaces | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is only right to start this site off with photos of the Holsteiner Stairs by artist Horst Glaesker. In 2008, I saw photos of this installation in Wuppertal, Germany and I knew I had to create a colour blog.

 

How can public art help create a sense of place?  How does this transform the neighborhood and community?  What are the cultural and econommic impacts of public art?       

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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement ...

 

Community, agriculture, gender, politics and the environment... it's all here in this inspiring clip.  

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:31 AM

Maathai is an incredible woman. Her efforts are improving the environment and agriculture in Africa. Another interesting note on her story is that she partnered with a Norwegian group to start the greenbelt movement, showing how globalization can also apply to shared efforts to do good.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 1:56 PM

This is an incredible peace of Wangari Maathai, who is from the same country i am from Kenya, and she had a powerful movement from a simple act of planting trees in hope of helping her environment, and women was looked at as a fool and looked down upon, she is an icon and vision able leader amongst most Kenyan women today. She created a path for most of the young girls and had her clear message was to protect your environment, create paths and a future for yourself, she is an icon and her movement will continue to impact not only my life but others globally.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 2015 8:22 PM

Land is a pretty valuable thing. As are civil rights. When a women, a gender traditionally looked upon as inferior in Kenya, takes a bunch of other women and starts a movement to plant trees so they could better the lives of all in the country, she tends to be looked down upon by the government. Maathai even attracted the attention of the Kenyan President who dismissed her as just some women. Her tree planting initiative eventually lead to nationwide movements that lead to demise of that very president that dismissed her movement as a waste of time and effort.

 

When we watched this clip in class, I was amazed by not only her bravery to stand up to such a ruler but by her devotion to something so simple as wanting to plant trees so the people of Kenya had food to eat and fuel to cook with.

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Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Nepal, government owned forests are being felled at record speed, while community managed ones are thriving.

 

This is a great link for discussing governance and the environmental interactions and community.   

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:00 PM

The deforestation of Nepal to supply the growing needs of India is an example of how growth in one country strips another of its resources. While Nepal may gain in the short term form logging away their forests, deforestation has steep long term costs. Many people live off the forests and their disappearance could threaten to ruin their culture.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 23, 2014 1:05 PM

Rapid population growth and development in a country can lead to dangerous resource drains, both illegal and legal, in neighboring countries. India's growth demands more wood, and Nepal has been trying to supply their demand. In the last 20 years, 25% of Nepal's forests have been harvested for the logging industry. The demand for wood and rising prices has caused an illegal logging industry that threatens non-governmental forests. Luckily, in the 1980s, Nepal handed over 25% of the forests to communities, who have worked to preserve them.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:09 AM

This is really a sad thing to behold, these jungles which for many many years have provided resources to both wild life and resources for the people of Nepal. Unfortunately now partially because of globalization these jungles are far more valuable for their lumber than as living forests. The destruction of the environment such as this is a huge catastrophe for the world as a whole. Ideally the government or foreign powers will do something to prevent the entirety of the forests from being cut down.

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Baltimore's painted screens

"Jan Crawford explores a unique folk art tradition going back 100 years - once seen on nearly every row house in the working class neighborhoods of Baltimore, as artists today once again embrace the tradition of painted window screens, an authentic connection to the city's past."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is tremendous example of an urban cultural landscape that is distinctive to a certain place (Baltimore) and a particular time period.  The practice of painting landscape scene on window screens began over 100 years ago, as a way to beat the heat, but still afford some form of privacy.  This aesthetic emerged out of particular set of cultural, technological, and economic factors. What was once common is now perceived as a folk art that is a worth preserving because it is a marker of the local heritage.  This is an excellent example to demonstrate a sense of place that can develop within a community.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom (68 and counting).   

Tags: place, landscapeart, folk cultures, videoculture, community.

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Kevin Barker's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:22 AM

An excellent example of a localized cultural landscape characteristic that is a result of cultural diffusion that formed for economic as well as environmental factors.

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France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting concept that shows the divergence between national and regional identities.  68% of French citizens recognize that consolidating regional administration will be economically more efficient at the national level; however 77% don't want to see the elimination of their own local region.   The formation of place-based identities operate an multiple scales.  How would you feel if your state was absorbed by a neighboring state?  How come? 


Tags: communityplacegovernance, France.

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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.  

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The Detroit Bus Company

"Young entrepreneur Andy Didorosi believes that the way to Detroit’s new era depends on better leadership and a solid connection between the city and the suburbs. The city in 2012 axed its plans to build the M-1 light rail, the transit solution that would’ve bridged that vital connection, Didorosi bought a bus, had a local artist trick it out with a wicked mural, and he started the Detroit Bus Company.  Dedicated to a more connected city, Andy Didorosi is bringing Detroit home one ride at a time."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the US with a population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledThe tax base continued to shrink, city services were spread thin and the poor services encouraged people to migrate elsewhere, leaving current homeowners unable to sell their homes at a fair price.  Today, Detroit is $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive.  Detroit filed for bankruptcy July 18, 2013 and became the largest U.S. city ever to file for bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail (photo gallery of 'ruin photography'). 


With all this sad news, there are still glimmers of sucess as seen in this video.  Some entrepreneurs and local have stepped in as the city government has been unable to manage the needs of a large city creating organizations such as the Detroit Bus Company


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, poverty, communityeconomic, industry, Detroit

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Jackie Hinton's comment, July 19, 2013 12:18 PM
love the video,didn't know detroit was in that bad of shape.
Betty Denise's comment, July 20, 2013 5:45 AM
http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html (Detroit détruite)
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:52 PM

Andy is creating a transportation system for the new Detroit.  Once the inevitable downsize takes place his idea for transportation could take off.

