Gentlemachines
7.3K views | +1 today
Follow
Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Patriot Act Faces Revisions Backed by Both Parties

Patriot Act Faces Revisions Backed by Both Parties | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The push for reform is the strongest demonstration of a shift from a focus on national security at the expense of civil liberties to a new balance in the post-Edward J. Snowden era.
Artur Alves's insight:

«

After more than a decade of wrenching national debate over the intrusiveness of government intelligence agencies, a bipartisan wave of support has gathered to sharply limit the federal government’s sweeps of phone and Internet records.

On Thursday, a bill that would overhaul the Patriot Act and curtail the so-called metadata surveillance exposed by Edward J. Snowden was overwhelmingly passed by the House Judiciary Committee and was heading to almost certain passage in that chamber this month.

An identical bill in the Senate — introduced with the support of five Republicans — is gaining support over the objection of Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, who is facing the prospect of his first policy defeat since ascending this year to majority leader.

The push for reform is the strongest demonstration yet of a decade-long shift from a singular focus on national security at the expense of civil liberties to a new balance in the post-Snowden era.

«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Digital rights and freedoms: Part 1

Digital rights and freedoms: Part 1 | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Under the rubric of state security on
the one hand and commercial openness on the other, we are being lulled into an
online world of fear and control where our every move is monitored in order to
more efficiently manage us. See Part 2.
Artur Alves's insight:

«

The rapidity of technological change has vastly outpaced the development of our laws, institutions and regulatory systems, along with the articulation of the ethical categories and principles with which to understand and evaluate them. Under the rubric of state security on the one hand and commercial openness on the other, we are being lulled into an online world of fear and control where our every move is monitored in order to more efficiently manage us.

It is a far cry from the utopianism of the early internet era. The open architecture of the internet still offers fantastic possibilities for human liberation. It has provided new tools with which citizens can organize to contest power and challenge official narratives. 

As with any new technology however the internet was introduced into a society already marked by economic and social hierarchies. In the absence of countervailing forces, dominant groups have largely determined the direction in which the technology has developed and as a result it has reinforced the dominant neoliberal paradigm of unfettered markets and property rights buttressed by increasingly authoritarian states.

«

Digital rights and freedoms: Part 1Guy Aitchison 31 March 2015

Under the rubric of state security on the one hand and commercial openness on the other, we are being lulled into an online world of fear and control where our every move is monitored in order to more efficiently manage us. See Part 2.

Anti-CCTV graffiti on the wall of the British Library. Wikicommons/ Oxyman. Some rights reserved.

This article launches a new section of the Great Charter Convention dedicated to debate and analysis of democracy, politics and freedom in the digital age. It is clear that we are at a crucial historical juncture. The issues around state power and surveillance raised by Edward Snowden’s revelations should be an important theme in the upcoming general election, while the symbolic double anniversary of Magna Carta (aged 800) and the web (aged 25) offers an opportunity for critical reflection on how to upgrade fundamental liberties in response to new threats and re-imagine how technology can serve the common good.

We are to a great extent playing catch-up. The rapidity of technological change has vastly outpaced the development of our laws, institutions and regulatory systems, along with the articulation of the ethical categories and principles with which to understand and evaluate them. Under the rubric of state security on the one hand and commercial openness on the other, we are being lulled into an online world of fear and control where our every move is monitored in order to more efficiently manage us.

It is a far cry from the utopianism of the early internet era. The open architecture of the internet still offers fantastic possibilities for human liberation. It has provided new tools with which citizens can organize to contest power and challenge official narratives. 

As with any new technology however the internet was introduced into a society already marked by economic and social hierarchies. In the absence of countervailing forces, dominant groups have largely determined the direction in which the technology has developed and as a result it has reinforced the dominant neoliberal paradigm of unfettered markets and property rights buttressed by increasingly authoritarian states.

Faced with this reality, how do we protect and enhance human freedom? Is it enough to apply earlier claims of rights to new circumstances? Or does the current regime of power and surveillance demand that earlier ethical categories have to be rethought or even entirely replaced? What are the collective institutions and structures required for an internet based not solely on profit but on human flourishing?

