genome editing
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by miao cui
Scoop.it!

Cell Reports - Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

Cell Reports - Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System | genome editing | Scoop.it

Bassett et al., 2013

Summary

Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations of any gene in Drosophila melanogaster through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated). We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at least a 10-fold improvement in efficiency over previously published reports, enabling wider application of this technique. We also describe a simple and highly sensitive method of detecting mutations in the target gene by high-resolution melt analysis and discuss how the new technology enables the study of gene function.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by miao cui from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system

Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system | genome editing | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
more...
Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, June 13, 2013 7:01 PM

by
+David Bikard  Wenyan Jiang, Poulami Samai, Ann Hochschild, Feng Zhang and Luciano A. Marraffini

"The ability to artificially control transcription is essential both to the study of gene function and to the construction of synthetic gene networks with desired properties. Cas9 is an RNA-guided double-stranded DNA nuclease that participates in the CRISPR-Cas immune defense against prokaryotic viruses. We describe the use of a Cas9 nuclease mutant that retains DNA-binding activity and can be engineered as a programmable transcription repressor by preventing the binding of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter sequences or as a transcription terminator by blocking the running RNAP. In addition, a fusion between the omega subunit of the RNAP and a Cas9 nuclease mutant directed to bind upstream promoter regions can achieve programmable transcription activation. The simple and efficient modulation of gene expression achieved by this technology is a useful asset for the study of gene networks and for the development of synthetic biology and biotechnological applications.>>"


http://bit.ly/16k79xv

Clem Stanyon's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:31 AM

This isn't quite "genome engineering," but could readily fall into the category of "epigenome engineering", which is of particular interest to anyone looking into the basis of obesity, for example, or any other epi-genetic contidition. Such conditions are established by the environment, some duing gestation, some by early or recent exposure to dietary or other environmental factors.

Clem Stanyon's comment, June 17, 2013 5:32 AM
And here's a site that might contain more on the subject of epigenomic engineering:
http://epigenie.com/engineering-epigenomes-with-crispr-cas/