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Infographic: The Syrian conflict

Infographic: The Syrian conflict | Geography | Scoop.it
Syria's civil war has inflicted a humanitarian crisis, expansive exodus of the population and a severe death toll. New Internationalist presents the facts in this zoomable infograph.

 

Tags: infographic, Syria, migration, political, refugees.


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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:29 AM

This might help if any questions come up, particularly if working with upper KS2 or beyond.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 8:54 PM

unit 2

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This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | Geography | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:00 PM

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

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Geospatial Technologies Transforming Lives - Geoporter

Geospatial Technologies Transforming Lives - Geoporter | Geography | Scoop.it
Educating residents, teachers and youth in a costal community in Costa Rica to use geospatial technologies to investigate, map and make a difference.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:33 PM

If you are looking to find a practical example of how geospatial technologies can empower neighborhoods and students, take a look at the GEOPORTER project.  If you can assist, I can tell you that I know the people working on this project and am impressed by their work. 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 3, 2013 6:57 AM

Environmental management -.coastal and marine environments.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 19, 2014 6:30 PM

In Costa Rica

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | Geography | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 10:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 2:02 AM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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The Armenian Genocide-100 years

The Armenian Genocide-100 years | Geography | Scoop.it

“For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter you know next to nothing about. But every year on April 24, Genocide Remembrance Day, we Armenians remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors.”


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 18, 2015 12:37 AM

A 100 AÑOS DEL GENOCIDIO ARMENIO

Cada año el 24 de abril, día de la conmemoración del Genocidio, nosotros los armenios recordamos la injusticia de un crimen que rara vez se reconoció y a menudo negó rotundamente.

Era el 24 de abril de 1915, cuando los intelectuales armenios, profesionales, editores y líderes religiosos de Constantinopla fueron detenidos por las autoridades otomanas - y casi todos ellos ejecutados. Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, el Imperio Otomano mató a tres de cada cuatro de sus ciudadanos armenios. La mayoría de los armenios vivos hoy son descendientes de los pocos sobrevivientes ".

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 9:17 PM

I have to be honest, I never knew we had a Genocide Remembrance Day.  As I get older, there seems to be a day for everything.  This is a horrific act.  Unfortunately, as we've seen historically many countries have tried this.  There is never a good outcome.  It's atrocious that we could ever standby and not do something.  

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 11:24 PM

Unit 3

For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter we know almost nothing about. But every year on April 24,Genocide Remembrance Day, Armenians all over the world remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 12:53 PM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 3:48 PM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:59 AM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 8:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | Geography | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...
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The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day

The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day | Geography | Scoop.it
The daily tally of rocket attacks, airstrikes and deaths in the conflict between Israel and Hamas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2014 7:26 PM

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, July 28, 2014 8:17 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


TagsIsraelPalestineconflictpoliticalborders.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 11:57 PM

APHG-U3 & U4

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The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030

The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030 | Geography | Scoop.it
New York, Osaka, and Sao Paulo won't even make the top 10.
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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Geography | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 8:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 8:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 4:40 PM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 11:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 23, 2015 12:16 AM

Pretty cool.

 

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Geography Poster

Geography Poster | Geography | Scoop.it

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Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, November 9, 2013 11:02 AM

Why care? It's all right here!

 

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, November 9, 2013 12:17 PM

Poster sobre la enseñanza de la geografía

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:39 AM

can be used for the inquiry process

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Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2015 2:04 AM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 2015 5:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.

 

Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:35 PM

Yep - its from ESRI

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:14 PM

This video relates to Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps. It tells about how the world is a 3D shape, but we view it as 2D, which leads to distortions in world size. The use of GIS allows for the world to be projected onto any shape such as a cone, rectangle, prism, or pyramid. And this leads to the different map projections. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:31 PM

Ch 1 Map Projections

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China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S.

China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S. | Geography | Scoop.it

"In 2013, China replaced Mexico as the top sending country for immigrants to the United States. This followed a decade where immigration from China and India increased while immigration from Mexico decreased."


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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:31 PM

Push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life-

This article explains how China in 2013 had more immigrants going to the US than Mexico. The reasons why were because of jobs and better life styles in the US.

