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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:42 PM

This is a perfect application of how Von Thunen model still applies today. Von Thunen mapped how crops were distributed around cites. The crops near the city were labor intensive while the crops farther away from the city were labor extensive. Von Thunen's model is often disputed today in a world with such fast transportation, but this study shows that it still applies today. Unit 5 Agriculture

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:34 PM

This research explores the concept of urban agriculture and the water supply needed and used. It came up with surprising results that state that 80% of urban agriculture is in the developing world and 40% of urban agriculture is in or near cities.  

 

The research also covered water supply, stating that most of urban agriculture relies on irrigation. This is especially true in South Asia, and since the water resources are already scarce, the farmers have to compete for water with the government.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:55 PM

Summary: This article is mostly about how much of our agriculture is grown within 20 miles of a city. It turns out 40% of agriculture is grown in this proximity of a city, and this mostly occurs with irrigated agriculture in South Asia. Most of these urban farms are in the developing world as well. 

 

Insight: This article relates to the von Thunen model because it directly talks about the rings that occur around a city, although it is a skewed version of it. I think this is also a good example of how cities have changed since the developing of the von Thunen model, showing that developed countries are supporting the idea of urban agriculture. 

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The World in 2015: Global population and the changing shape of world demographics - YouTube

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.

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Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

Damon Recagno's curator insight, October 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Here is a quick introduction to the shifting population demographics and why there is a Declining Natural Growth Rate.

 

This video is a good way of introducing the topic of Cities and Countries Methods for Tackling a Declining Natural Growth Rate because it provides insight on why many locations around the world are currently experiencing a declining natural growth rate.

Teresa Morante Arona's comment, October 13, 2017 9:35 PM
Gret Video, but why do you think there is such a diverse shift in population demographics?
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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Big Think

What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 5:00 PM

I found this particularly interesting to read about, as alternative histories fascinate me. The "what if" questions that historians always ask themselves are fun to examine and illustrate, as they are shown in the alternative map of Africa. It's interesting to see just how different this map- drawn from historical accounts of ethnic and linguistic differences between the various African societies- is from the map of Africa we now have today. European colonizers drew borders without any consideration for the native populace, and that is today reflected in the rigid borders of African states that do not match historical ethnic boundaries. The concept of a Europe unable to recover from the Black Death would have serious repercussions for world history. It would allow for the progression of African economies and polities unmolested by European influences and the slave trade, completely reshaping the course of the continent's history. The increased influence of the Arab world would also be a plausible consequence of the decimation of Europe's population. This is an interesting concept, and it is very informative in the sense that it forces us to consider a multitude of factors that played a role in shaping the world as we see and live it today.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:04 AM

Alternative history is always fun. There is no question that Africa would be a different place today, if Europeans had never step foot on the shores of this great continent. Would the great African empires still be alive today? Would Africa be the dominant continent in world affairs? The history of civilization over the past 500 years would almost certainly be radically different. Instead of a Eurocentric world, we may have had an Afrocentric world. What this map really underscores, is the effect that colonialism had on Africa. The Africa we know today is a consequence of that era of European domination. While alternate history is fun, we must always remember the actual history that has occurred in Africa.

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Central Mexico Disease Geography (ca. 1880)

Central Mexico Disease Geography (ca. 1880) | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
NOTICE!!   A Survey has been developed to document and compare GIS utilization in the workplace.  This survey assesses GIS availability and utilization in both academic and non-academic work settin...

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Brian Altonen's curator insight, November 18, 2014 9:15 PM

This above map is found on p. 91 of THE EARTH AND ITS INHABITANTS NORTH AMERICA, Vol. 2, by the famous French Geographer Élisée Reclus (1830-1905).  

 

From 1875 to 1894 Reclus published one of the best known series on global populations, a 19 volumes series on "Universal Geography" entitled La Nouvelle Géographie universelle, la terre et les hommes.


