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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | Geography | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo

The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo | Geography | Scoop.it

If you own a smartphone and are trying to learn a language, you probably have Duolingo. English is far and away the most dominant, with a caveat: For some learners, English is the only language Duolingo offers with translation into their native tongue. That doesn’t change the fact of universal interest in English, though, which Duolingo notes is studied by 53% of its users. Things get more interesting when you look at the second-most popular language by country. There French takes the lead, followed by Spanish, German, and Portuguese.

 

Tags: language, colonialism, technology, diffusion, culture, English.


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Madison Murphy's curator insight, March 13, 2017 3:15 PM
This article "The Languages The World Is Trying To Learn, According To Duolingo" relates to language in Human Geography because it is an app that describes how languages are being spread but also how countries are picking a certain language to be able to communicate with, which is English.  Countries are picking English because they are needing a language to be able to communicate with other countries.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, March 13, 2017 8:45 PM
This reflects to what we are learning in  class because  the articles talking about language. It's talking about how we all really have one language in come in all around the world. I think this is a good idea to have when your working with other countries or you are visiting them.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, April 6, 2017 3:09 PM
This relates to my class because its talking about religion. It states that in many different parts in the world it is very dominate  to learn English. But whats more interesting is that French is right after us. It talks about why English is so popular. Which is because its a language you can use when you visit places and you will be able to communicate. I think this article is interesting  because it is talking about how we are the most popular language but its one of the most complicated one to learn. I also would understand why English is most learned because a lot of people want to visit Florida or even move their.
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Geographic analysis for the zombie apocalypse

Can geography save your life in case of, say, a zombie apocalypse? Understanding the push and pull factors that create geographic movement -- or how people, resources, and even ideas travel -- might help you determine the location that's best for survival. David Hunter playfully analyzes the geography skills that you'd need to escape the zombies.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 24, 2017 3:48 PM

This tongue -in-cheek TED-ED lesson shows how the concepts of movement are spatial, and of course, critical in an zombie apocalypse.  Good vocabulary (push factors, pull factors, migration, infrastructure, etc.) is used in this clip.  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, TED, video.

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English--Origins and Roots

When we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? Claire Bowern traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:30 PM

English has obviously changed much over the years, but this video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European, using the English as the main example.  This other TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin).   

 

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

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Gibraltar Bay

Gibraltar Bay | Geography | Scoop.it

"Gibraltar Bay, located near the southernmost tip of the Iberian Peninsula, is the central feature of this astronaut photograph. The famous Rock of Gibraltar that forms the northeastern border of the bay is formed of Jurassic-era seafloor sediments that solidified into limestone, a rock formed mostly of the mineral calcite, which is found in the shells of sea creatures. The limestone was subsequently lifted above the ocean surface when the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2017 3:58 PM

Gibraltar is an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea; there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. "La Linea" marked on the image is the international border

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are both Spain and the UK invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British supranational connections impact this issue?

 

Tags: borders, political, Spain, Europe.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 9, 1:37 PM
(Europe) Gibraltar Bay is an important economic and political region located on the very southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula. The UK owns city of Gibraltar while the surrounding area is in Spain. The Strait of Gibraltar is a passage separating Spain in Europe and Morocco in Africa, allowing transport between the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The area has tactical value because of the inflow of ships and its geographic position, but also houses oil processing and tourism industries.
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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2017 2:24 PM

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:18 PM
population

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Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods

Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods | Geography | Scoop.it

This week has seen disasters and destruction on an unprecedented scale, and the HOT Community has activated to respond. Hurricane Irma is the largest Hurricane ever recorded, and has torn death and destruction through the Caribbean. Destruction on some islands is estimated at 95%, affecting the lives of 1.2 million so far, and on track to cause severe destruction across the entire Florida State, where mass evacuation is currently underway. Barbuda’s prime minister, Gaston Browne, described the damage as absolutely heart-wrenching. 'The island is literally under water and barely habitable,' Browne said. 'About 95% of properties are damaged, there is a serious threat of disease. Additionally, those already affected by Irma fear a second brutal battering by Hurricane Jose.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 2017 3:46 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Geography | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:18 PM
Population

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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise | Geography | Scoop.it
Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 1, 2017 10:55 PM

Geographic themes are overflowing (it was an unintended pun, but I'll just let that wash over you) in this podcast.  I suggest playing a game early in the year/semester called "find the geography."  What geographic theme/content areas will your students find in this podcast? 

