Geography Education
1.9M views | +832 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How to Train Your Dragon Child

How to Train Your Dragon Child | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, there’s a spike in births among certain communities across the globe, including the U.S. Why? Because the Year of the Dragon, according to Chinese folk belief, confers power, fortune, and more. We look at what happens to Dragon babies when they grow up, and why timing your kid’s birth based on the zodiac isn't as ridiculous it sounds.
Seth Dixon's insight:

1976. 1988. 2000. 2012.  We often assume that births on a graph in any given year will follow a smooth linear pattern similar to the years around it, but the Chinese zodiac and the mythical standing of the dragon can create spikes in diasporic communities away from the mainland.  This economic podcast offers an interesting glimpse into the looks some of the communal impacts of a mini-baby boom and cultural reasons for these patterns. 

 

Tags: Taiwanpodcast, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

China and Taiwan

China and Taiwan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Will China win its 65-year war with Taiwan -- without firing a shot?
Seth Dixon's insight:

As one analyst quoted in this article says, the whole point of China's policy is to try to create an environment where the people are Taiwan want to be unified with mainland China.  China has opened up economically towards Taiwan to foster this in "an offer they can't refuse." What would your position on this issue be if you were advising China, Taiwan or the United States?  

more...
Yiannis Tsingos's curator insight, February 15, 2014 4:57 PM

Great resource for conflict resolution

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:40 PM

China and Taiwan have been battling each other without physically fighting for decades. Nowadays someone needs to take charge and eliminate this battle. Can China do it without releasing its militia?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Countries Participating in the 2012 Olympic Games in London

Countries Participating in the 2012 Olympic Games in London | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Discover the number of countries participating in the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London. Find out which countries are not participating in the Olympic Games and learn which non-countries are participating as well.

 

204 countries are participating in the Olympics?  There aren't even 204 countries in the world!  This article looks at the political geography of international recognition.   One interesting case not discussed in the article is that of Taiwan.  Taiwan is participating, but marched under a non-Taiwanese flag under the name Chinese Taipei because the IOC wanted the mainland Chinese to return to the games. Also, South Sudan, Kosovo and the Vatican are not participating (although pondering them competing, especially the Vatican, is something that deeply amuses me).  Another intriguing thought: how many of the participants were former British colonies?   There are more classroom resources based on the Olympics from the GA.

more...
Emily Larsson's comment, August 26, 2013 9:08 PM
I love the Olympics! Its amazing how almost all of the countries in the world can come together for an event and forget about the conflicts they have back at home.
Jason Charles Wright's curator insight, April 27, 2017 11:51 AM
Countries are participating in the Olympics, but are not even a country. These countries are not even under the proper flag like Taiwan and South Sudan and Kosovo and the Vatican. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The unbearable sadness of being Taiwan, a liberal island other democracies refuse to talk to

The unbearable sadness of being Taiwan, a liberal island other democracies refuse to talk to | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An island, a territory, a self-governing entity, a renegade province, a breakaway part of China, the place formerly known as Formosa—call Taiwan any of those things, but never a country, a state, or a nation. The simple fact that it took a phone call between US president-elect Donald Trump and Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen to draw attention to one of Asia’s most vibrant democracies highlights the humiliating plight of Taiwan in the international arena. The irony that the US and other democratic countries cannot openly recognize Taiwan’s achievements for fear of incurring Beijing’s wrath has not been lost on many observers, who nevertheless fear that a cavalier move by Trump to upend diplomatic protocol in such a way could ultimately end badly for little Taiwan."

 

Tags: Taiwan, political, states, borders, geopoliticsEast Asia.

more...
Loreto Vargas's curator insight, December 12, 2016 10:01 AM
This behaviour towards Taiwan of the so-called “democratic” countries is unfair and their submission to China is unacceptable. But that’s the way things go and Chile is benefiting from this cowardice. Let’s put a stop to the made in China!
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]

Seth Dixon's insight:

This image and analysis comes from the blog "Geographically Yours" by Don Zeigler.  He's a well-traveled cultural geographer and has been collecting great teaching images over his career and is now sharing them on this site.  These pictures are great discussion starters and bell ringers to start the day.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG, images.

more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:13 AM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:30 PM

Summery: This article shares the importance and relevance of the Von Thunen model, even in modern agriculture. It also touches on urban population demands and how it effects the size of the Von Thunen model, bring the last level much closer to the city center. 

 

Insight: I think that with urban demands of fresh foods, it is absolutely correct to have to shift the Von Thunen model. Of course, in its time the model was correct, but with the growing agribusiness, it's no longer 100% accurate.