This version of the map however comes from another book by Reclus (probably in Universal Geography as well)--THE EARTH and ITS INHABITANTS.  NORTH AMERICA (New York by D Appleton & Co., 1891).  


According to a population density map contained in this volume (Fig. 71, p. 171, The Density of the Population in Mexico"), the densest population at the time was the darker (cooler) region where anemia, pneumonia, and typhus are mentioned, just north and northwest of the label "MEXICO."   


I produced a fairly complete explanation of this map years ago, accessible at my personal blog site (http://brianaltonenmph.com/gis/historical-disease-maps/centralmexico/ ;).  


The popularity of this map suggests my site is heavily visited by US students and professionals interested in Mexican/Hispanic culture and how this impacts local medical geography, our current health care needs, the history of health related needs amongst Hispanics and their communities.  


The popularity of this page also sends an interesting message to the medical profession.  


It popularity may also be because members of the Hispanic communities in the United States have a growing interest in their own heritage, or because non-Hispanic people want to learn more, or because meeting the needs of the Hispanic patient is perhaps one of the most important cultural health issues to date in the US healthcare system.   


Whatever the reason, we also know that the history and geography of Mexico and Central America are popular topics for classes taught in schools and colleges across this country.  One of the least discussed parts of this aspect of American history (all 3 or more Americas) is the long term impact of a rapidly growing Hispanic culture on the United States healthcare system.    


Like the American Indian public health dilemma, there are a bunch of popular impressions taught about Europeans, Hispanics and the Indigenous that are not completely true.  


These two cultures had impact on each other, in such a way that this topic cannot be taught effectively in any single college level program, except as a discipline.  


In terms of medical history, the history of New Spain health is more than just a story of how Europeans wiped out so  indigenous groups through the communication of small pox and measles.  There is also the tale of how certain venereal diseases were brought back to Europe by sailors venturing deep into the woods of the New World, a New World blessing for the social elite back home.   (Diseases do travel both ways, from culture to culture.)  


Reclus covers but a small part of this history, mostly superficially, but most importantly, with a focus on Native Mexican-American Hispanic cultural diseases, not on the other diseases that strike this area due to in-migrating African-Americans for nearly two centuries.  


Small pox and measles prevail where large numbers of indigenous people reside.  Most of the fevers are close to the shorelines, a product of local vectors and ships bearing the contagion in the form of mosquitoes from Jamaica, Cuba, afar.  Poor nutrition due to foodways are prevalent in those regions where Goiter is noted.  Geophagy (Clay-eaters) is a unique culturally-linked, or culturally-bound behavior (in Jamaica as well).  Pintos Malady (today, Pinta), is an ecologically-defined variety of falciparum diseases, characterized by large dark patches and skin mottling.


Most important to note here is the need for a more extensive program devoted to a more comprehensive approach to monitoring cultural health within the US healthcare system.  Medicine is not just the practice of health care using solely western philosophy and health paradigms.  The basic Western European motif for defining the healthcare is not always clinically perfect for these other cultural groups.


With a rise in the size of the Hispanic population in the U.S. (see the 2020 census predictions), and a matching rise in African/African-American, Caribbean, Asian, Indigenous, Muslim, and other cultural healthcare demands, ad infinitum, the "traditional medicine" everyone is currently encouraged to practice will have to be supplemented by programs devoted to understanding the culturally-bound syndromes (geophagy, the Mexican interpretation of seizures), culturally-linked diagnoses (pinta, chiclero's ear)  and the ongoing culturally-related risks for the most common maladies (i.e. asthma, diabetes, certain heart diseases, blood dyscrasias, through genetics, foodways, etc.)


I review culturally-bound, linked and related diagnoses and disease states at a number of places (start with http://brianaltonenmph.com/gis/populations-and-managed-care/disease-patterns-linked-to-culturally-defined-health-regions/ ;).  My coverage focuses on how to improve a healthcare program by defining how to improve upon its cultural knowledgebase,  awareness and sensitivity, and develop a more efficient, culturally targeted interventions program.