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Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle

Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Rhode Island is one of five states in which the number of people getting  help from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP-formerly known as 'food stamps') has more than doubled since 2008. In 2012, 16 percent of its residents received aid from the program. Read the related article.  The article details how Woonsocket's economy is impacted by these monthly fluctuations is disposable income.  Why is Rhode Island one of that states with a doubling participation in this program?  What other spatial patterns to you see? 


Tags: Rhode Islandeconomic, mapping, poverty, community.

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Dias Vidia's curator insight, April 2, 2013 2:05 AM

http://redgage.com/photos/macb/postage-us-liberty-of-all-15-c.html

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:53 PM

The story of food stamps displays how the government aide helps more than the individuals in the short term. I always knew that the people on food stamps benefited because they are now obviously able to eat better than they would if left on their own. However, I never really realized just how much of the government money also went back into the businesses. Without that money I am sure some of the stores would have closed sooner. I say sooner because since this article was written in 2013 a good deal of stores in Woonsocket closed or relocated (Shaw’s, Walmart, Dots, Home Depot, and Staples). Seeing firsthand how many businesses closed of recent is a clear indication of how the aid wasn’t enough. Still even going based on the information in the article, there were other indications of Woonsocket’s lagging business economy. For instance, one section mentions how Jourie thought Woonsocket was a “town disappeared into twisting two-lane roads, shadowy mills and abandoned smokestacks.” Mills were a strong economic center so long ago that the buildings should have been updated by more modern businesses. Yet, this hasn’t happened. It is a wonder how Woonsocket hasn’t figured out a way to attract more business from surrounding towns sooner given that government aide won’t keep business going.

 

Still, the people under this system are part of a process that doesn’t seem to stop repeating. Following the perspective of Rebecka, you see how businesses just tries to tempt the consumers who all flock to the stores on the first of the month falsely believing they are getting a better deal. Then you watch Rebecka try to shop under stress thereby causing her to spend money she shouldn’t be either. Then, when all is said and done, she looks longingly at the start of the calendar for the next first of the month. It appears the first of the month is on her mind even before it is well in sight. This type of thinking seems to trap Rebecka in an endless cycle of poverty. While I sympathize for the women who tried to get more work, she shouldn’t just continue on in a dead end job while barely surviving on food stamps. Go back to school, spread out how you spend the money, (maybe try saving some of it for more necessary items rather than tattoos), and change the cycle. The factors in the article show how this could be hard to do, but it isn’t impossible for her to gain control of her own life either.     

 

While I understand this trap is partly a result of the economic recession, there were other factors at play.  The story was partly told from the perspective of someone with a high school degree, who seemed to stop school because of a child. Given how much little someone makes when an individual fails to continue his/her schooling it is no wonder she is on food stamps. Furthermore, the fact that Woonsocket is full of low income housing continues to explain why so many people with food stamps flock to the town. If the people can’t really afford homes than it is no surprise they are on food stamps too. Woonsocket’s housing prices have always been like this even before the economic recession though. As such, the town’s population was already dependent on food stamps (something I am well aware of given that I live in the town next door). So I wonder just how much the economic recession actually increased the use of food stamps on the already poverty stricken town. 

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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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A Conversation with Jane Jacobs

A Conversation with Jane Jacobs | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Jane Jacobs is variously known as the guru of cities, an urban legend—“part analyst, part activist, part prophet.” In the more than forty years since the publication of her groundbreaking book The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), her influence has been extraordinary—not only on architects, community workers, and planners but also on Nobel Prize–winning economists and ecologists. As one critic recently put it, “Jacobs’s influence confirms that books matter. It isn’t easy to cite another writer who has had a comparable impact in our time.” A couple of years ago, she won the top American award for urban planning, the Vincent Scully Prize. This in itself was unusual, not only because she regularly vilifies planners, but also because with the exception of the Order of Canada and a few other prizes, she typically turns down awards—some thirty honorary degrees, including one from Harvard. Jacobs herself wasn’t interested in finishing university—she went to Columbia for just two years."

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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

BM: When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

 

SD: Why are sports teams treated so differently from other businesses?  How are teams linked to place in such intimate ways?  What is the economic impact of a sports team on the city and how could relocation damage that city?  See this scoop.it topic for more on the cultural and economic impacts of sports teams on cities.


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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 9:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 9:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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Clean Water for All

A community in Bonsaaso, Ghana learns that their local water supply contains unsafe mineral concentrations. See how they implement a filtration system design...

 

Ghana is one of the more stable nations in the region, and yet even it has serious issues with fresh water. This video shows how low-tech solutions can combat the tainting of water by environmental factors such as mineral contamination of water sources. The $5,000 price tag for such technology seems high, but is very affordable considering the benefits given.  Another organization working on this issue is: http://waterwellsforafrica.org/


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Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

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Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects

Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is modern cosmopolitan Bangkok, the second most expensive Southeast Asian city after Singapore.  Along with explosive city growth, the demand for urban housing has increased substantially. Due to a lack of sufficient and affordable housing, communities have settled into the cracks, eliciting a diagnosed social and institutional ‘pocket-urbanism’ that forms barriers of interaction among communities, and certainly between communities and authority figures...


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:45 PM

The poor of Bangkok have been settling their communities in the cracks of wealthier areas, creating a phenomenom of "pocket-urbanization." The artical talks about an emerging "ethical turn" in architecture. People will certainly enjoy their lives better when they are empowered in their own living situations, but also we have seen how poor infrastructure is a target for the worst of natural disasters. Rebuilding these areas would be good for many parties.