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Resources & Ideas for Human Geography
Curated by Deanna Metz
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Interactive map: Number of U.S. cities criminalizing homelessness surges

Interactive map: Number of U.S. cities criminalizing homelessness surges | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
Across the country, advocates say the number of cities with municipal bans on camping or sleeping outside has increased 50 percent since 2011. Here is an interactive map showing which cities have implemented the bans.
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The ‘Tryst With Destiny’ Speech That Divided India and Pakistan

The ‘Tryst With Destiny’ Speech That Divided India and Pakistan | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
How Mohandas Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru and Muhammad Ali Jinnah were involved with Aug. 15, 1947, when power ove
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A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You

A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
A new study reveals the full extent of globalization in our food supply. More than two-thirds of the crops that underpin national diets originally came from somewhere else — often far away.
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Homemaker's war guide.

Homemaker's war guide. | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
Chart with columns providing illustrated suggestions for supporting the war effort. Colors used are red, blue, black/gray and white. Topics include conserving, storing, and reusing food, textiles, rubber, and metals, and instructions for taking protective measures in case of attack, and for participating in wartime community organizations. Centered at top of the poster is a graphic image representing women in various work and military uniforms, standing with airplanes, ambulances, a car, and a tank. The "homemaker" is highlighted at center and is represented wearing an apron, holding a saucepan, standing inside a red house.
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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Metz's insight:

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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Max Minard's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:04 PM

This map shows the average age for every country based on its own individual population. It even provides the oldest and youngest countries with Niger being the youngest country on average and Germany and Japan tied for the oldest country on average. certain patterns can be seen on the map such as the green areas (teens as median age) being mainly centered is almost all of Africa. The other areas are in the twenties. Based on this information, one can safely assume that the average global ages correlates with the relative development of each country and it s success in domestic health care. Having this allows for their population to have a larger life expectancy and therefore a higher average age based on its overall population. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

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How the Global Population Boom Really Began

How the Global Population Boom Really Began | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
The Industrial Revolution gets credit for kicking off the world's human population explosion, but new research suggests we should look further back.


“If you dig further in the past," Stutz told Emory University, "the data suggest that a critical threshold of political and economic organization set the stage around the start of the Common Era. The resulting political-economic balance was the tipping point for economies of scale: It created a range of opportunities enabling more people to get resources, form successful families, and generate enough capital to transfer to the next generation.”


Tag: population.


Via Seth Dixon
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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 3, 2015 7:29 PM

Homo Sapiens evolved around 130,000 to 160,000 ago, so why did it take until 1804 to reach 1 billion and only 195 years to reach 6 billion? The Industrial Revolution is usually agreed upon as the major catalyst for this population boom. However, WHY is the Industrial Revolution given credit for the population boom and  what else could have caused this? Population growth began with cities which in this case refers to any sort of settlement. Food surplus allows for people to do other things than hunt and gather. This allowed  for the creation of population centers, society, hegemonic class systems, and the economy.  As long as their was a food surplus there could be a population surplus. So the better people were at getting/making food, the more the population grew. So the population boom could actually be attributed to the ability to create a food surplus. The agriculture revolution spured this allowing for the domestication of farm animals and primitive  farming equipment. The population to continue to grow. The industrial revolution made these technologies many times better. This allowed for a greater food surplus resulting in a stronger economy  and standard of living which ALL results in ... A FASTER GROWING POPULATION.

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Stats that reshape your world-view

With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, statistics guru Hans Rosling uses an amazing new presentation tool, Gapminder, to present data that debunks several myths about world development. Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden's Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a nonprofit that brings vital global data to life.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Metz's insight:

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2015 3:01 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

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The 11 American nations, in one map

The 11 American nations, in one map | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

Red states and blue states? Flyover country and the coasts? How simplistic. Colin Woodard, a reporter at the Portland Press Herald and author of several books, says North America can be broken neatly into 11 separate nation-states, where dominant cultures explain our voting behaviors and attitudes toward everything from social issues to the role of government.

“The borders of my eleven American nations are reflected in many different types of maps — including maps showing the distribution of linguistic dialects, the spread of cultural artifacts, the prevalence of different religious denominations, and the county-by-county breakdown of voting in virtually every hotly contested presidential race in our history,” Woodard writes in the Fall 2013 issue of Tufts University’s alumni magazine. “Our continent’s famed mobility has been reinforcing, not dissolving, regional differences, as people increasingly sort themselves into like-minded communities.”

