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Overseas visitors spending more in Australia than anywhere else

Overseas visitors spending more in Australia than anywhere else | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

Overseas travellers spend more on a visit to Australia than any other destination. The latest IVS released at the Australian Tourism Exchange in Melbourne showed the average spend by overseas visitors was $4500 a trip. World Tourism Organisation data had previously put Australia at the top of list for average spend per visitor, despite being only the 43rd most popular international destination. In 2014, a total of 6.9 million overseas visitors travelled down under and spent $31.1 billion. Cashed up Chinese travellers spent an average $6789 each, followed by the French who spent $5927 on Australian adventures. Find out more.


Via Tourism Australia
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This would be a fascinating place to visit . It is easy to see why tourist spend so much there.

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Africa’s Top 10 Business Schools

Africa’s Top 10 Business Schools | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
                            African Business Schools aim to help their students excel in management and business education in Africa.
Robert Slone's insight:

I believe the training for entrepreneurial is a wise way to keep workers in their native regions.

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Central Asia's capital cities have been building some of the most amazing and space-like architecture in the world

Central Asia's capital cities have been building some of the most amazing and space-like architecture in the world | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
The statue of a golden horse is just the beginning.

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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All I can is unique !!!

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Euro sinks close to 12-year low versus dollar

Euro sinks close to 12-year low versus dollar | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
The euro tumbled Tuesday towards a 12-year dollar low, hit by eurozone stimulus, growing US rate hike speculation and Greek debt concerns, dealers said. In morning London deals, the European single currency sank to $1.0735 -- the lowest level since mid-April 2003. The region's stock markets were lower. The shared eurozone unit continues to flounder one day after the European Central Bank launched its 1.1-trillion-euro ($1.2-trillion) quantitative easing (QE) stimulus "bazooka".

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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Michael Palin: Geography Matters

Former Monty Python star Michael Palin sits down with Steve Paikin for a feature interview on the importance of geographic literacy and why it is necessary f...

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Good to see someone in the public eye stress the importance of geography.

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Google Maps Smarty Pins - Geography Trivia Game

Google Maps Smarty Pins - Geography Trivia Game | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Smarty Pins is a Google Maps based geography and trivia game.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Robert Slone's insight:
This is a new way to study trivia and physical geography together.
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Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2015 2:30 AM

are these games fun? No idea.

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Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion

Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
There are more religiously unaffiliated Americans than Catholic Americans or mainline Protestant Americans.

 

Christianity is on the decline in America, not just among younger generations or in certain regions of the country but across race, gender, education and geographic barriers. The percentage of adults who describe themselves as Christians dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years to about 71 percent, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center.

 

Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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I have definitely witnessed this in my life time .

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:23 AM

It is a shame that millennials are declining religion more. Religion is one of the bases of culture. If you take away a base from a house it crumbles. The more we deny our religion, values, and culture in general the more we will become plain, and no longer culturally diverse.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:35 AM

Religion-Christianity in USA

Bradley Blocher's curator insight, April 4, 2017 1:18 PM
This article is related to our AP Human Geography due to the fact religion often plays an important role in the cultural make-up of a country or society. With Christianity declining in America, America will soon have  more problems with trials they may face since faith in God to help us as a nation get through things will no longer be a part of many people.
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Spring 2015: Risk of moderate flooding for parts of central and eastern United States | PHYS.org

Spring 2015: Risk of moderate flooding for parts of central and eastern United States | PHYS.org | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

According to NOAA's Spring Outlook released today, rivers in western New York and eastern New England have the greatest risk of spring flooding in part because of heavy snowpack coupled with possible spring rain. Meanwhile, widespread drought conditions are expected to persist in California, Nevada, and Oregon this spring as the dry season begins.

"Periods of record warmth in the West and not enough precipitation during the rainy season cut short drought-relief in California this winter and prospects for above average temperatures this spring may make the situation worse," said Jon Gottschalck, chief, Operational Prediction Branch,NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

NOAA's Spring Outlook identifies areas at risk of spring flooding and expectations for temperature, precipitation and drought from April through June. The Spring Outlook provides emergency managers, water managers, state and local officials, and the public with valuable information so they will be prepared to take action to protect life and property.

 

Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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the trickle effects of this crazy winter !!

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Verizon and AT&T: No Interest in Rural Areas | The Motley Fool

Verizon Communications, AT&T, Comcast , and several other large providers are working to implement state-specific deals to limit the build-out of broadband services for certain areas deemed "hard to reach."