These are the broad questions we will explore. Though it would be foolish to pretend a document drawn up by feudal barons contains the answers, the Magna Carta furnishes a rich tradition of resistance to arbitrary power to inspire and orientate contemporary struggles. It has, as Peter Linebaugh reminds us, always been a ‘work in progress’ with a symbolic vitality that animated the later democratic demands of the Levellers in the English civil war, campaigns against slavery and anti-imperial struggles in America and elsewhere. Despite appeals to self-evident and timeless truths, rights have always been a historical project, expanded from below by political struggles that radicalised the core principle of human freedom and applied it to new political subjects in new domains.

Now the inventor of the web Tim Berners Lee has challenged digital citizens to help draft a ‘Magna Carta for the web’ as part of the wider Web we Want campaign. The group hopes to mobilise global public opinion around a set of core principles of free expression, accessibility, privacy, openness and network neutrality. They are showcasing their campaign with a series of festivals at London’s South Bank (with the next one in May), adding to the excellent work of Open Rights Group, Privacy International and other established campaign for digital rights and freedoms.

The call for a new set of safeguards is the very opposite of Tory proposals for a ‘British Bill of Rights’ to replace the Human Rights Act. The ruling party’s view is based on a reactionary and minimalist view of Magna Carta as ‘enough’. This is antithetical to the document’s radical historical tradition and the role it played in shaping the modern idea of human rights, including Article 8 on the right to privacy in the European Convention on Human Rights that can be traced back to the right for respect for one’s home in English law.

The parliamentary assembly of the European Court has called the scale of GCHQ’s spying ‘stunning’ and found it in violation of rights to privacy, free expression and a fair trial. If a future Tory government carries out its plan, and withdraws from the European Convention, the UK government would be embracing pariah status; the first worldwide to introduce a new bill of rights with the aim of providing fewer rights to its citizens. If a future Tory government carries out its plan, and withdraws from the European Convention, the UK government would be embracing pariah status; the first worldwide to introduce a new bill of rights with the aim of providing fewer rights to its citizens. Without the protection of European human rights law, UK citizens will be left systematically vulnerable. Ed Miliband has at least committed to retaining the ECHR yet he has typically fudged the issue of mass surveillance and failed to take a principled line, despite initial promises he made to reverse the authoritarian inheritance of New Labour.

Naturally, any debate about state power and the role of technology cannot be divorced from wider arguments about the kind of politics and society we wish to create.  The legal scholar Julie E. Cohen points out the parallels with the era of industrialisation where transformations in technology and the accompanying social upheavals brought with them new threats to human freedom. Violent processes of enclosure robbed peasants of their traditional way of life and subjected them to new humiliations and cruelties in the factories. It took years for workers to develop effective forms of organisation through trade unions and to name and diagnose the harms that underscored moral claims to limits on the working day, decent pay and conditions, and later to a social minimum from the surplus they produced. We now find ourselves in a new industrial revolution – the second machine age. We now find ourselves in a new industrial revolution – the second machine age.

The net offers novel threats and organisational challenges, as well as new possibilities for human flourishing. With the spying agencies and corporations pushing through a new infrastructure of social control in pursuit of state power and limitless accumulation, it is up to us, as digital citizens, to fight back and define a new regime of protections and entitlements. There are a number of themes to this debate that we aim to explore, drawing on the insight of the many excellent campaigns and experts working in these areas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The Pirate Party's 'Poetician' Plans to Make Iceland a Data Haven

The Pirate Party's 'Poetician' Plans to Make Iceland a Data Haven | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Birgitta Jónsdóttir wants to make Iceland the 'Switzerland of bits.'
Artur Alves's insight:

«

Legislating transparency and security takes time. The work remains slow, while the stakes have grown. Jónsdóttir discovered that  she has been the subject of US Department of Justice ordered surveillance since November 1, 2009. The Snowden revelations have proved that the extent of surveillance is far greater than thought, causing greater concern for the IMMI resolution to protect sources.