This article represents push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life by showing why china had more immigrants going to the US because of job opportunities and better life styles.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 3:18 AM

I can already imagine the reactions I would receive from a couple of people I know if I were to post something like this on Facebook. Too often, popular opinion trumps fact, which contributes to the continued existence of stereotypes and inherently racist beliefs/institutions. I find it particularly humorous that the bulk of anti-immigration sentiment is cast at the Hispanic-American population now knowing that they do not even compromise the largest immigrant populations now entering the country! It makes it painfully obvious that this hate of Hispanic immigrants held by many Americans is less about "job security" and more about racism. I will, however, point out that the census bureau doe not account for illegal immigration to my knowledge, and I would be interested to see how this would affect the data presented in this article. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 10:57 PM

accompany "What is Normal" vidoe

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Geography | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 4:43 PM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 11:20 PM

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but its influence is still present in today's Germany. History plays a key role in the shaping of political boundaries and that history is clearly evident in Germany. The line where the Berlin wall once stood still divides the country economically. The western part of Germany is far more economically affluent than the east. The USSR may be gone, but its influence still remains. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 1:14 PM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, labor, economic, historical, political, borders.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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mary jane james's curator insight, April 7, 2017 7:55 PM
This video relates to my subject on religion by showing the five main religions and how they're changing the world and prospective of how people see themselves on earth.
 My opinion on the video is that is good to see that all of the religions are somewhat related by where and how they were created, and also what is shown in them.
 
Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 12, 2017 2:53 AM
This article relates to are class because it is talking about different religions. It states that we all have different beliefs, but we believe in a higher power. This article was interesting because it shows you how different your beliefs are to other religions. They all have a story they believe is true.
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 3:27 PM
Unit 3 - Religion
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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Geography | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.
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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | Geography | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 11:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 3:46 PM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 27, 2014 3:32 AM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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Child Migrants Have Been Coming to America Alone Since Ellis Island | Blog | BillMoyers.com

Child Migrants Have Been Coming to America Alone Since Ellis Island | Blog | BillMoyers.com | Geography | Scoop.it
The Immigration Act of 1907 declared that unaccompanied children under 16 were not permitted to enter America in the normal fashion. But it didn’t send them packing, either.
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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Geography | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.

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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:06 PM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:02 AM

APHG-U4

VEILLOT Mathieu's curator insight, December 6, 2017 5:48 PM
Les camps de réfugiés syriens en Jordanie deviennent des villes "fait maison"

Suite à l'expansion territoriale de Daech au Moyen-Orient , des millions de personnes et principalement des syriens, ont été contraints à fuir la guerre et les bombardements en se réfugiant dans les pays voisins. En Jordanie, un camp de réfugiés syriens devient au fil du temps une véritable ville : Zaatari. Le camp est parcellisé selon un ordre militaire avec des abris en tôle, un plancher en terre battue et des toilettes publiques insalubres. On est passé de 11 000 à 85 000 réfugiés syriens qui vivent dans le camp prévu pour accueillir jusqu'à 100 000 personnes. C'est devenu une place dynamique, ce qui n'était pas prévu par les structures humanitaires qui dirige le camp. l'axe principal est semblable à celui de n'importe quelle ville avec des magasins alignés, des vendeurs de légumes, des boutiques de vêtement, etc. Des services comme un livreur de pizza, ou une agence de voyage. On parle de poussée civilisationnelle dans l'un des endroits les plus désespérés au monde à l'heure actuelle. Un véritable sentiment d'appartenance au lieu est né, l'exil prolongé de ces familles amène à penser un camp de réfugiés destiné à fonctionner à long terme. Un membre d'une structure humanitaire, Mr Kleinschmidt, dit "on conçoit des camps de réfugiés, les réfugiés construisent des villes". Ces réfugiés syriens redeviennent petit à petit mettre de leur destin, de leur territoire. Sans être utopique, c'est important qu'ils puissent se sentir comme chez eux en attendant de pouvoir retrouver leur maison. C'est d'autant plus fascinant que cette "incubateur urbain" se réalise dans le desert jordanien avec des conditions de vie très rudes. En Turquie, les camps de réfugiés sont en matière d'équipement mieux lôtis mais les intitiatives des réfugiés sont réprimées, contrairement à Zaatari.
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Ethiopia's Dam Problems

Ethiopia's Dam Problems | Geography | Scoop.it

"Ethiopia is three years from completing a dam to control its headwaters, and while Egypt points to colonial-era treaties to claim the water and to stop the project, the question remains as to who own the Blue Nile."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2014 1:00 AM

Option: Inland water 

dilaycock's curator insight, July 22, 2014 2:09 AM

Useful example to illustrate the interactions and tensions between natural resources and political systems.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 27, 2014 3:38 AM

At least the Murray-Darling Basin is within one country - even if it covers 4 states!