 

Tagspodcast, mapping, cartography, climate change, environment, watercoastal,  urban, planningurban ecology.

M Sullivan's curator insight, August 6, 2017 9:14 PM
Useful for Geographical Processes Unit of Inquiry
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Geology of the World of Game of Thones

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A fun way to imagine the geographic and geologic forces of nature, using Westeros as the topic.
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What can I do with a Geography Degree?

What can I do with a Geography Degree? | Geography | Scoop.it

"While it is easy to understand getting excited about maps, different cultures and environments, and even being better citizens through geography, it is harder to see how geographic knowledge can lead to good jobs or meaningful careers. In recent years, people have discovered that large numbers of societal problems have geographic dimensions, and that education and training in geography provides essential skills and knowledge for real-world problem solving. As a result, geography has become a necessary ingredient in hundreds of different jobs. This assortment of careers helps demonstrate the wide array of employment opportunities that exist for graduates with education in the field of geography. Within this publication, careers are divided into a number of different employment categories, including:

​Geography EducationEnvironmental GeographyGeospatial TechnologiesLand Use Planning
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 15, 2017 3:04 PM
Geographic Concepts: Geographic Perspective and Geographic Skills And Careers
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 27, 2017 10:36 AM
what can i do with a degree in geography? ALOT!
Kami Romeike's curator insight, August 26, 2:11 AM

Many students enjoy geography classes but aren't sure about what they can do with this geography degree.  This StoryMap from the Texas Alliance for Geographic Education is an excellent resource.  Additionally, the American Association of Geographers career page is a phenomenal resource.   

 

TagseducationESRIStoryMap, geography, geography education.

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APHG Promo Video

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  See more promotional videos/start-of-the-year clips at http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1ec


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2017 3:33 PM

This is just one of my favorite "start of the year" videos.  I've compiled them for when you need to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy.  Collectively, they show why taking geography courses is so important, useful and interesting. 

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 15, 2017 4:11 PM
Love this video introducing the study of Geography. Its dramatic and diverse in the issues it introduces.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 2017 10:37 AM
Believe the hype
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The World's Newest (Official) Ocean

The World's Newest (Official) Ocean | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60 degrees south latitude. The Southern Ocean is now the fourth largest of the world's five oceans (after the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Indian Ocean, but larger than the Arctic Ocean). The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) has  declared, named, and demarcated the Southern Ocean as a fifth, separate ocean."