Under the Espionage Act of 1917, the founding legislation under which the Obama administration has prosecuted more whistleblowers during his terms than all former US presidents combined, all the while surveilling allies like Angela Merkel. Now more than ever, it would seem the world needs doubled-down legal protection for journalists, and safe haven for information uncovered, to which the public has a right to know.

«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications

Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Exclusive: Whistleblower says NSA revelations mean those with duty to protect confidentiality must urgently upgrade security Watch Snowden's interview with the Guardian in Moscow Read the full interview with Snowden by Alan Rusbridger and Ewen...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The Connection Between The Copyright Industry And The NSA | TorrentFreak

The Connection Between The Copyright Industry And The NSA | TorrentFreak | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
There is a direct connection between copyright monopoly enforcement and mass surveillance, and between mass surveillance and lack of free speech. If you want to keep free speech, the copyright monopoly must be reduced sharply.
Artur Alves's insight:
"(...) copyright monopoly cannot be enforced without mass surveillance. There is no way to tell a private conversation in a digital environment from a monopolized audio file being transferred, not without actually looking at what’s being transferred. At that point, the secrecy of correspondence has been broken and mass surveillance introduced. The copyright industry has been continuously and relentlessly pushing for more mass surveillance, including surveillance of citizens who aren’t under any suspicion (“mass surveillance”) for this reason. They defended the now-illegal Data Retention Directive, which logs everybody’s communications and location all the time (specifically including yours), as well as similar initiatives."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

NSA surveillance program reaches ‘into the past’ to retrieve, replay phone calls

NSA surveillance program reaches ‘into the past’ to retrieve, replay phone calls | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The surveillance system is capable of recording “100 percent” of calls in at least one foreign country.
Artur Alves's insight:

"The National Security Agency has built a surveillance system capable of recording “100 percent” of a foreign country’s telephone calls, enabling the agency to rewind and review conversations as long as a month after they take place, according to people with direct knowledge of the effort and documents supplied by former contractor Edward Snowden.

A senior manager for the program compares it to a time machine — one that can replay the voices from any call without requiring that a person be identified in advance for surveillance.

The voice interception program, called MYSTIC, began in 2009. Its RETRO tool, short for “retrospective retrieval,” and related projects reached full capacity against the first target nation in 2011. Planning documents two years later anticipated similar operations elsewhere."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

How Your Body's Unique Biosignatures Are Used for Surveillance

How Your Body's Unique Biosignatures Are Used for Surveillance | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Not long ago, fingerprints were the cutting edge of biometric profiling. Today, the use of biosignatures to identify individuals has expanded to include everything from iris and facial scans right through to DNA profiling and even the unique shape of a person's ass. Here's what you need to know about how companies and governments are tracking your biometrics.
Artur Alves's insight:

Biometrics go beyond facial recognition and fingerprint. They are also less discussed in the media than computer and network surveillance. This piece in io9.com takes us through the modes of biometric surveillance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Want to Predict the Future of Surveillance? Ask Poor Communities.

Want to Predict the Future of Surveillance? Ask Poor Communities. | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Marginalized groups are often governments' test subjects. Here are a few lessons we can learn from their experiences.
Artur Alves's insight:

"Poor and working-class Americans already live in the surveillance future. The revelations that are so scandalous to the middle-class data profiling, PRISM, tapped cellphones–are old news to millions of low-income Americans, immigrants, and communities of color. To be smart about surveillance in the New Year, we must learn from the experiences of marginalized people in the U.S. and in developing countries the world over. Here are four lessons we might learn if we do.

#1: Surveillance is a civil rights issue.

#2: To a hammer, everything looks like a nail [Solutions are built and tested in convenient, distant contexts long before being made public] 

#3: Everyone resists surveillance, not just the bad guys.

#4: Privacy is not the problem."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

I Spent Two Hours Talking With the NSA's Bigwigs. Here's What Has Them Mad | Threat Level | Wired.com

I Spent Two Hours Talking With the NSA's Bigwigs. Here's What Has Them Mad | Threat Level | Wired.com | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
My expectations were low when I asked the National Security Agency to cooperate with my story on the impact of Edward Snowden’s leaks on the tech industry. Imagine my surprise when they agreed to let me behind the fence.
Artur Alves's insight:

Steven Levy's (short) report of his visit to the NSA. Apparently, "They really hate Snowden" and "[t]hey believe their intelligence gathering is palatable because it’s controlled by laws, regulations, and internal oversight"... Naturally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

NSA phone surveillance program likely unconstitutional, federal judge rules

NSA phone surveillance program likely unconstitutional, federal judge rules | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Collection of US phone metadata 'likely' in breach of fourth amendment as judge describes scope of programe as 'Orwellian'
Artur Alves's insight:

"A federal judge in Washington ruled on Monday that the bulk collection of Americans’ telephone records by the National Security Agency is likely to violate the US constitution, in the most significant legal setback for the agency since the publication of the first surveillance disclosures by the whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Judge Richard Leon declared that the mass collection of metadata probably violates the fourth amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, and was "almost Orwellian" in its scope. In a judgment replete with literary swipes against the NSA, he said James Madison, the architect of the US constitution, would be "aghast" at the scope of the agency’s collection of Americans' communications data."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Web inventor in surveillance warning

Web inventor in surveillance warning | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

Web creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee has warned that the democratic nature of the net is threatened by a "growing tide of surveillance and censorship".

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Surveillance blowback: the making of the US surveillance state, 1898-2020 | openDemocracy

Surveillance blowback: the making of the US surveillance state, 1898-2020 | openDemocracy | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

"The American surveillance state is now an omnipresent reality, but its deep history is little known and its future little grasped.  Edward Snowden’s leaked documents reveal that, in a post-9/11 state of war, the National Security Agency (NSA) was able to create a surveillance system that could secretly monitor the private communications of almost every American in the name of fighting foreign terrorists. The technology used is state of the art; the impulse, it turns out, is nothing new. For well over a century, what might be called “surveillance blowback” from America’s wars has ensured the creation of an ever more massive and omnipresent internal security and surveillance apparatus.  Its future (though not ours) looks bright indeed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

How Microsoft handed the NSA access to encrypted messages

How Microsoft handed the NSA access to encrypted messages | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Documents show company collaborated closely with NSA and FBI to help agencies intercept data
Artur Alves's insight:

"The files provided by Edward Snowden illustrate the scale of co-operation between Silicon Valley and the intelligence agencies over the last three years. They also shed new light on the workings of the top-secret Prism program, which was disclosed by the Guardian and the Washington Post last month.

The documents show that:

• Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;

• The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;

• The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;

• Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;

• In July last year, nine months after Microsoft bought Skype, the NSA boasted that a new capability had tripled the amount of Skype video calls being collected through Prism;

• Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport"."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Inside the Mildly Dystopic World of a Manhattan Security and Surveillance Expo | VICE | United States

Inside the Mildly Dystopic World of a Manhattan Security and Surveillance Expo | VICE | United States | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
I was in the belly of the 25th Annual ASIS NYC Security Conference and Expo, a peek into the near-future of surveillance aided by the people who were really amped about it. A salesman for SafeRise and I played with Minority Report–like cameras that scan your face and can detect if you're "unauthorized." A few young guys from a company called Total Recall Corporation told me their big-box cameras are scattered across Times Square. This was the sort of place where naming your company after a dystopic sci-fi film appeared to be a selling point.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Digital surveillance examined in the Annual report of the Special Rapporteur to the General Assembly

Multilingual interface of the UN Official Documents System
Artur Alves's insight:

«In section III, the Special Rapporteur examines the use of mass digital surveillance for counter-terrorism purposes, and considers the implications of bulk access technology for the right to privacy under article 17 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

US Attorney General urges tech companies to leave device backdoors open for police

