Geography
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA

Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA | Geography | Scoop.it
Sea level is rising -- and at an accelerating rate -- largely in response to global warming.

Via Beth Dichter, Craig Day
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:56 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities.

Vloasis's curator insight, June 8, 2013 3:48 AM

Projections will vary on this, but it doesn't take a general consensus to see that it's happening.

Keith Thorogood's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:21 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Global warming computer models collapse; Arctic ice sheets rapidly expand as planet plunges into global cooling

Global warming computer models collapse; Arctic ice sheets rapidly expand as planet plunges into global cooling | Geography | Scoop.it
Global warming computer models collapse; Arctic ice sheets rapidly expand as planet plunges into global cooling

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48), Craig Day
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau

Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau | Geography | Scoop.it

Over 10 lesson plans for teaching demographics, migration, the demographic transition and more.  Included is a teaching packet, "making population real" specifically for the AP curriculum produced by the venerable Martha Sharma. 


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Geography | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
Scott D.Warner, PLS's comment, August 3, 2013 5:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Don't Miss This Awesome Bloom's Taxonomy Wheel ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Don't Miss This Awesome Bloom's Taxonomy Wheel ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Geography | Scoop.it

I am sharing with you today an awesome graphic on Bloom's Taxonomy  Question and Task Design Wheel.I find it really useful and thought you might like to have a look.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Craig Day
more...
Manuela Bazen's curator insight, April 18, 2013 5:58 AM

Mooi om 'm nu ook eens in een wiel te zien i.p.v driehoekig - om het even waar de punt zich bevindt;)

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, April 25, 2013 5:43 PM

Great resumé !

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Making Ecosystem Services Count - Water, Land and Ecosystems | CGIAR.org

Making Ecosystem Services Count - Water, Land and Ecosystems | CGIAR.org | Geography | Scoop.it

The CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE) and partners will be attending the 6th Annual ESP Conference: Making Ecosystem Services Count in Bali, Indonesia 26-30 August 2013.

 

The conference is organized by the Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) and convened by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and CGIAR Research Program: Forests, Trees and Agroforestry. 

 

While agricultural development has progressed in leaps and bounds to feed the global population, it has not come without environmental and production costs. These environmental costs have limited the ecosystem services on which we depend, including agricultural production as well as access to clean water, protection from natural disasters and fertile soils.

 

Ecosystem services and resilience is a cross-cutting theme of WLE.  The theme focuses on ecosystem service-based approaches which aim to move beyond agriculture that ‘does no harm’, to an integrated approach that boosts agricultural production concurrently with other benefits such as soil and water quality, biological conservation, and increased resilience of rural communities.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot link to download the framework document--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Craig Day
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Up to 50 coral species at high risk of extinction

Up to 50 coral species at high risk of extinction | Geography | Scoop.it
Report: Up to 50 coral species at high risk of extinctionSummit County Citizens VoiceThe diversity of coral reef ecosystems is at risk from climate change and other threats outlined in a new federal report.

Via Book Your Dive, Craig Day
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Global and National Population Pyramids

Global and National Population Pyramids | Geography | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

 


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

If you struggle with population structure - this visualisation may be useful. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:09 PM

This website allows the user to look into the past, and into the future of population all over the world. The population pyramids show the distribution between young and elder people. It is very interesting to see how the pyramid is able to show the predicted population pyramid of the future as well. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 6:39 PM

Access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation - Population pyramids show population of different ages from each gender in a certain country. From population pyramids, you can conclude a country's development level. For example, if there is an equal population of all ages, this means that they have amazing health care, great education to educate women about birth control towards population, and good sanitation. From all of this information, you can tell how developed a country may be and perhaps also whether the country has many cities And urbanization. 

Rescooped by Helen Wynd from HSC Geography
Scoop.it!

Population Density

Population Density | Geography | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon, Craig Day
more...
Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia.