Geography
27 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 5:17 PM
This page tackles the problem of the lack of toilets in India. There are many comedians poking fun at the serious issues, which is not uncommon for comedians. Unfortunately these are serious issues, people are dying, especially children. 24% of girls drop out of school due to lack of proper toilets. Hopefully these comedians bring more light to the issue so it can begin to be addressed more seriously. 
Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:16 PM

This article is quite interesting... It seems as though this new canal might be good just because it will be much bigger than the current Panama Canal, allowing tankers and other large ships that cannot traverse the Panama Canal to be able to get from the Atlantic to the Pacific or vise versa. The only thing that does not sound so good about it is the fact that it may cut through Lake Nicaragua, which is the largest source of fresh water. On top of that, it claims it will not rival the Panama Canal, but to me it seems as if it would because ships would not have to travel as far south as they do now to get to the Panama Canal. Another good feature about this canal though is the canal might be able to lift Nicaragua out of Poverty and formal employment will increase because of the Canal. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:35 PM

Having a new canal that is going through the area of Nicaragua seems to be a Nicaragua and China fighting for rights to get through Central America with the US and Panama. If this were approved it could boost economic taxes between the two nations as they would be presumably argue over who is going to have the cheaper taxes. Not sure if this is a good idea or a bad one.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | Geography | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 2014 3:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State | Geography | Scoop.it

"Islamic State's capture of the Mosul dam gives it control over the water and electricity supply in northern Iraq."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 2014 10:00 PM

This is interesting, ISIS is not only using brute force as a scare tactic, but are also taking hold of natural resources as well.  In taking over the dam ISIS has control of not only a majority of Iraq's water supply but their power supply as well.  They are also threatening employees with loss of pay to do what they want.  Closing off some parts of the dam is preventing water to get to people who are in need.  If the dam was to get backed up too much it could have immediate failure creating a devastating flood wiping out areas of agriculture having the potential for mass civilian casualties.  ISIS is not just taking over everything that they can, but have a method to what they are doing.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 8:14 PM

As the director of the Brookings Institution's Doha Centre in Qatar said, "There's a method in their madness. By gaining control of the area ISIS can flood and destroy homes within the region. Furthermore, they can disrupt the flow of electricity and how the land is irrigated. All of this could cause a great deal of damage to the society. In this light the dam is a pretty important part of Iraq. The fact that ISIS Manipulated he land to their benefit it highly intelligent.  


However, if the dam was in the hand of the United States, the area still isn't completely safe. people would perceive it to be because ISIS would no longer be threatening to use it as an immediate weapon. However, the author noticed that the dam needs constant maintenance and is built on unstable soil. Both of which can cause flooding. In fact, the "worst case scenario" would cause far more damage than ISIS has with the dam. 


Clearly, purposefully using the resources of an area to damage a population is more chilling the a poorly made structure because malice involved. However even in the hands of the United States, the dam shows just how dangerous manipulating nature can be on a local population. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:21 PM

This will have an enormous impact on drought for drinking, agriculture purposes or even the opposite.  This strategy could be used to flood the lands ruining agriculture.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Start of the Year Videos

"A great Florida teacher produced this video.  Visit his course website for additional incredible resources."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:44 PM

APHG-Intro

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:31 AM

This is an excellent collection of videos to frame the study of geography.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:11 PM

course intro

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:53 PM

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:40 PM

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
s smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch

Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch | Geography | Scoop.it

Global Forest Watch uses satellite imagery and other technologies to estimate forest usage, change, and tree cover (among other things). These estimates and their eventual actions used to be slow. Now they're near-real-time.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Geography | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Skills for the Digital Earth

Skills for the Digital Earth | Geography | Scoop.it

Elmhurst College’s Skills for the Digital Earth MOOC is a 4-week, online course designed to introduce how location technologies are used in society.
Ever stop to think about how important location is when using your smart phone? This educational MOOC begins with an elementary explanation of how society uses location in a myriad of disciplines. Geography, or rather, "where?" is important to all of us from various perspectives.
Within this MOOC, participants will learn what location technologies are used for, how the discipline developed and learn by doing via a series of scaffolded practical exercises. Online spatial software will be employed for any device using a browser which takes users through exercises and real world examples. It is appropriate for those with no prior experience with geographic information systems (GIS) software all the way to advanced users.
Skills for the Digital Earth will incorporate video lectures, interaction opportunities and discussion forums. Each module will feature a quiz and activities, and participants will receive a badge after each completed module to be used to demonstrate skills mastered.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:39 PM

I am very excited about this free MOOC offered through the Elmhurst College Online Center (they also offer the Graduate Certificate Program for AP Human Geography teachers).  The instructor, Dr. Rich Schultz is the Associate Director of the National Geospatial Technologies Center of Excellence.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Spend Your Weekend Gawking at Nearly 700 Old Maps of the U.S.