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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 11, 12:47 PM
The Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Artic as an American student growing up those were the Oceans that I grew up learning about. So to see an article talking about the Southern Ocean comes as kind of a surprise. We learn as young American students about "Atlantic trade" or our West Coast with "Pacific Trade" we as young students learn about the mysterious Indian Ocean and the unattainable Artic Ocean,  but for some reason the Southern Ocean has been left out. The Southern Ocean as the article explains is the 5th and newest Ocean. Ocean scientist thought it was necessary to name the the body of water south of the Pacific but north of the Artic. While it might not seem that important to some it is key to identify with areas. When we discuss Atlantic trade for the most part in the United States we know we are discussing trade with the Europeans or on our East Coast. When discussing Pacific trade we understand that to be West Coast and probably dealing with China or other Asian countries. As an Australian resident or student they grow up learning about this key body of water to them. They can use it to identity where they are and where they are going. We can also use the body of water to discuss different weather pattern and effects on the countries in Oceania region of the world. An interesting read if  you want to learn more about our forgotten 5th Ocean. 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 24, 12:22 PM
This is slightly embarrassing to admit, but I have never heard of the Southern Ocean.  I think it is because, as mentioned in class the other day, we do not talk about the Southern Hemisphere very often.  When looking a globe this entire ocean is on the bottom and pretty much out of sight.  I thought that it was interesting that the creation of this ocean was created within my lifetime because all of the rest of the world’s oceans are well documented throughout history.  Even though the water in the Southern Ocean has been there just as long as the other oceans, it hadn’t been designated as an ocean.  I think another reason that I haven’t heard much about the Southern Ocean is because it doesn’t really have any direct impacts on Americans.  All of our trade routes avoid this area of the world, we don’t have any landclaims within the ocean, and very few Americans have actually gone to Anarctica.  This article also talks about the boundaries and the conflict regarding how far north the boundaries of the ocean would be.  Most members of the IHO supported the boundary being at 60 degrees.  However, 7 countries pushed to have the boundary set at 50 degrees.  The reason most countries supported the 60 degree boundary is because it doesn’t add any land outside of Anarctica to the ocean.  Although this article doesn’t state which countries wanted the boundary at 50 degrees, I am guessing its countries with land very far south, like Argentina, Chile, Australia, and maybe South Africa.  This would allow them control over the Southern Ocean that they can’t get with the current boundaries.  It is interesting that it took until 2002 for the point to be raised that the Southern Ocean is district enough from the other oceans, that it should be considered a separate ocean.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 3, 11:25 AM
(Oceania) Geography experts now claim the waters around Antarctica will join the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic as the fifth ocean. Almost every member of the International Hydrographic Organization declared the existence of the South Ocean, which extends to 60° S latitude and is double the size of the United States. While it might seem trivial, the Southern Ocean has the most powerful water current, a different circulation, and a unique ecosystem, marking it separate from other bodies of water.
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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | Geography | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

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Capital Jerusalem

Capital Jerusalem | Geography | Scoop.it

"Because Israel refused to recognize the U.N. plan for an internationalized Jerusalem and because of its annexation of occupied East Jerusalem in 1967, no country in the world has offered legal and diplomatic recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Most states, however, have unofficially acknowledged Israel's sovereignty and actual possession, without recognition of lawful title."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2017 9:16 AM

That is, until now.  The United States is planning to move it's embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, in a move that will have far more reaching implications than the relocation of just about any other embassy on Earth could have, given the geopolitical significance of Jerusalem to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the broader international ties.  Below are some resources to contextualize this shift: 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does this change the status quo at the local, national and international scales?  What might be some of the consequences of this move?  What would you recommend and why?  

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East, geopolitics, historical.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 7, 9:12 AM
It was a major move by the Trump administration with far reaching complications.  Now it if you take out all of the past history in the area and all of the future political/military problems in the area does it make sense to recognize Jerusalem as the capital, well yes. However, in this world that we live in it surely is not that simple. With the past, current, and future arguments in the area between Israel and the Palestine's this further creates a rift between both and probably takes us further away from a resolution. From a geography and economic perspective Jerusalem would be a great central location in which to work from, however since there is so much contested space there it simply does not work. It isn't always the best place from a geographical standpoint (although in an ideal world that be perfect), but the one in our current political climate that makes the most sense for ones own country. This is a decision that we will have to look back at for the next decade or so and see eventually the impact that it will have on the current situation. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 22, 12:36 PM
The decision by the US to move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognize the city as the capital of Israel totally and absolutely undermines almost any chance at a two state solution. With this declaration, the US has taken sides and the idea that a two state solution with a Jerusalem under international government has essentially vanished. Even if the US were to reverse their decision in the future, the damage has already been done. 
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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Geography | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."