 

According to a recent article in Newsweek, AT&T has already retained 120 lobbyists in Sacramento, and 36 in Lexington, KY. The goal of the lobby effort is to get rid of all obligations requiring large providers to service customers outside of profitable zones.


The Telecommunications Act of 1996 was a reformation of the Communications Act of 1934. In a nutshell, it deregulated the industry and opened it up to competition. In 2001, the FCC decided to create a National Broadband Plan to ensure every American has "access to broadband capability" by 2020. The plan was released in 2010, and in 2011 a decision was made to funnel funds from the Universal Service Fund, or USF, to the National Broadband Plan.

 

The annual budget for the fund is $4.5 billion over a six-year period (starting in 2011), and it's called the Connect America Fund, or CAF. The first phase of CAF funding has already been awarded -- use the interactive map below to see how much money your state received:

 

Click headline to read more and view the information in the interactive map by state--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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It is not always about profit . What about children in those areas that could use broadband to advance their education ?

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Solar Storm Brings Northern Lights To The MIDLANDS

Solar Storm Brings Northern Lights To The MIDLANDS | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
A massive solar storm is underway — and it might mean a rare chance to see the northern lights as far south as the Midlands, if the clouds are kind.

The Met Office said that a stellar geomagnetic storm was raging across the northern hemisphe...

Via Leicester Worker
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Better than 4th of July, I hope nobody's power goes out

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Open Education Week 2015 is a global event, March 9-13 | Opensource.com

Open Education Week 2015 is a global event, March 9-13 | Opensource.com | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

"Open Education Week (OEW) is an annual, global event and will take place this year from March 9-13, 2015. The event aims to raise awareness and celebrate achievements of the global Open Education Movement ..."


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DOLLY Is Not Your Mother's Map - Directions Magazine

DOLLY Is Not Your Mother's Map - Directions Magazine | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

Today’s maps aren’t the finite, two-dimensional, frustrating-to-fold piece of paper you or (if you are younger than 30) your parents tucked behind the sun visor of the family car. Today, a map of virtually anywhere on the planet can be accessed by one’s smart phone or even the computer installed in your car’s console.

 

Today’s geographers and their research are just as different as their predecessors’ paper maps. Their work is conducted totally in cyberspace and it has provided insightful snapshots of our world. 

 

One young University of Kentucky research team led by geography professor Matthew Zook spent more than two years collecting and analyzing 6.5 billion globally geotagged tweets (messages with a location specified by the sender or by GPS), and remarkable pictures of our world, its people and cultures evolved. They have explored how increased reliance on mobile devices that access the geoweb influences the way people view the physical realm. In a second paper, Zook with Mark Graham of the UK Oxford Internet Institute and doctoral candidate Andrew Boulton focused on digital mapmaking and the limitless bits of information that can be “attached” to a single geographic location, a spot on a virtual map ...


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Evolution makes the grade

Evolution makes the grade | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

Kansas, Kentucky and other states will also teach climate-change science.

 

Five US states have adopted science education standards that recommend introducing two highly charged topics — climate-change science and evolution — into classrooms well before high school.


Via SustainOurEarth
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this is great children need to be educated in all areas in order to make educated decisions about what they believe.

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Canada Media Advisory: Are We Failing Our Kids at Teaching Basic Geography? | DigitalJournal.com

Imagine meeting a businessperson who doesn't know where Africa is or can't identify the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Last January, a group of Memorial University sociology students in St. John's, N.L. made headlines when their professor revealed that many of them couldn't identify the world's continents. Some couldn't even identify the ocean that surrounds their province. After this initial disclosure, other Canadian university professors have come forward, divulging that Memorial University isn't the only institution with geo-illiterate students.

This set off alarm bells for geographers across Canada.

 

This coming weekend, geographers from across Canada are participating in a high-level meeting in St. John's, where the alarm bell was first sounded. They want to chart a plan of action to raise the profile of geography and to underline the importance of geoliteracy in the 21st century. John Geiger, CEO of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, says, "We short-change tomorrow's citizens and Canada's future when we don't provide today's students with a solid geographic education that ensures they are both geographically and spatially literate."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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when did we forget how important Geo-literacy is ?

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Central African Republic Economy Profile 2013 | glObserver Global Economics

Central African Republic Economy Profile 2013 | glObserver Global Economics | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Central African Republic Economy Profile 2013. Real gross domestic product (GDP) increase in 2012 was 3.1%, below initial forecasts of 4.2%.

