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Rescooped by Luke Gray from IB Geography @NIST
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In 2050 there will be 9 billion people on earth​. H​ow to feed them

In 2050 there will be 9 billion people on earth​. H​ow to feed them | Geography | Scoop.it
Have we reached ‘peak farmland’? Patrick Barkham digs into a new book about food and the future, while Chris Newell provides a graphic summary of the challenges ahead

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Linking the most interesting places in the world

Linking the most interesting places in the world | Geography | Scoop.it
The Geotaggers’ World Atlas is my long-term project to discover the world’s most interesting places and the routes that people follow between them. Five years ago I first starte

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Rescooped by Luke Gray from IB GEOGRAPHY URBAN ENVIRONMENTS LANCASTER
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What Dubai's Newest Theme Park Reveals About Its Urbanism

What Dubai's Newest Theme Park Reveals About Its Urbanism | Geography | Scoop.it
The city’s latest diversion might spur the economy, but it excludes the majority of the population.

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Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped | Geography | Scoop.it
The world is experiencing rapid urbanisation, but not every city is growing. Population is likely to decline in 17% of large cities in developed regions and 8% of cities across the world from 2015 to 2025, according to a McKinsey report

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Adelaide gets Australia's first aerial park - SpiceNews

Adelaide gets Australia's first aerial park - SpiceNews | Geography | Scoop.it
The MegaAdventure Aerial Park will open its doors this Friday.

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The North American City

Geography of the United States & Canada

 

Tags: urban, prezi, planning, urbanism, architecture, North America.


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This airborne river may be the largest river on earth

This airborne river may be the largest river on earth | Geography | Scoop.it
On a typical sunny day in the Amazon, 20 billion metric tons of water pass through the trees and into the air. This is more than just a feat of Nature -- it’s at the heart of South America’s econom...
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Rescooped by Luke Gray from IB LANCASTER GEOGRAPHY CORE
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Explainer: Why Deforestation Happens (And Why It's Hard To Stop)

Explainer: Why Deforestation Happens (And Why It's Hard To Stop) | Geography | Scoop.it
NPR spent 2 weeks in the Amazon to find out. Take 10 mins to look at our photos and learn about why it's so hard for us to stop deforestation -- and what could happen if we don't.

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What is climate change?

What is climate change? | Geography | Scoop.it
Six graphics that explain climate change as world leaders gather in Paris for COP21.

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Saudi Arabia to build world's tallest building 1km tall

Saudi Arabia to build world's tallest building 1km tall | Geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is building the world's tallest tower. Once done, it will be 558 feet taller than the Burj Khalifa.

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Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 12:10 PM

To be quite frank with everything going on in the Middle East currently it is rather disgusting what Saudi Arabia does with its money. Rather than even act concerned over Syria or rebuild Yemen they decide to build a 2.2 billion dollar building that they don't need. They are also trying to build a ridiculously large building with this money for no practical reason other than to beat Abu Dhabi for the tallest building. It really highlights the wealth disparity not only in the Middle East but globally that they have this much disposable income. What is particularly frightening thought however is what will happen when the oil dries up and this type of spending leisure will be gone (a regime change would probably be the least of the countries worries due to its wasteful spending).

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How did clouds get their names? - Richard Hamblyn

How did clouds get their names? - Richard Hamblyn | Geography | Scoop.it
The study of clouds has always been a daydreamer’s science, aptly
founded by a thoughtful young man whose favorite activity was staring
out of the window at the sky. Richard Hamblyn tells the history of Luke
Howard, the man who classified the clouds and forever changed humanity’s
understanding of these changeable, mysterious objects.
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Deforestation of Amazon threatens acai, cacau and thousands of other tree species

Deforestation of Amazon threatens acai, cacau and thousands of other tree species | Geography | Scoop.it
By comparing maps of projected deforestation with data collected in the forest, researchers have determined the status of more than 15,000 Amazonian trees species.
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How Africa's fastest solar power project is lighting up Rwanda

How Africa's fastest solar power project is lighting up Rwanda | Geography | Scoop.it
East African plant is completed in less than a year – creating jobs and setting the country on the path to providing half its population with electricity by 2017

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Rio Olympic venues already falling into a state of disrepair

Rio Olympic venues already falling into a state of disrepair | Geography | Scoop.it
Six months on from the 2016 Games, many of Rio’s major Olympic venues have fallen into a state of disrepair – untenanted, looted and crumbling

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Skyscanner reveals ‘living like a local’ is top on the holiday list for Aussies

Skyscanner reveals ‘living like a local’ is top on the holiday list for Aussies | Geography | Scoop.it

Global travel search engine Skyscanner Australia has released the latest findings of their first-ever Skyscanner TravelContent Survey, which looked at the travel content consumption preferences, habits and behaviours of Aussie travellers. According to the survey, 44% of Aussie travellers will opt for travel activities that offer a local experience when on holiday. Hungry for that local experience, Australians will pass on a picturesque view at a busy restaurant, opting to taste the flavours from an authentic local restaurant, hidden away from the tourist district. Findings have also revealed that Australians are in search of anything adventurous (30%), seeking out activities that allow travellers to be one with nature, followed by visits to museums and art galleries that offer a cultural experience (9%). Find out more.