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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 9:01 AM
This comes as a surprise to me. I would think that the cyrillic alphabet was an integral part of their cultural identity. This is further evidence of groups sacrificing their own culture for the sake of globalizing and relating with other countries.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 3:15 PM
This article explains how the country of Kazakhstan will be switching their alphabet, as the title suggests. Originally using the Kazakh alphabet, the president has declared that they will be using the Latin Script. They argue that this will help with Kazakhstan’s “integration into the global educational and economic environment”
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2:18 PM
This showcases how important a countries language is. It allows the country, in this case Kazakhstan, to have their own sort of identity, which can be seen in having extra letters in their alphabet that are certain Kazakh sounds. However, is it also important to be on the same grounds as other countries, many using the latin alphabet, because it makes the economic environment and education situations easier which other countries. 
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Globalization, Trade, and Poverty

What is globalization? Is globalization a good thing or not. Well, I have an answer that may not surprise you: It's complicated. This week, Jacob and Adriene will argue that globalization is, in aggregate, good. Free trade and globalization tend to provide an overall benefit, and raises average incomes across the globe. The downside is that it isn't good for every individual in the system. In some countries, manufacturing jobs move to places where labor costs are lower. And some countries that receive the influx of jobs aren't prepared to deal with it, from a regulatory standpoint.

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Marilyn Ramos Rios's curator insight, November 13, 2017 8:52 AM
Is globalization good thing or not?
Ivan Ius's curator insight, November 13, 2017 11:32 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Pattern and Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perspective;
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:51 AM
Globalization, Trade, and Poverty
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Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged.

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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 13, 8:41 PM
This video is extremely interesting seeing as it points out the differences between two very different worlds that are only separated by a single border. The video shows how racist the Dominicans are to their neighbors and shows us how the Haitians live under such scrutiny. On each end of the border, there are two markets that are supposed to allow both the Haitians and the Dominicans to trade their goods, however, the strict border patrol officers keep the Haitians from entering until their neighbors have set up their shops at the best spots. The director of the video also notes that he believes the reason Haiti is much poorer than the Dominican Republic stems all the way back to when they were colonies of France and Spain. 
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 12:47 PM
I found this video to be very insightful into the relationship Haiti has with the Dominican Republic and how the Haitian government has formed into what it is today. It was especially informative for myself because I didn't know very much about these countries before watching this video. I knew Haiti was the first slave colony to have a successful revolt against their slave holders, but I didn't know or realize all the consequences of that slave uprising. It seems like Haiti wasn't given a proper chance right off the bat to succeed as a nation. The French overworked their land and destroyed the soil which is still a problem today. Once Haiti declared independence, many nations enforced embargoes on Haiti because it was considered a threat due to it being a black republic, which strangled their potential for a strong economy. Adding to that France demanded a large sum of money from Haiti after they declared independence because France was upset about losing profits from the colony, which hindered the Haitian economy even more. It's too bad that Haiti got a bad hand of cards right from the beginning, I hope that one day they can rise above adversity, and truly flourish as a nation.
tyrone perry's curator insight, March 14, 10:43 PM
watching this showed many disturbing facts about the island shared by the D.R. and Haiti.  because of both of their previous owners the island went in two different directions.  Haiti owned by the French brought over many slaves to pillage and exploit their side of the Island.  Haiti could not flourish because of racism and debt.  D.R. had a different history the Spaniards integrated with the locals and worked together to help the country grow.  they took care of their land and their was no racism playing any role in destroying the people of that country.  driving up and down the you can see the difference on both sides.  Haiti has a bare and eroded land while the D.R. has lush jungles.  according to the narrator there is strong racism towards the Haitians by the Dominicans.  Even thou they both share the island the Dominicans look down on the Haitians and refuse to help them even thou D.R. is a so to speak rich nation they could really help improve and grow both nations as a whole.  Its sad to see that the reason people cant grow is because of systemic and blatant racism. 
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The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis

The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis | Geography | Scoop.it
Life has long been fraught for a Muslim minority in mainly Buddhist Myanmar, but the recent “ethnic cleansing” has sent Rohingya fleeing en masse.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2017 3:25 PM

Many students have asked the question "Who are the Rohingya?" The Muslim minority group, concentrated near the Bangladeshi has a long history of marginalization. Its members lack full citizenship in Myanmar (Burma), and many in Myanmar deny that the Rohingya are a native ethnic group, claiming that they are recent Bengali immigrants. Now, fierce clashes between security forces and Rohingya militants left hundreds dead and entire villages torched to the ground. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled over the border into Bangladesh.