Via Michael Malka
Robert Slone's insight:

I am glad to see improvement with education and gender equality . I believe that these are the bases of long termed  success .

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Jake & Ethan dragon slayers's curator insight, April 7, 2015 5:24 PM

It's good that their gap has increased. It should help their country get stronger and more welthy. It should help them and help the people.

 

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Japanese population falls to 15-year low

Japanese population falls to 15-year low | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
The total has shrunk for the fourth year running, falling back to a level it was last at in 2000, with more than one in four people now aged 65 or older
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Will this cause a tax increase in order to support the population over 65 ?

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Anthropologist Receives Mellon Fellowship Award to Study Endangered Ojibwe Language and Native American Traditions

Anthropologist Receives Mellon Fellowship Award to Study Endangered Ojibwe Language and Native American Traditions | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Anthropologist Receives Mellon Fellowship Award to Study Endangered Ojibwe Language and Native American Traditions
New classes in Ojibwe language and the construction and launch of a traditional birch bark canoe are among the programs funded by $206,500 grant

Released: 6-Nov-2014 4:00 PM EST
Source Newsroom: University of Massachusetts Amherst
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Newswise — AMHERST, Mass. – A University of Massachusetts Amherst anthropologist has received a major fellowship award to master the endangered Anishinaabemowin language of Native American Ojibwe tribal communities, in order to expand research and understanding of ancient tribal knowledge and practices that are under an increasing threat of becoming lost forever.
Sonya Atalay, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has been awarded a $206,500 New Directions Fellowship from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which will support her research through the summer of 2016. The fellowship grant will enable Atalay, who herself is Anishinaabe-Ojibwe, to take the time to develop a thorough knowledge of her native language, which is required to understand the meaning of giant earthwork mounds, ancient rock art and sacred birch bark scrolls that hold thousands of years of ceremonial knowledge and cultural teachings.
“Being able to communicate with elders and spiritual leaders about our sacred sites, landscapes and teachings in Anishinaabemowin is crucial to trying to understand and protect this history,” Atalay explains. “The only problem is that I only know about 200 words in the language. I can introduce myself, say thank you (miigwech), name a few animals and foods and say a few common phrases, and that’s about it. I need to learn Anishinabemowin. My goal is to become proficient in the language in one year. My grant provides me the luxury of having a year of teaching leave to focus on this full time – something few people are able to do.”
As the remaining numbers of those entrusted as “keepers of tradition” among the Anishinaabe-Ojibwe people decline and sacred tribal sites are constantly under threat of destruction by development, the knowledge Atalay will gain from the fellowship will be critical in creating partnerships between tribal elders and the community. To ensure that the songs, stories, beliefs, practices and culture of the Anishinaabe are respectfully protected and preserved for future generations of tribal descendants, researchers, historians and the general public, she will work with elders and spiritual leaders to determine which cultural knowledge is appropriate to share and what needs to remain private.
“Anishinaabe language and traditional knowledge contain complex and nuanced ways of understanding the natural world all around us,” Atalay says. “With this grant I’m attempting to gather and braid together strands of knowledge that are often separated and studied independently in universities. I’m drawing connections between earthworks, archaeological mounds and ancient rock art to reclaim teachings that our ancestors left written on the land, saw in waterways and recognized through traditional star knowledge. The Mellon Foundation’s New Directions Fellowship will allow me to use digital technologies to connect traditional tribal knowledge with sophisticated geographic information system (GIS) mapping to learn how people of the Great Lakes engaged with the landscape and natural environment thousands of years ago. This can help us understand our contemporary world, even provide solutions for navigating some of our most pressing global concerns.”
To learn the language, Atalay has used a portion of her grant award to bring Howard Kimewon to the UMass Amherst campus as a lecturer on Ojibwe in the anthropology department. Kimewon, a first-language speaker of Anishinaabemowin who was born and raised on the Wikwemikong First Nation reserve in Canada, will teach Ojibwe language and culture courses at both UMass and Amherst College through a partnership with the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages.
Supported with funding from the UMass anthropology department, Amherst College and the Five College Consortium, Kimewon is also leading Atalay and UMass students in the construction of an authentic native canoe built of birch bark and white ash, which will be launched in the Connecticut River next spring. Atalay and Kimewon believe that the event will mark the first time a traditional native birch bark canoe has been launched in Western Massachusetts in well over 200 years.
“In working on the birch bark canoe I’ve realized how language reflects culture,” she says. “Take the word notkwemahza –in Anishinaabemowin this single verb means ‘he passes by in a canoe, singing a love song to his sweetheart.’ Imagine the depth of meaning and care for the natural environment and social relationships that would be glossed over or lost completely if we lose this language. Language immersion on the canoe also highlights the importance of water in Anishinaabe culture. Our rivers and waterways are hurting as we face an escalating global crisis for clean water. Similarly, we are in a time of crisis for our Anishinaabe language. It takes commitment and partnerships, but also practical things, like time and funding, to ensure that the sound of the Anishinaabe language continues to flow into the future. Time is critical. As our remaining fluent first-language speakers age, it’s during this generation that the Anishinaabe language will be lost or make a comeback. I see our work here at UMass Amherst as part of a shared journey to reclaim our language and all the complex and nuanced cultural knowledge it carries.”
In addition to cutting-edge GIS software, Atalay is using a number of new media, social media and academic technology tools during her fellowship. She and Kimewon are recording and digitizing every Ojibwe class held on the UMass campus, and Atalay is video blogging about the project on YouTube and using Twitter to share new words and phrases she learns using #TweetADayOjibwe.
“There are few people who have the opportunity to focus full time on learning a language – and particularly an endangered indigenous language. So, I’ve decided to document this journey of language reclamation,” she says. “In reflecting on this over the past few months, I’ve come to realize that learning Anishinaabemowin is far more than just acquiring a skill that’s needed for a new research project. This effort is part of a larger commitment and passion I have for decolonizing my research practices, and it contributes to larger efforts in many communities for the revitalization of our beautiful Anishinaabe culture, teachings, language and lifeways. But this is also a very personal journey – a journey of re-connecting to my ancestors, to those who came before me, and passing on some of their knowledge, in the very same spoken words and language, for the generations who will follow.”
New Directions Fellowships assist faculty members in the humanities, broadly understood to include the arts, history, languages, area studies, and zones of such fields as anthropology and geography that bridge the humanities and social sciences, who seek to acquire systematic training outside their own areas of special interest. The program is intended to enable strong scholars in the humanities to work on problems that interest them most, at an appropriately advanced level of sophistication. In addition to facilitating the work of individual faculty members, the awards benefit humanistic scholarship more generally by encouraging the highest standards in cross-disciplinary research.
Unlike other fellowship awards, the New Directions Fellowship program does not aim to facilitate short-term outcomes, such as the completion of a book or research paper. Rather, it is meant to facilitate a longer-term investment in scholars’ intellectual range and productivity.