Take a look at his map.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:54 PM

The first thing I noticed about this map, and really liked, was that the nations extend past the borders of the United States. That allows these nations to reflect the similarities shared among large regions. These cultural, economic, and political regions reflect something that extends beyond the political borders of any one country. Southern Arizona is very similar to Mexico just like Northern Idaho is similar to Canada. The region labeled the Far West lumps together many different areas, likely because of the similar geography. However, there is more diversity in these areas than the map shows, for example there is a fairly big difference between the culture and political beliefs of Nevada and Utah, and western New Mexico is very different from Montana.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:31 PM

The way this map has been broken up is rather accurate. With the Greater Appalachia, stretching through West Virginia and into northwest Texas. Also, El Norte being separated due to the linguistic differences that have always been around that area.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 6:47 PM

This article was very interesting because it gave you a different way to look at not only the Unites States but the North American continent as well. I never realized that this continent can be broken into 11 separate nation-states. These 11 different divisions all represent and explain the different cultures or view points of the people living in them. The divisions can be a result anywhere from voting choices, social issues, religious beliefs, or just that particular type of community. I live in the Yankeedom. Northeastern states value education and are more comfortable with government regulation versus other areas. I was unaware that within the El Norte region, southwest Texas and the border region is the oldest and most different in America. Areas where independence was valued more had higher levels of violent deaths rather than the areas that had more government interventions.

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The two Mexicos

The two Mexicos | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

"With its combination of modernity and poverty, Mexico provides lessons for all emerging markets."


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Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 22, 2015 12:04 AM

Mexico is a country enriched with tons of history and culture that it becomes interesting knowing that the country once had a chance to be very prosperous. Mexico was a huge dependent on oil. The country still struggles with poverty and a balanced system. I believe the biggest asset to the poverty is the informal economy that Mexico runs on. The citizens of the country sell for themselves, not having to pay nothing to the government. These Mexicans are very proud of there entreprenurial culture. 

Towards a recent travel to my mother's country, Guatemala, after reading this article, Guatemala is a country with similar features. A lot of people are on the streets with there own businesses to run. The huge problem in this case is that the citizens do not trust the government. Guatemala has struggled with its government due to years and years of corruption. This gives Mexican's a reason to not believe in the system. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Mexico is nation with many economic advantages. The problem is the nation has yet to formalize its economic system. An economy based around peddling and privateers can not compete with the economy's of the industrialized world. In order to bridge the gap between modernity and poverty, Mexico must impalement  regulations and laws that are designed to formalize the nations economy. Though in its current state, the Mexican government does not have the trust of the people. Governments often exist on trust. People institute a government for the safety of their property and themselves. What good is a government that can not provide basic protection to its citizens? The government must establish a sense of trust and safety within Mexico.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:05 PM

Many of the "lessons" highlighted in this article apply to all countries. As i was reading this i was thinking about the many  inequalities in America. We like to pride ourselves as the "Greates Country in the World", after all we are the richest country. Just like Mexico though, we too have two faces. I think we may just be better at hiding the one that is uglier.

"The number of people living in high-poverty areas—defined as census tracts where 40 percent or more of families have income levels below the federal poverty threshold—nearly doubled between 2000 and 2013, to 13.8 million from 7.2 million, according to a new analysis of census data by Paul Jargowsky, a public-policy professor at Rutgers University-Camden and a fellow at The Century Foundation. That’s the highest number of Americans living in high-poverty neighborhoods ever recorded."http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/08/more-americans-are-living-in-slums/400832/

We too have slums and they are growing. We may be called to "welfare state" but people don't understand the stipulations of our current welfare programs. The cash assistance program only allows people to utilize it for a maximum of two years over a life time. Also, the amount they receive keeps them a poverty levels.We love to focus on our booming economies, our white picket fences, and the neighbor hoods whove been reformed by gentrification, but we have millions suffering in poor living conditions with high crime rates.The author of this article wirtes "Mexico has failed to bridge the gap between a globalized minority and a majority that lives in what the prsident admits is backwardness and poverty" We have too.

 

The third lesson is to bring the informal economy into light, well i think we could benefit from doing that too. America's has a huge informal sex trafficking, drug selling, illegal immigrant hiring economy. http://monthlyreview.org/2006/07/01/harder-times-undocumented-workers-and-the-u-s-informal-economy/

 

and in regards to how "Violent drug related crime" Here in America we do rate number one in one thing... gun massacres..Go US!! http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/27/health/u-s-most-mass-shootings/

 

I don't have the solutions to any of these issues but what i can say is that Mexico is not alone!

 

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Practicing an Open Mind

Practicing an Open Mind | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”

 

Tags: place, tourism, geo-inspiration.


Via Seth Dixon
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Greg Hill's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:06 PM
I love to travel for it challenges what I already know or "think" I know.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:16 AM

Travel

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional). Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."


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jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:44 AM

This was the game we played in class!!!

I really enjoyed this game and highly recommend it to future APHUG students because it was fun, informative, and FUN. It really helped me understand how England got really crowded all of the sudden due to the Industrial Revolution. It was a sudden urban sprawl with no  urban planning. My map/ city was a complete mess! 

I hope this game continues to be played as it is a fun introduction to the chaos of the Industrial Revolution. 

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:57 PM

We played this game in our APHUG class. It really simulated how urban development exploded in the industrial revolution. It gives an explanation as to why urban planners at the time had poor design choices because they had little time to plan. They also didn't account for future population growth or new developments in technology. It really shows why today's older cities have poorer designs and more traffic. 

