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Rescooped by Katie Schmidt from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

Rescooped by Katie Schmidt from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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s smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

Rescooped by Katie Schmidt from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:37 PM

Based on the video and the safety of the Chinese workers they tame no precautions to staying safe. If they have this much lack of safety for themselves then how do they regard the safety of the people around them. As China is and has cities up and coming to mega cities with high rises and exponential expanding then how do they create their buildings? As fast as they went up and the city was created then how stable are their buildings?

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 12:06 PM
This mentality towards worker safety is why the United States cannot compete with Chinese labor costs. The blatant disregard for safety as seen in the video allows Chinese manufacturers and industry to focus on reaching as high a level of production as possible. In a way, workers are seen as expendable parts to the entire process. Combine that with the low wages paid to these workers have allowed the country to develop in an incredibly short period of time. By disregarding worker safety, China has a massive edge over more developed nations with strict worker safety regulations.
Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 12:31 PM
This video shows why China gets stuff done for so much cheaper than other countries in the world.  Worker safety and workplace safety is non-existent which is why jobs get done for so much cheaper in China.
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Video - Expansion of Amsterdam in the Seventeenth Century

An Amsterdam City Archives production.


Via Mathijs Booden
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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:45 AM

Some cities sprawl uncontrollably. Dutch cities tend not to, due to e.g. the historically high cost of reclaiming swamps, the need to fortify against European invaders and more recently the high population density. This animation shows the development of some of the earliest expansions of Amsterdam, the iconic canals.

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Geography | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, October 6, 2015 1:18 PM
Even thought this article is more picture based it shows a interesting example of what Mexico City is all about and how it is laid out. With the different layouts it's just amazing how many different one there are. There are normal standard rectangle and square layouts. One was even built on a drained lake in order to expand the city and prevent the city from flooding. One picture has what looks like a maze of roads and an interesting convergence of where the roads meet up. Overall with so many different layouts it could get confusing to one who may not be from there.
Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:40 PM

While this scoop may reflect neighborhoods in Mexico, I feel like there is alot to be learned from it. The way human activity greatly affect the geographical landscape is undeniable in these photos. Areas were at one point a beautiful lake, trees and wild life inhabited, are now concrete jungles. In most of these images you cannot even see a patch of grass.

 I would be excited to see how specific neighborhood cultures develop considering the close proximity of people. I think that could be a really neat study. Is it like America in the early 1900's, segregation of religions, languages, and ethnic backgrounds? Or are the people close,  and friendly?

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:19 PM

It is interesting to see how Mexico City is set up, very busy, very populated, very tight. In the satellite photos of Mexico City, you can point out a few interesting things, like one being the different class of people. Some people have landscapes, while other people just have neighbors that live close enough to shake hands with through windows. Something like this goes to show who has money, who does not. You can definitely see grid type patterns in the way housing was built, it appears as if geometry took some play in the shape of the city. The one thing that caught my eye on the satellite map and I find very cool, is the red line of canopies from ambulantes (street vendors).