Via Charles Tiayon
Robert Slone's insight:

There is nothing more exciting than study customs and traditions of various people across the world.

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Virtual Reality Paves Way for Field Trips with Goggles

Virtual Reality Paves Way for Field Trips with Goggles | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Virtual reality technology is bringing diverse experiences to the classroom, from college tours to field trips and map/geography exploration.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Robert Slone's insight:

Field trips sure have changed. When I was in school ( 70's and 80;s) going to the local library or fire department was a big deal .

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
Robert Slone's insight:

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 2015 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 2015 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

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Polar bears feel the heat as icy habitat shrinks | Alex Kirby | Climate News Network

Polar bears feel the heat as icy habitat shrinks | Alex Kirby | Climate News Network | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

The Arctic is changing faster under the influence of the warming climate than anywhere else on Earth, scientists have confirmed.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says Arctic air temperatures continue to rise more than twice as fast as they do globally − a phenomenon known as Arctic amplification.

The extent of snow cover in April 2014 in Eurasia was the lowest since 1967, and sea ice extent in September was the sixth lowest since 1979.

Some Arctic polar bear populations have been badly affected by the progressive shrinking of Arctic sea ice.

But NOAA says: “Natural variation remains, such as the slight increase in March 2014 sea ice thickness and only a slight decrease in total mass of the Greenland ice sheet in summer 2014.”

Increasing air and sea surface temperatures, a decline in the reflectivity of the ice at the surface of the Greenland ice sheet, shrinking spring snow cover on land and summer ice on the ocean, and the declining populations and worsening health of some bear populations are among the findings described in NOAA’s Arctic Report Card 2014.