[For more on Reclus, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89lis%C3%A9e_Reclus; the book with this map is at http://books.google.com/books?id=dxj3Qr2RIWYC )  


 





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OK, Haters, It's Time To Admit It: The World Is Becoming A Better Place

OK, Haters, It's Time To Admit It: The World Is Becoming A Better Place | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
People love to complain about how horrible...

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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
All are literary in voice and spirit; all will let you understand a place in a profound way. And none of them are Gone with the Wind.

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:03 AM

This looks neat! How many of these books have you read?

 

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The Science of Earthquakes by Weather Underground

The Science of Earthquakes by Weather Underground | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 2015 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

Jason Nemecek's curator insight, March 2, 2016 2:00 PM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)

 

GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger

A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Corn is not what you think. For starters: Most of the time, it's not human food.

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Nolan Walters's curator insight, October 25, 2014 11:29 AM

Most of the corn is not even going to us. Most of it goes to the animals, who eat it (which is cheaper than grass), which fatten them up for slaughter for humans.  Corn also gets turned into Corn Syrup, which fattens us.  The Corn industry is mostly to fatten up animals for meat for us humans in MDCs. 

Alex Lewis's curator insight, October 30, 2014 12:46 PM

The fact that we could use this land to grow surplus edible food instead of corn that isn't edible and goes to feed obese and unhealthy cows is sickening. There are millions of people dying in Africa and other LDC's from starvation, but we use our farmland to grow inedible corn and overfeed cows to the point of death. The corn is used to feed animals, and the animals are then slaughtered months, weeks or even days before they would've died of overfeeding. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:42 PM

Land use practices that determine what is grown in a particular place are partly determined by the health needs of a local population, but they are more directly shaped by economic markets.  Over 75% of the corn produced in the United States is destined for animal feed or fuel; since global population projections are now supposed to be 11 billion by 2100, these are some important issues for us to consider before we are forced to reassess our societal choices.    

 

Tagspodcast, political ecology, agriculture, food production, land use.

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It's Columbus Day. Let's talk about geography (and Ebola). - Washington Post (blog)

It's Columbus Day. Let's talk about geography (and Ebola). - Washington Post (blog) | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.
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The Divided City

The Divided City | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Just as they've started to revitalize—attracting industry, investment and people—our cities are threatened by new and more vexing divides. (RT @petesaunders3: @richard_florida has a new urban geography model.
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Joe Huston sur Twitter : "@geography_411 Tornadoes sometimes form along the leading edge of a squall line,hitting whatever is in front of them http://t.co/PFauMS1Vi6"

Joe Huston sur Twitter : "@geography_411 Tornadoes sometimes form along the leading edge of a squall line,hitting whatever is in front of them http://t.co/PFauMS1Vi6" | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
@geography_411 Tornadoes sometimes form along the leading edge of a squall line,hitting whatever is in front of them http://t.co/PFauMS1Vi6
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The U.S. Cities With The Most Bike Commuters (It's Still Not A Lot)

The U.S. Cities With The Most Bike Commuters (It's Still Not A Lot) | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Biking is seeing a huge surge in popularity, but how big a surge is it? Even in these biking cities, not that many people are riding to work every day. (RT @Richard_Florida: U.S.
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4 maps that debunk National Geographic, and why they need to issue another correction

4 maps that debunk National Geographic, and why they need to issue another correction | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
National Geographic recently published a map on their online publication showing Ukraine not only divided along what it portrayed as very obvious and cutting divisions, but also giving topographical legitimacy to the Russian colonial term...
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In Myanmar, China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Myanmar, China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 1:16 PM

While reading this article I found it quite shocking to see that Myanmar is scrambling for energy, such as selling oil, this money is used in lanterns as a cheaper alternative to kerosene. People will do anything just to receive money and use it to help out their families. Money is not something easily  accessible and neither is energy.Yet, even though Myanmar is struggling right now, places such as Beijing still see Myanmar and Ramree Island as the main way to have safe and fast trade. 

