Geography 400
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Geography 400
Justin Roscoe
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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

Justin Roscoe- I find it interesting that in the U.S. we have been raised to accept all ethnicities and religion. Even though this is a belief shared by most americans and the government there are still those who are racist. It shocks me that in an area where most of these religions and ethnicities originate from cannot be accepting of one another. It surprises me that how that in the past France had its colony in Algeria and the white French people were able to coexist but in the home country they (the government included) cannot be accepting/coexist with others. This just seems too old fashioned and childish in ways. 


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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war.

 

Justin Roscoe-It’s interesting to see this movement of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants entering into a country that is geographically so close but yet so culturally different especially in this day and age where globalization brings cultures closer together. This is most likely due to relatively poor economies in many of the Central American countries where global communication isn’t easily accessible to the general public. As the article states many of these immigrants are entering the country not having to learn the local language but in many cases forcing the local to learn their language. Service jobs are being given to those who are predominantly Spanish speaking to appeal to the growing Spanish speaking population. It is difficult to think of a nation so willing to adapt to the immigrants rather than having a sense of what Americans would call patriotism and attempt to preserve its current culture and make the new comers adapt. In Belize this more acceptable especially given there history where there country has “long been a country of immigrants.” It seems as though the people of this country have it in their blood to adapt and welcome the immigrants from Guatemala and El Salvador. This is not to say the spike in population does not come with its faults. In the article they discuss the migrants offering to work for less than that of what many of the current citizens work for. Which has increased the unemployment have almost a quarter of Belizeans saying they are currently unemployed. As this immigration movement continues it will be interesting to see what the future holds as far as whether the national language will stay English or be change and how the country’s culture, which is always changing, will adapt to the immigration.


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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, January 22, 10:57 AM

First off it was surprising to read that Belize was a mainly English speaking country (until recently), I guess sometimes we just assume certain countries speak a certain language because of location. However, as the article explains the growing immigration rate of Spanish speakers (a country that always had a lot of immigrates) has changed a lot of the culture in the country. It has also led to a boom in population in the cites and has kept the country competitive in markets in which it trades in. As seen in the United States recently, politics always gets involved with newcomers, with the big question can you win the new groups vote? If you can't then how can we make sure these people are unable to vote. In Belize so far there has no been a big blow back on immigration and most of the politician have been helpful with citizenship.  It will be interesting to monitor this into the next election cycle for the country .

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 7, 11:28 AM
Immigration in Belize is booming, there are immigrants coming from all over Central America, primarily from Guatemala though. Belize has English as its primary language but many of these immigrants are Spanish speaking, and speaking English is no longer necessary to obtain citizenship, schools are now teaching Spanish and many natives are losing jobs to immigrants due to them not speaking Spanish. Immigration is helping politicians, many of whom are making the process to become citizens easier. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 8:38 PM
Belize provides us with another good example of how political boundaries are not clear divisions of ethnicity or culture, and another good example of how countries in close proximity to each other are sometimes set on different paths by their different colonial histories.  Belize, a country previously colonized by the British, is much better off than Guatemala and other countries in the region.  For this reason, many people are migrating into Belize from nearby countries that were once Spanish possessions, causing a blending of ethnicities and cultures across borders.