“Arctic warming is setting off changes that affect people and the environment in this fragile region, and has broader effects beyond the Arctic on global security, trade and climate,” Craig McLean, of NOAA, told the annual American Geophysical Union Fall meeting in San Francisco.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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we need to take this seriously !!

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Weather shifts force Kentuckiana farmers to try different crops, cultivation methods

Weather shifts force Kentuckiana farmers to try different crops, cultivation methods | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
While some of them still aren't convinced that humans are to blame, farmers across the nation — including those in Kentucky and Indiana — increasingly acknowledge that they're having to deal with the consequences of climate change.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Regardless of what causes climate change ,we need to be responsible and accept it.

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Rocket flown through northern lights to help unlock space weather mysteries | Tony Borroz | GizMag.com

Rocket flown through northern lights to help unlock space weather mysteries | Tony Borroz | GizMag.com | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

The northern lights are more than one of nature's most awe inspiring sights, they are an electromagnetic phenomena that can adversely affect power grids and communications and navigation systems. Researchers from the University of Oslo have flown a rocket through the phenomena to take a closer look with the aim of gathering data that will help in predicting space weather.

The northern lights are caused by solar flares from the Sun. But these same solar flares are the source of more than just the Aurora Borealis. On the Earth’s day side, sunlight strips electrons loose from the atmosphere, forming clouds of electrons that drift across the Arctic and, although they are invisible to our eyes, appear on radar screens and in super-sensitive cameras.

Within just a few hours, electron clouds that form during the day over North America can cross the Arctic and reach Scandinavia after being drawn out of the polar region by the northern lights. The University of Oslo researchers have found that it is when electron clouds coincide with the northern lights that the most serious interference to navigation and satellite systems occurs. It is these rare but disruptive events that the ICI4 rocket, which launched today from Andoya Space Center in Norway, is tasked with exploring.

"We wished to find the causes of these interferences," says Jøran Moen, Project Director. "We need this knowledge to establish a forecasting system for space weather."

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Robert Slone's insight:

Can you imagine being in that rocket that would be so amazing.

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Nathanael Gregory Law's curator insight, February 27, 2015 4:30 PM

I have already posted a similar article talking about Space Weather and its potential impacts on our own weather on Earth, but I wanted to share this with you all because this dealt with a specific aspect of Space Weather. Understanding what the Northern Lights are and how they wreak havoc on our technology is important for future forecasting of these events. This webpage discusses what was done with this experiment and what we can gain from it. Please take a look! 

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From Florida to ‘Chi-beria,’ no escaping grip of record-breaking polar vortex

From Florida to ‘Chi-beria,’ no escaping grip of record-breaking polar vortex | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

Schools have been closed and residents have been warned to stay inside after reports of historically low temperatures in the Midwest. NBC's Dylan Dreyer reports from Green Bay, Wis.

JetBlue Airways, recovering from heavy weekend delays and getting ready for a deep freeze in the Northeast, took the extraordinary step Monday of grounding flights for 17 hours at four of the busiest airports in the country.

The shutdown, which covers the three major New York airports and Boston’s Logan, will take effect at 5 p.m. ET Monday, the airline said in a statement. JetBlue said it would ramp up service again at 10 a.m. ET Tuesday and expects to be fully operational again by 3 p.m.

“We regret the impact to our customers,” the airline said in a statement.

Bad weather over the weekend forced thousands of delays and cancellations for major airlines. JetBlue said it made the decision to “ensure recovery of our operations as efficiently as possible and be fully operable by tomorrow.” It said the shutdown would provide rest for its equipment and crews.

JetBlue, one of the largest airlines serving the Northeast, also cited forecast “flash freezing” and record low temperatures, perhaps as low as zero, by the end of Monday night in the New York area.

A churning mass of record-breaking, life-threatening arctic air is pushing across the country, so broad that every state except Hawaii is expected to face freezing temperatures by Tuesday.

The worst of it on Monday — wind chills ranging from 20 to 50 degrees below zero — was across the Northern Plains and the Midwest. The air temperature in Chicago, which took on the nickname of “Chi-beria,” was 15 below, the coldest ever there for Jan. 6.

“These temperatures that will be out there will be lower than what’s in your freezer,” warned Greg Ballard, the mayor of Indianapolis.

Twenty-six states were under warnings or watches for severe wind chill as the result of a weather phenomenon known as a polar vortex — essentially an arctic cyclone that normally sits near the North Pole but has pushed unusually far south.