 

Tags: migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

M Sullivan's curator insight, September 19, 2017 9:00 PM
Shocking reality of life for people in Myanmar to follow on from reading the novel 'Bamboo People' by Mitali Perkins.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 3:07 AM

Global challenges - Population - including Migration - refugees

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The Edge of the Plates

The Edge of the Plates | Geography | Scoop.it

"Tomales Bay lies about 50 kilometers (30 miles) northwest of San Francisco, along the edges of two tectonic plates that are grinding past each other. The boundary between them is the San Andreas Fault, the famous rift that partitions California for hundreds of miles. To the west of the Bay is the Pacific plate; to the east is the North American plate. The rock on the western shore of the Bay is granite, an igneous rock that formed underground when molten material slowly cooled over time. On the opposite shore, the land is a mix of several types of marine sedimentary rocks. In Assembling California, John McPhee calls that side “a boneyard of exotica,” a mixture of rock of 'such widespread provenance that it is quite literally a collection from the entire Pacific basin, or even half of the surface of the planet.'"

 

Tags: geomorphology, remote sensing, tectonics, geology, California, coastal, physical.


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What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut?

What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut? | Geography | Scoop.it
Conservatives say the state has a tax problem. Liberals say it has an inequality problem. What it really has is a city problem.

 

Connecticut is losing rich companies (and their tax revenues) while it’s adding low-wage workers, like personal-care aides and retail salespeople. Yet it remains a high-tax state. That’s a recipe for a budget crisis.

 

The rise and fall of Connecticut fits into the story of American cities. In the 1970s, American metros were suffering a terrible crime wave, and New York was dropping dead. That meant boom times for New York’s suburbs and southwestern Connecticut. But now many of those companies are moving back, lured by newly lower-crime cities and the hip urban neighborhoods where the most educated young workers increasingly want to live.

 

Finally, the hottest trend in American migration today is south, west, and cheap—that is, far away from Connecticut, both geographically and economically. Texas is growing rapidly, and seven of the 10 fastest-growing large metropolitan areas in 2016 were in the Carolinas and Florida. Of the 20 fastest-growing metros, none are in the northeast.

 

Tags: urban, regions, economic.


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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 2017 4:58 PM
Unit 4 - Local Politics, Unit 6 - Economic Development, Unit 7 - Urban 
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Geography Right Here. Right Now.

Amazing facts for a Geography of the 21st Century. See www.geography.org.uk See www.pupilvision.com


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 3, 2013 9:26 PM
What is Geography? Why teach Geography?
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AP Central - Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

AP Central - Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Geography | Scoop.it

The Nature of Geography
Most everyone knows that history is the study of events through time. Basically, historians ask "What happened when and why then?" But many people, it seems, have a problem defining geography. One reason why geography has languished in the curricula ...


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:08 AM

Some very interesting definitions about 'Geography' and 'Why Geography?' in this article..." all geographic teaching and learning should relate to the human need to know, emphasizing "Why care?" The definition presented here identifies in simple, easily taught, and easily learned terms the extreme complexity of geography.

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Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Geography | Scoop.it
One reason why geography has languished in the curricula of many American schools is that so few people understand the nature of the discipline or its relevance to our everyday lives. What is geography? What is its unique perspective? What do geographers do? Why is geography important? Why should we teach (and learn) geography in the schools? These are questions that have gone largely unanswered in American education. This brief essay presents an easily taught, understood, and remembered definition of geography.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, August 7, 2015 10:55 AM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 5:29 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 8, 2015 12:14 AM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.


Tagseducation, K12geography education.

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12 Maps That Changed the World

12 Maps That Changed the World | Geography | Scoop.it
Is there such a thing as a perfect map?

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