Spend Your Weekend Gawking at Nearly 700 Old Maps of the U.S. | Geography | Scoop.it
Okay, history buffs. We've got a challenge for you: Learn as much as you possibly can from the 700 odd maps just uploaded to the University of Richmond's Digital Scholarship Lab. Your brain will thank you later.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 3, 2014 11:07 AM

I just love old maps.  :)

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth

50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth | Geography | Scoop.it

"You’ve no doubt already come across some interesting finds on Google Earth. The post below attempts to compile the most fascinating sites other have stumbled upon browsing Google Earth. From natural formations to human structures, the world is a different place when viewed from above.  If you’re interested in seeing any of the places yourself, I’ve included the coordinates for every image shown below. Just copy and paste into Google Earth/Maps and explore for yourself!"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ann Marie Pelosky Poncet's curator insight, February 14, 2014 8:07 AM

IF you don't have time or money to travel, you can do so by following this link.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 14, 2014 10:26 PM

yes amazing geographic tool. I love zeroing in on Africa- so much more than sand and empty spaces.

ruth

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:09 PM

When first reading this and viewing the images that go along with it; it became clear that someone somewhere in te world was either looking for these or they stumbled across these specfic faces and shapes in the earth that we dont neccesarily get to see everyday. 28. Monkey Face 65.476721, -173.511416 Russia. This Russian Monkey face was very interesting to see and I would have never thought that their would be these types of images captured.  

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Geography | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.


A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.


Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis. 
 
Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Geography | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | Geography | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 2014 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:51 PM

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years. helps show the nature of change around the United States and its impact in the enviorment.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | Geography | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2014 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

Via Seth Dixon
Linda Rutledge Hudson's insight:

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:49 PM

unit 3

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile?

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile? | Geography | Scoop.it

"Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (known as Gerd) is now about 30% complete.  Once completed, in three years, it will be Africa's largest hydropower dam, standing some 170m (558ft) tall."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:06 PM

In an area fraught with political instability, non state actors, and rebel groups all too willing to fight for power and the wealth that comes from it - it will be interesting to see how the conflicts shift over time as this dam gets closer to completion. Will Egypt attempt to sabotage it or will they take a more diplomatic approach and try to work with the Ethiopian government diplomatically again?  Perhaps Egypt will whisper in to the ear of Sudan or the various "rebel" groups in the region, considering diplomatic means have apparently failed so far. With Sudan's use of the Blue River also going to be affected by Ethiopia's damming, it will be interesting to see if a cooperation between Egypt and Sudan occurs. Perhaps Ethiopia would like to see a deeper conflict between Sudan and South Sudan, keeping their affected neighbor off balance.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:47 PM

It is extremely difficult to divide a river. The Ethiopians will benefit immensely from this project but the Egyptians could lose everything if the Nile dries up. This is going to be a difficult problem to solve.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:45 PM

There is no way the whole Nile river is going to be dried up because of this damn. Ethiopia won't let that happen. To say that the river is going to have the same amount of water in it, thats not going to happen. Obviously the Gerd is going to have a huge impact on the water supply of the Nile but it definitely isn't going to dry up the whole thing!

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Richardson's comment, February 28, 2014 7:00 AM
I also appreciate the sentiment here, but as a geography teacher in high school I also find that students are missing very basic information about the world as it is right now. For example, many of my students can't identify more than about three countries in Africa, and I've had students in the past who could not even find the U.S. on a map. Now I force them to take the dreaded 'blank map' quizzes of the world. Its distressing, but it needs to be done. Interestingly, many of my lower level students like these types of tests because there are online games that teach them the locations in a fun way, and also because it is a very literal task. The ones who struggle with higher level material can at least succeed at this if they study.
PIRatE Lab's comment, February 28, 2014 11:16 AM
Yes, as Seth and several commenters have said, we need both. And too often my students don't seem to know the basic facts/history of a particular situation. You must know where you are coming from if you ever want to get to somewhere new.
SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:11 AM

Excellent resource about the importance of Geography in understanding the world of the 21st Century.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cycling Infrastructure

The Netherlands is well known for its excellent cycling infrastructure. How did the Dutch get this network of bicycle paths? Read more: http://bicycledutch.w...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:35 PM

This video depicts the way that the Dutch got there cycling in the early years and it also shows the maufacturing process in which goes into making a bike. In this video it goes flashbacks of how the bike has evolved throughtout generations and time.

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

Rescooped by Linda Rutledge Hudson from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

As American as Peanut Butter

As American as Peanut Butter | Geography | Scoop.it

During the Great Depression, peanut butter sandwiches were handed out in food lines. It was a low-cost, beneficially caloric meal—exactly what people needed. “It’s the Depression that makes the PB&J the core of childhood food,” says Andrew F. Smith, food historian. “It is one of those things that will bind children together regardless of nationality and ethnic group.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 25, 2014 1:07 PM

When I travel abroad, I see that others view widespread American consumption of peanut butter as perplexing.  It was during the Depression that many regions, ethnic groups and age cohorts were introduced to peanut butter and being a child friendly food only enhanced it's adoption as a food aid item.