It was 10 below on Monday morning in Green Bay, Wis., with a wind chill of minus 40 — even colder than Sunday, when some tailgaters at an NFL playoff game fired up second grills just for warmth, and others worried that their beer would freeze.

Kevin Roth, a lead meteorologist for The Weather Channel, warned that anyone venturing outside without wrapping up risked frostbite in a matter of minutes or even seconds.

“This winter storm will be one for the record books,” said Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, who encouraged people to stay inside unless absolutely necessary.

It was already the most depressing day of the year, according to a British study that blamed the return to work for many people, the hangover from holiday spending and busted New Year’s resolutions.

The cold simply added to the misery. Examples were everywhere:

— More than 1,500 flights into and out of Chicago’s O’Hare airport were canceled on Monday, creating cascading problems across the country’s air-travel network. Similar disruptions are expected later this week on the East Coast.

— In Minnesota, the governor ordered schools across the state closed because of the extreme weather, the first time that has happened in 17 years, forcing working parents to scramble. Class was called off in Chicago and parts of at least four other states.

— Tens of thousands of people in Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin were without power after a weekend snowstorm. Utilities said almost 42,000 homes and businesses were without power in Indiana. It was 11 degrees below zero at midday in Indianapolis.

— The Indianapolis mayor declared a level-red travel emergency, which made it illegal for anyone to drive except for emergencies or to get to shelter. It was the first time that had happened since 1978.

Farther south, rain that fell across an area from Atlanta to Charlotte, N.C., froze and slickened roads on Monday. Georgia transportation officials said they were watching for reports of dangerous, hard-to-spot black ice.

The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency, expecting the coldest air in that state in 20 years, declared a state of emergency and warned drivers to stay off the roads because of the risk of flash-freezing from scattered snow and sleet.

Along Interstate 57 in Illinois, the Southern Illinois University men’s basketball team, traveling home by bus after a loss at Illinois State, got stuck in the snow. The team wound up sleeping on the floor of a church in the city of Tuscola.

— It was so cold overnight that both engines froze on an Amtrak train from Detroit to Chicago, stranding passengers for nine hours just past Kalamazoo, Mich., until another train arrived to tug it the rest of the way home.

The heat stayed on, but the episode tested patience.

“Not exactly in the best of spirits,” Valerie King, a journalism student at Northwestern University, posted to Twitter from inside the train. Finally in Chicago, she snapped a photo of the train’s outside, which looked freezer-burned.

— The National Weather Service warned of lake-effect snow, particularly in western New York. Areas outside Buffalo could accumulate up to 3 feet, with whipping winds making snowdrifts even higher.

— The cold posed a danger to the homeless. The Chicago Transit Authority gave fare cards to social workers to hand out so people with nowhere to go could ride buses and trains to stay warm.

“We’re extremely packed,” Kenneth Newton, a director at the Hope Center shelter in Lexington, Ky., told The Associated Press. About 240 men took refuge there overnight, and some had to sleep on mattresses on the floor, he said.

— Florida citrus growers crossed their fingers. A spokesman for Florida Citrus Mutual, an industry group, told the AP that the danger zone was 28 degrees for four hours straight, suggesting it was going to be a close call.

Frigid weather grapples much of the nation. Find out what the cold weather has in store for the rest of the week. Meteorologist Mike Seidel  and  NBC's Al Roker report.

As the arctic air extends its grip, high temperatures on Tuesday are expected to reach only the teens in Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, and the single digits further inland.

Lows in the single digits were possible as far south as Atlanta, which hasn’t been that cold in more than 10 years.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Robert Slone's insight:

It is amazing how much I have seen the climate change in the United States since I was a child in the 70's .

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Rescooped by Robert Slone from GHS Nature of Geography & Population Geography
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Human Geography is essential to understanding our world | Kentucky Teacher

Human Geography is essential to understanding our world | Kentucky Teacher | GEO-160 | Scoop.it

Via Mr Ortloff
Robert Slone's insight:

Great example of practical application of Geography.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 21, 2013 10:07 PM

Why is geography important?????

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Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | GEO-160 | Scoop.it
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.
Robert Slone's insight:

This interactive map is phenomenal teaching tool that would be great for teaching elementary school children introductory geography,

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:14 AM

History of maps

tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:11 AM

Can generate some useful observations,discussions and debates in class

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:00 PM

It is notable that the world's map has changed much since the advent of cartography, and many believed that the Americas were part of Asia. This is represented in the map.