Geography Education
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Miguel Alfaro's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:51 PM

Informacion de Latinos en los Estados Unidos.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities. 

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:45 PM

In this report, a researcher describes the relationship between geography and literacy on educational terms. When combined, these two very similar topics would provide major benefits to a child curriculum in school giving them a better insight on geography through literary concepts. These certain concepts help kids better recognize relationships within graphs and charts that give valuable geographic information. This article helps prove geography as a field of inquiry based on its relations with other subjects that help enhance the knowledge among the children in any school curriculum. 

terciduklagi's comment, February 17, 1:14 AM
https://www.scoop.it/u/mufidmmn
Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:13 AM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:30 PM

Summery: This article shares the importance and relevance of the Von Thunen model, even in modern agriculture. It also touches on urban population demands and how it effects the size of the Von Thunen model, bring the last level much closer to the city center. 

 

Insight: I think that with urban demands of fresh foods, it is absolutely correct to have to shift the Von Thunen model. Of course, in its time the model was correct, but with the growing agribusiness, it's no longer 100% accurate. 

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

Rescooped by Emily Fueger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.