Geography 200
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article gives a good description of how volcanic islands grow and then die.  It has beautiful pictures of these types of islands.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:30 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, pretty cool story on the formation of islands in the south Pacific. A couple of them look like the island visible from the beach in Rincon, Puerto Rico where I stayed. The island is one giant rock so nobody lives there and it's a naval base for the U.S. military. This, however, is a different situation when you realize that not only do people live here, but kind of a lot of people live here.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:00 PM

What causes the death and the caldera in a volcano? One thing that happens in a deceased volcano is the center of the volcano starts to either erode or the inside finally caves in. Once this happen a caldera takes shape and the ocean starts to take over. As the waves eat away at the shores it will eventually create a island that is shaped like a "U". After this happens that island will someday retreat back into the ocean and someday form a barrier reef.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:52 PM

Based on general knowledge, I know that the taller a volcano is, the younger it is and the shorter it is, the older it is. The reason they start to get short is from erosion. Hot spots in the Earth's crust make small islands from molten rock. Young islands can be very dangerous, because if they are inhabited, they have the possibility of erupting, whereas an old island does not since the volcano is lnactice and eroding. Over time the inactive volcano will crumble and a caldera will take shape and after even more time, that caldera will slip under the ocean and become a reef. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Emissions of gas and ash indicate an increase in activity at Costa Rica’s Turrialba volcano in January 2010.

 

A new vent opened this month on Turriabla, the easternmost of Costa Rica's active volacanoes.  This false-color, near-infrared satellite image would be an effective teaching tool to discuss the importantce of geospatial technologies to monitor the Earth's surface. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article reminds us of how fragile the earth’s crust can be.  The rock can be ‘rotten’ when it is cooled prematurely due to rain, causing it to fracture more easily.

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Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 25, 2013 8:55 PM

its crazy how something so dangerous can be so pretty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:56 PM

Using different teaching methods and technologies is a part of every day life. Figuring out new ways to teach students about observing and identifying whats happening in a photo is highly important. This geospatial photograph can be used in many ways. It can be used to note color differences, and realize that this volcano has emissions that can be seen in the picture erupting from it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:50 PM

(Central America topic 9)

Having a volcano that looms behind your city suddenly come back to life is about as much of a wakeup call as anybody would want. Though in this case it was determined that a major eruption was not immanent, it raises the question as to weighing the risks of living in such areas.  However, to me it seems that living at the base of Turriabla is not much more risky than living in other regions. Costa Ricans may have to deal with volcanoes, but so do those living around Mt. St. Helens, islands in the Pacific Ring of Fire, and even around Yellowstone. Aside from volcanoes, other environmental risks (floods, droughts, extreme temperatures, hurricanes, blizzards, landslides, tornadoes, wildfires, etc.) are other things just as worthy of being revered. So if you're safe from volcanoes, it's still likely you're more at risk from another form of nature's wrath.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."



Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The Philippines which experiences monsoon weather is imperiled by the deforestation and clogged water ways due to increased population.  This country must do something to fix these issues or more large scale floods will likely be in its future.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.