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The Average American Melts 645 Square Feet of Arctic Ice Every Year

The Average American Melts 645 Square Feet of Arctic Ice Every Year | Geography | Scoop.it
Global warming is hard to understand. This statistic isn’t.

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Mapped: The countries that use the most electricity (#1 might surprise you)

Mapped: The countries that use the most electricity (#1 might surprise you) | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Maree Whiteley
Luke Gray's insight:
Do you think we use too much electricity in Australia? Interesting set of data here for a variety of classroom activities. 
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 6, 2016 10:02 AM
Do you think we use too much electricity in Australia? Interesting set of data here for a variety of classroom activities. 
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Brixton's gentrification: How did the area's character change so much?

Brixton's gentrification: How did the area's character change so much? | Geography | Scoop.it
I met up with a friend recently and we lunched on the first floor of the Ritzy cinema bar in central Brixton in South London. As I placed my order, I remembered that the establishment where I was standing was the place where staff campaigned and went out on strike for a living wage.

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Drowning Megacities

Drowning Megacities | Geography | Scoop.it
On the front lines of the African climate battle.

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Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters | Geography | Scoop.it

"Urban planners are noticing a cultural gap between bike advocates and others who bike. Planners see a particular type of cyclist: a working-class person – usually a minority and often a recent immigrant – riding to work on whatever type of bike he can get his hands on. Those cyclists are men and women for whom biking isn’t an environmental cause or a response to an urban trend but a means of transportation that’s cheaper than a car and faster than walking."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 2015 5:21 PM

Those that fight for bike lanes are not representative of all the cyclists.  These invisible cyclists are show that the cycling is an economic strategy for many of the urban poor, just as it can be a social statement for wealthy bike riders.


Tags: mobility, transportation, socioeconomic, class, planning.

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Behind China's Obsession With Something Called 'Sponge Cities'

Behind China's Obsession With Something Called 'Sponge Cities' | Geography | Scoop.it

The country's cities just keep flooding.

 

Could sponge cities be the answer to China’s floods?

 

Three years ago, when flooding in Beijing killed 79 people, the Chinese government was quick to blame the size of the storm, not the city’s failing drainage system. But the excuse didn’t persuade the public. News reports of fatal floods come as regularly to city dwellers as the annual monsoon season.

 

No longer just a problem for farmers living on flood-prone plains, water has become the nemesis of China’s 680 million urbanites, whose concrete landscape was not built adequately to withstand the forces of nature.


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'In an uncertain and unsafe world, we all need geography more than ever'

'In an uncertain and unsafe world, we all need geography more than ever' | Geography | Scoop.it
How quickly things change. Twenty years ago, we were marvelling at the dismantling of the Eastern Bloc, and digesting the globalising implications of the internet. Francis Fukuyama could write (seriously) about the "end of history". Now, though, everything seems more complicated, and more frightening. Yes, growing up in the 1960s, 70s and even 80s, we lived under the threat of nuclear apocalypse, and random bombs were a feature of urban life. But somehow it seems different today.

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Sydney's inner-city needs to embrace football traditions and provide 'spaces to play'

Sydney's inner-city needs to embrace football traditions and provide 'spaces to play' | Geography | Scoop.it
Football on the Pyrmont peninsula is poised for a comeback 87 years after it disappeared - a key plank in a "Spaces to Play" campaign aimed at securing desperately needed sporting space for inner Sydney.
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10 homes on a 600 square metre block: new plan for Greater Sydney

10 homes on a 600 square metre block: new plan for Greater Sydney | Geography | Scoop.it
Sydney's future housing will mirror of its working-class past, in a vision outlined by the state's planning minister on Friday.
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The mysterious case of the disappearing lakes: What happened to Broken Hill's water?

The mysterious case of the disappearing lakes: What happened to Broken Hill's water? | Geography | Scoop.it
Who let the plug out? Who stole Broken Hill's water? Who drained the lakes? Was it mismanagement, theft or bad policy or simply evaporation? Can ongoing droughts carry all the blame?
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