 

This article relates to the Industrial Revolution. It shows the population explosions which occurred as a result and the increased technology during the time. All of these factors of the industrial revolution in England contributed to the quick and poorly designed English cities which led to population overflow. These city planners could not have predicted what would happen or how to plan for more people. They also limited time, money, and resources, as the population just continued to grow and grow. 

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Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart

Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
The story of more than a decade of war, terror and revolution in the Middle East, seen through the eyes of six people whose lives were changed forever.
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6 Videos That Help Students Understand World War II

6 Videos That Help Students Understand World War II | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
For history teachers, videos can be a powerful tool to contextualize events that seem intangible, or too far distant in the past. When it comes to World War II,
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Spectacular Video Putting WWII Deaths in Perspective - Wait But Why

Spectacular Video Putting WWII Deaths in Perspective - Wait But Why | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
Spectacular video putting WWII deaths in perspective.
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Metz's insight:

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Damon Recagno's curator insight, October 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Here is a quick introduction to the shifting population demographics and why there is a Declining Natural Growth Rate.

 

This video is a good way of introducing the topic of Cities and Countries Methods for Tackling a Declining Natural Growth Rate because it provides insight on why many locations around the world are currently experiencing a declining natural growth rate.

Teresa Morante Arona's comment, October 13, 2017 9:35 PM
Gret Video, but why do you think there is such a diverse shift in population demographics?
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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Metz's insight:

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.

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Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 11:31 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION
This article depicts various population pyramids in developing, as well as developed countries. These pyramids show trends from the past, as well as predictions for the future (2050). With population pyramids, it is easy to understand how populations shift, as well as observe different trends on populations. I really like studying the information given to us by population pyramids, so this article is very important to me. This whole thing relates to historical trends and projections for the future. 

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:30 PM

This is an example on the population growth and development from the recent years of technological innovation.

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Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what?

Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what? | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
We seem bound to learn the hard way that there really is a limit to how many people the Earth can support.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Metz's insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  


Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 


Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2016 1:42 PM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  


Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 


Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 2016 8:23 AM

Well stated!

From Seth Dixon - His insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 2016 9:23 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

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The Idea of Race

You may know exactly what race you are, but how would you prove it if somebody disagreed with you? Jenée Desmond Harris explains. And for more on how race is a social construct:
http://www.vox.com/2014/10/10/6943461...

 

Tags: culture, race.


Via Seth Dixon
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 27, 2015 9:10 AM

Thomas Masaryk, político y humanista checo, llegó a Estados Unidos y se encontró con el cuestionario que preguntaba entre otras cosas a qué raza pertenecía el inmigrante. Tras pensarlo un rato, escribió: La Humana.

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:23 PM

I am always trying to explain to my students that race is a social construct-hopefully this video will help them to understand this concept.

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Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries

Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
They've been on the cutting edge of the English language since at least the 1500s

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Woodstock School's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:22 AM

Do we speak their language?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:03 PM

unit 3

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:37 PM

I find the social aspect of this absolutely fascinating; gender may be entirely a cultural construct, but we can see its influences in every aspect of human life. Women are responsible for 90 percent of linguistic changes that occur over the course of our lifetimes- because men resist such changes due to their (mostly) feminine origins. A good, witty read for those interested.

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"Why don't we just bomb them?"

"Why don't we just bomb them?" | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it

"The west’s failure has already fueled Syria’s dirty war. Now it needs to address how we got here, the endgame, the legality and the global implications before it asks for permission to shoot."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2015 5:11 PM

I think we've all heard someone say something along the lines of "why doesn't someone just take them out/bomb them?" about ISIS or Syria's leader, Bashar al-Assad.  As is often the case, it's not that simple to remove a thorn as actions can have reverberating consequences.  Here are three articles to consider when discussing the merits/feasibility of military intervention in Syria:


TagsSyria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:20 PM

Every time I hear this mentioned, whether right or wrong, I instantly assume that I know something about their education level. This situation is going from worse to even worse, and the involvement of the world's "leaders" isn't going to help at all. This is an internal problem that needs to fixed internally. Any involvement will just lead to more pointless deaths of American soldiers. It is time for the Arab nations to get together and take out their own garbage. After all, idea's are bulletproof.

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A Graphic Guide to Cemetery Symbolism

A Graphic Guide to Cemetery Symbolism | GEOCLASS | Scoop.it
To convey the lives of the people buried beneath them, and the expectations for what comes after death, symbolism has long been part of tombstones. Below is our guide to some of the most prevalent cemetery symbols. Take it along on your next wander through the necropolis!

 

Tag: cemetery, monuments, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
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asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:44 AM

#cemetery #symbols might alleviate #pain of #families...#Ankaradayız

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 10:04 AM

unit 3...I also shared a bit of this during unit 2 when we looked at CDR

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, December 25, 2015 11:01 AM

When you explain the symbolism, graveyards don't seem as spooky.  :)