US Attorney General urges tech companies to leave device backdoors open for police | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
His remarks followed announcements from Apple and Google earlier this month of new smartphone encryption policies.
Artur Alves's insight:

«Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said on Tuesday that new forms of encryption capable of locking law enforcement officials out of popular electronic devices imperil investigations of kidnappers and sexual predators, putting children at increased risk

 

In his comments, Holder became the highest government official to publicly chastise technology companies for developing systems that make it difficult for law enforcement officials to collect potential evidence, even when they have search warrants. Though he didn’t mention Apple and Google by name, his remarks followed their announcements this month of new smartphone encryption policies that have sparked a sharp government response, including from FBI Director James B. Comey last week.

 

«

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The rise of the surveillance state - Peter Vlemmix - PANOPTICON (documentary)

A free documentary about the rise of the surveillance state by Peter Vlemmix.

Control on our daily lives increases and privacy is disappearing. How is this exactly happening and in which way will it effect all our lives?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Bugged Routers, Spy Sales Pitches, and Other New NSA PowerPoint Bangers

Bugged Routers, Spy Sales Pitches, and Other New NSA PowerPoint Bangers | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Glenn Greenwald's new book about the Edward Snowden affair is already breaking new revelations of NSA spying programs.
Artur Alves's insight:

«Just as Glenn Greenwald’s scoops on the Edward Snowden NSA revelations seemed to be quieting down, his new book No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the U.S. Surveillance State is already breaking new revelations about the American spy agency. 

In an excerpt from his book on the Guardian website published last night, Greenwald accuses the NSA of covertly installing backdoor interceptions to “routers, servers, and other computer network devices,” being exported from the US before delivery to international customers. Part of a wider NSA practice of supply-chain interdiction, the agency intercepts American products manufactured by companies like Cisco and physically tampers with products, installing beacons for surveillance transmissions. According to Greenwald, after the bugs are installed, the NSA “repackages the devices with a factory seal, and sends them on” to unsuspecting users.

In the same excerpt Greenwald cites the irony of American intelligence agencies warning users about backdoor bugging in Chinese-made technologies used for espionage. “American companies were being warned away from supposedly untrustworthy Chinese routers, foreign organizations would have been well advised to beware of American-made ones,” Greenwald says.«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Berners-Lee: World wide web needs bill of rights

Berners-Lee: World wide web needs bill of rights | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

The inventor of the world wide web has marked the 25th anniversary of his creation by calling for a 'Magna Carta' bill of rights to protect its users.

Artur Alves's insight:

"Sir Tim said the internet should be a "neutral" medium that can be used without feeling "somebody's looking over our shoulder".

He called for vigilance against surveillance by its users, adding: "The people of the world have to be constantly aware, constantly looking out for it - constantly making sure through action, protest, that it doesn't happen."

Sir Tim has previously warned that surveillance could threaten the democratic nature of the web.

He has also spoken out in support of Mr Snowden, saying his actions were "in the public interest".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Ukraine’s 1984 moment: Government using cellphones to track protesters

Ukraine’s 1984 moment: Government using cellphones to track protesters | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

“Dear subscriber, you are registered as a participant in a mass disturbance.” That's the chilling text message people near the clash between Ukrainian riot police and protestersin Kiev yesterday received shortly after midnight, Andrew E. Kramer at the New York Times reports.

Artur Alves's insight:

«As eerie as the text message may seem, it was likely not technically difficult to achieve. Presumably, authorities could determine who was in the vicinity of the protest by going through the records of nearby cell towers. In the United States, that type of information can be requested from mobile providers in the form of "tower dumps" which reveal the locations of hundreds or thousands of innocent citizens associated with a specific cell tower, along with suspects. A recent congressional inquiry shows that U.S. law enforcement made more than 9,000 requests for tower dumps in 2012.

Cell site location data is considered metadata. The U.S. government denies that it is currently tracking mobile phone locations domestically, although it admits to running a test project on the subject in recent years. And documents leaked by former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden show the NSA tracks 5 billion mobile device locations daily around the world.

