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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | geography | Scoop.it
“ Mapping global conflict month by month.”
Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 2014 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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See That Little Dot in the Sahara Desert? If You Zoom In, What You’re Going to See Is Amazing.

See That Little Dot in the Sahara Desert? If You Zoom In, What You’re Going to See Is Amazing. | geography | Scoop.it
“ Discover this wonderful marvel.”
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MAP: Every Country's Highest-Valued Export

MAP: Every Country's Highest-Valued Export | geography | Scoop.it
“ Australia makes the most money from coal.”
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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | geography | Scoop.it
"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."
Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:16 PM

This article is quite interesting... It seems as though this new canal might be good just because it will be much bigger than the current Panama Canal, allowing tankers and other large ships that cannot traverse the Panama Canal to be able to get from the Atlantic to the Pacific or vise versa. The only thing that does not sound so good about it is the fact that it may cut through Lake Nicaragua, which is the largest source of fresh water. On top of that, it claims it will not rival the Panama Canal, but to me it seems as if it would because ships would not have to travel as far south as they do now to get to the Panama Canal. Another good feature about this canal though is the canal might be able to lift Nicaragua out of Poverty and formal employment will increase because of the Canal. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:35 PM

Having a new canal that is going through the area of Nicaragua seems to be a Nicaragua and China fighting for rights to get through Central America with the US and Panama. If this were approved it could boost economic taxes between the two nations as they would be presumably argue over who is going to have the cheaper taxes. Not sure if this is a good idea or a bad one.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | geography | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.

Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 2014 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | geography | Scoop.it
“ Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.”
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

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This map shows every school shooting since Sandy Hook

This map shows every school shooting since Sandy Hook | geography | Scoop.it
“There have been 74 gun incidents at schools in America since Sandy Hook. Here they all are.”
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Here are the 31 countries Google Maps won't draw borders around - Quartz

Here are the 31 countries Google Maps won't draw borders around - Quartz | geography | Scoop.it
“Here are the 31 countries Google Maps won't draw borders around Quartz Google may be standing up to government surveillance, but on Google Maps it shies away from conflict.”
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The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS, in Five Maps

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS, in Five Maps | geography | Scoop.it
“With Tuesday's seizure of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria notched a major victory in its campaign to create a new country containing parts of what had part of both Syria and Iraq.”
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What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory

What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory | geography | Scoop.it
“ Can you draw a map of the world just from memory? And if you did, how accurate do you think your map would be? Probably not very.”
Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:34 PM

Honestly, I don't think I could do much better (although I could nit-pick this to death).

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This Map Shows How Fast Old People Are Taking Over the World

This Map Shows How Fast Old People Are Taking Over the World | geography | Scoop.it
“ In a recent Simpsons episode, a Japanese tourist moves in with Comic Book Guy, infuriating her father, who exclaims: “Daughter, you are coming back to Japan; there are 87 old people who need you to take care of them!” Japan’s exceptionally old population—23 percent of it is 65 or older,...”
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Introducing Mapping Skills Lesson Plan – Year 2/3/4 - Australian Curriculum Lessons

Introducing Mapping Skills Lesson Plan – Year 2/3/4 - Australian Curriculum Lessons | geography | Scoop.it
Summary of Lesson Plan: This lesson introduces students to mapping skills using a grid reference to locate places and position on a map.
Via Maree Whiteley, Malmci@Spatialzone
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7 Of the Most Interesting Maps of Our World! » Fascinating Pics

7 Of the Most Interesting Maps of Our World! » Fascinating Pics | geography | Scoop.it
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New York City Musical References, Mapped

New York City Musical References, Mapped | geography | Scoop.it
“ As the nation's cultural mecca, New York City has been honored by musicians inside and outside the five boroughs. They invoke its streets and namecheck its neighborhoods in song after song. Wikipedia hosts a list of songs about New York City.”
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Map - The most common language in each US state, after English and Spanish

Map - The most common language in each US state, after English and Spanish | geography | Scoop.it

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NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time

NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time | geography | Scoop.it
“ Examine global population growth over the past two millennia, and see what's coming in the next 50 years.”
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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | geography | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.



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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 2014 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 2014 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2014 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | geography | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 2014 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | geography | Scoop.it
"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."
Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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Google Adds Graffiti to Its Art Portfolio

Google Adds Graffiti to Its Art Portfolio | geography | Scoop.it
“The new Street Art Project includes graffiti and other works from around the globe, including some that no longer exist.”
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Another New Easter Egg In Google Maps: Travel By Royal Carriage - Search Engine Land

Another New Easter Egg In Google Maps: Travel By Royal Carriage - Search Engine Land | geography | Scoop.it
“Search Engine Land Another New Easter Egg In Google Maps: Travel By Royal Carriage Search Engine Land Google announced a new easter egg in Google Maps today via Google+ where if you do driving directions from Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle,...”
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27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary.

27 Magical Photos That Prove Why Getting The Airplane Window Seat Is Absolutely Necessary. | geography | Scoop.it
“ I'm NEVER falling asleep on an airplane again!”
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Teaching Basic Map Skills To Young Children - Geolounge

Teaching Basic Map Skills To Young Children - Geolounge | geography | Scoop.it
“ It’s never too early to teach young children spatial awareness. Teaching children how to read a map and relate it to real world objects can start when they are fairly young. Teaching basic map skills can be achieved through reading books about mapping as well as hands on mapping lessons. Henry’s [...]”
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This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico

This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico | geography | Scoop.it
“ Mexico has an inequality problem. The uneven distribution of wealth is perhaps best illustrated by a series of images captured by photographer Oscar Ruíz in Mexico City. Produced by ad firm Publicis, the campaign seeks to to highlight the huge...”
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11 maps and charts for mother's day - Washington Post (blog)

11 maps and charts for mother's day - Washington Post (blog) | geography | Scoop.it
“11 maps and charts for mother's day Washington Post (blog) Federal data show that a larger share of mothers with children under 18 were working in 2011 than were working in 1975. Labor force participation among that group rose from 47.”
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