The article also states that there are promising signs to China, and Southeast Asia to come back into the picture such as they are likely to have development that will focus on manufacturing in textiles and construction materials to help the country to gain power and energy back. 

The photographs in this article give for a good example of how China is striving for energy such as the women holding up the teapot that is considered to be a lamp with the use of oil. People in China are working hard and using different resources to serve as energy. Shouldn't people even out of China use up what they have and not be wasteful? 

Places in Southeast Asia can think of ways to gain energy, power and comfort because their whole motto on life is different than that of the United States of America.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:05 PM

this is where china grows at the expense of others. How are these people going to fight back? China is forced to do this because it wants to be the strongest nation in the world and as long as they are importing oil it relies on someone that can cut them off. And as long as they now are allowing the birth of two children the population growth in china is forcing china to expand and will do whatever means necessary to do so.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:28 AM

An interesting article that highlights important geographic disparities. The problem for Burma is that it has lagged behind in the world from its isolation. As a result when globalization such as the proposed trade zone in the article come about there is disastrous consequences. Unlike the west they are catching up and didn't have an adjusting period. Furthermore in China's race to keep its economy superior and out due America they have been going on wild spending sprees such as this deal to give them a global edge. Unfortunately this will leave many of the poor in Burma worse off than before. Plus their government will not likely help them because of their oppressive nature. Maybe all of this will create of revolution to give the Burmese freedom so that they can make these decisions for themselves as they enter the global community(also so they are not exploited as companies everywhere will likely be looking at its cheap labor and resources).

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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:59 PM

This shows how different cultures have adapted to harsh environments 

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Visited States Map - Create a Map of all the places you've been

Visited States Map - Create a Map of all the places you've been | GEO 160 | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."


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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 19, 2014 9:45 PM

really cool site!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:28 AM

I haven't been to a lot of United States. I have been to Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina. As we can see, I pretty much know New England pretty well. I would however, like to travel throughout the west side of the United States.

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The Geography of Terrorism - The Atlantic

The Geography of Terrorism - The Atlantic | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
More than 80 percent of last year's terrorism fatalities occurred in just five countries.
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For GOP and Dems, elections are a geography lesson - SunHerald.com

Read local community news, articles, opinions, and stories from South Mississippi, Harrison, Jackson, Hancock, Stone, George, and Pearl River and bay st.
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Here Is Every U.S. County's Favorite Football Team (According to Facebook)

Here Is Every U.S. County's Favorite Football Team (According to Facebook) | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
The Patriots really do rule New England, and the Cowboys might just be America's team. But after that, things get complicated.
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Minnetonka's last family farm to become housing development

Minnetonka's last family farm to become housing development | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
For more than 50 years, the Jondahl family raised horses, sheep and chickens, grew corn, beans and berries on their farm in Minnetonka — all the while watching as Hwy

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Nordic Lights : Image of the Day

Nordic Lights : Image of the Day | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden have some of the world’s highest rates of electricity consumption per person.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:17 PM

This articles discusses which countries use the most electricity and believe it or not, the Nordic countries are at the top of the list. It shows two satellite images in the nighttime for you to get a better visual as to which areas of these countries use the most electricity. There are multiple factors that go into these countries consuming this much energy. One factor that is interesting is the high demand for electricity because of the long winters in these countries. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 9:34 AM

These images are really interesting and expose just how much electricity the Scandinavian countries actually use. It is surprising to think of these nations as large energy consumers because of their general reputation as progressive, clean, and liberal places. This brief article is an excellent example of how maps and satellite images can be misleading, though. As opposed to places like the U.S. or China, energy consumption in the Scandinavian countries actually produces only small amounts of greenhouse gases and is based on renewable energy sources. 