"This incident highlights how location metadata — contrary to NSA defenders' claims that such data isn't sensitive — is incredibly powerful, especially in bulk, and can easily be used by governments to identify and suppress protesters attempting to exercise their right to free expression," says Kevin Bankston, policy director for the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute.«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The NSA and surveillance ... made simple - video animation

Confused about the NSA revelations? Find out how the activities of GCHQ and the NSA affect you with our animation
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

How the NSA Almost Killed the Internet | Threat Level | Wired.com

How the NSA Almost Killed the Internet | Threat Level | Wired.com | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and the other tech titans have had to fight for their lives against their own government. An exclusive look inside their year from hell—and why the Internet will never be the same.
Artur Alves's insight:

A very enterprise-friendly piece by Steven Levy. The transparency of Silicon Valley companies has always raised doubts and considered wanting.

 

"The clash illustrates a seemingly irresolvable conflict. While Silicon Valley must be transparent in many regards, spy agencies operate under a cloak of obfuscation. There is certainly a reason for the secrecy; evildoers who use an Internet service presumably would be less likely to keep using it if they were aware that the pro­vider was sharing communications with the NSA. But one of the disturbing conse­quences of secret programs is the destructive shroud of doubt they cast over every­thing they touch. Months after Snowden’s leak, basic facts about Prism remain elusive. How much information is actually collected by the program? Exactly what kind of cooperation did the companies offer after those dates specified on that NSA PowerPoint slide? The companies contend that in addition to what they can’t say, there’s plenty they don’t know.

...

But even if the spy programs are viewed as justified, and whether they are tempered or not, we’re still left with the most sickening aspect of the Snowden revelations: The vast troves of information gathered from our digital activities will forever be seen as potential fodder for government intelligence agencies. A lot of people became inured to worries about Little Brother—private companies—knowing what we bought, where we were, what we were saying, and what we were searching for. Now it turns out that Big Brother can access that data too. It could not have been otherwise. The wealth of data we share on our computers, phones, and tablets is irresistible to a government determined to prevent the next disaster, even if the effort stretches laws beyond the comprehension of those who voted for them. And even if it turns the US into the number one adversary of American tech companies and their privacy-seeking customers."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Snowden leak examines gaming as a terrorist propaganda and training tool

Snowden leak examines gaming as a terrorist propaganda and training tool | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
66-page report lays out intelligence concerns both practical and fantastical.
Artur Alves's insight:

"The latest document dump from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden is getting a lot of deserved attention for revelations that international security agencies are taking steps to monitor communications inside online games. But those leaked documents also include an in-depth report on the potential for games to be used as recruitment, training, and propaganda tools by extremist organizations.

Security contractor SAIC produced the 66-page report "Games: A look at emerging trends, users, threats and opportunities in influence activities" in early 2007, and the document gives a rare window into how the US intelligence community views interactive games as a potential tool to be used by foreign actors. While parts of the report seem pretty realistic about gaming's potential use as a propaganda and planning tool, other sections provide a more fantastical take on how video games can be used as potential weapons by America's enemies."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

ORG Zine | Privacy and anonymity: necessary requirements for free speech?

ORG Zine | Privacy and anonymity: necessary requirements for free speech? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

"In the face of mass surveillance, technology that increases the protection of privacy is under a significant threat from those with an interest in restricting its use; we must fight to ensure that this does not happen. Instead of pitting privacy and freedom of expression against each other, as has been the case for so long, we must embrace the principles contained within both of these fundamental rights to enable the protection of all of us, lest we lose them completely."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Snowden leaks open up the great question of our age | Index on Censorship

Snowden leaks open up the great question of our age | Index on Censorship | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

"Edward Snowden’s leaks have exposed an ideological chasm between the partisans of free information and liberty and the guardians of state security. They have also asked demanding questions of the public at large: when does intelligence gathering become an unwarranted intrusion into private lives? Is the first responsibility of an intelligence agent to the country he serves or to a — self defined — greater good? Can we have a free society without people who do dirty work like spying on our emails?"

more...
No comment yet.