 

This shows an interesting and not immediately apparent geographic distinction between the Scandinavian countries and places such as China and the U.S. Chinese and United States energy consumption is enormous because of those countries' ability and desire to produce large amounts of goods quickly. Household energy use is also high because of the widespread use of electronics such as televisions, computers, and appliances. The Scandinavian countries, on the other hand, have a need for increased energy use because of their geographic location: long, dark winters mean an increased need for electricity and for longer periods. Also, Scandinavia is able to produce energy at lower costs due to its use of renewable energy sources. So though those countries may consume much more energy than their non-Scandinavian counterparts, they are doing so responsibly and for a reason. 

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 22, 11:41 AM
This map of Scandinavian energy usage holds a lot of insight to what this region of the world is like.  Shockingly, Scandinavians all use more electricity per person per hour than the U.S.  The people in Iceland use the most electricity of any other country and they use more than double the next closest consumer, at 52,374 kw/hour.  This made me scratch my head a bit at first, because when I think of large energy consumers I think of Americans with huge t.v.s with surround sound, central air, and more useless kitchen appliances than anywhere else.  However, the article goes on to explain the conditions that contribute to Scandinavians high power usage.  First of all, they are located in a region with a very harsh climate.  They must use tons of electricity to heat their buildings.  Additionally the months of darkness in some regions require lights to be in constant use.  Another regional factor that leads to high electricity usage is manufacturing.  Since the region is abundant in natural resources like aluminum, a lot of electricity is needed to turn these resources into usable goods.  The natural resources in Scandanavia also keeps electricity prices cheap, so people are more likely to use high amounts.  Despite the high electricity usage by Scandanavians make minimal pollution because the sources of power they use are renewable resources.  This makes sense because these countries are able to harness a lot of hydropower with their access to the ocean and waterfalls. 
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Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography - ValueWalk

Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography - ValueWalk | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Considering China's long history - and the history of student movements - the current protests in Hong Kong will not be the last time China
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Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | Southmoore AP...

Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | Southmoore AP... | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
The story behind the Hong Kong pro-democracy protests (Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog #APHuG #APHG #sschat http://t.co/hoqU0wZbEm)...
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Which States Are in the Midwest?

Which States Are in the Midwest? | GEO 160 | Scoop.it
Here's a somewhat regular argument I get in: Which states make up which regions of the United States? Some of these regions -- the West Coast, Mountain States, Southwest and Northeast are pretty cl...

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Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:08 PM

I've gotten into this argument a couple times, the one that sticks out in my mind is one I had with a Rhode Island transplant from Illinois. Being a living historian of the American War for Independence, some of those 18th century ideas leak into my 21st century life. Those transplants, also living historians, were shocked to hear that I claimed anything West of the Appalachians was the "frontier" and therefore, anything above Kentucky and West of Nebraska was the "Midwest". We had a slight friendly exchange of words about what the Midwest is and where it really is. These regional borders Americans have created not only rely on topography, but also with vernacular and culture on a regional level. A state one day could be considered part of the Midwest but a few decades later could be part of Northeast, the South, or any of the other regions.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:03 PM

The map above shows the results of a survey that asked people if they thought their state was considered part of the Midwest or not. The highest percentage of responses of yes came from Illinoise at 81%. The lowest percentage of responses of yes came from Wyoming at 10%.This survey is a perfect example of how cultural factors influence how people see themselves spatially. Its a very interesting concept. Perceptual regions are hard to define by formal regions. It would have been interesting if this survey had shown where the responses were spatially in their state. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:31 PM
In my opinion, I believe that the Midwest is considered to be from North Dakota down to Kansas and from west to east, Nebraska to illinois. To me, the core of the Midwest would be Iowa, Illinois and Missouri. I have come to this conclusion based on how my grandfather used to tell me about the US. My grandfather was a contractor for a major corporation and traveled to all 48 contiguous states and whenever he was working in states such as Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, etc, he would tell me that he was in the midwest.
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