General Marketing
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Luisa Agante
Scoop.it!

Are Celebrity Endorsements a Viable Marketing Option? | Marketing Technology

Are Celebrity Endorsements a Viable Marketing Option? | Marketing Technology | General Marketing | Scoop.it

Do celebrity endorsements work from Britney Spears, David Beckham, Nicole Kidman Ellen Degeneres, Catherine Zeta Jones, the Kardashians, Beyonce, Rihanna, and Donald Trump?

 

Celebrity Endorsement has always been seen as a viable option for companies to promote their products. Many companies believe having their products associated with a popular celebrity will help drive sales. Consumers seem unsure of their influence with 51% stating that celebrity endorsement makes little to no difference on their purchasing decisions.

 

While the ROI on many marketing techniques is measureable – ROI on celebrity endorsements can be more difficult to quantify. There are many potential benefits associated with celebrity endorsements but there are also many potential pitfalls that need to be monitored carefully.

 

These pitfalls are created when you rely solely on one celebrity to promote your product. The reputation of your company is potentially in the hands of one person whose image can change overnight as a result of some celebrity scandal. Is it really worth running this risk?

 

As a result of this, the success of celebrity endorsements vary greatly and it really is a case of some working and others not. The importance of choosing an appropriate celebrity is paramount to minimizing the risk of negative publicity for your company. It is worth keeping in mind that the risks associated with celebrity endorsement can never be nullified completely, and reacting to the negative impact of celebrity endorsement will need to be dealt with carefully.

This infographic from Sign A Rama Toronto provides you with the statistics on how influential celebrity endorsement really is, as well as the stories behind the successful and unsuccessful celebrity endorsements throughout the years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luisa Agante
Scoop.it!

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | General Marketing | Scoop.it

Brand messaging has long permeated our culture. In the 1960s, American girls grew up believing that "blondes have more fun" and if you "give her a Hoover, you give her the best."

 

Mad Men-era ads promoting lotions and dishwashing liquids extolled the terror of turning 30. Ladies, your hands and face will dry up like a crustacean if you do not moisturize constantly. In the words of an old lotion ad, "Would you want to hold hands with a lobster?"

 

While a lot of progress has been made in the last 50 years, sexism and ageism obviously haven't disappeared from advertising. A woman, regardless of color, is often portrayed in limited capacities. She's young mommy calmly strapping her kid into a minivan or she's the mom with a Mona Lisa smile pulling out a fried, frozen chicken dish proud of her cleverness at meal problem-solving. Invariably, this includes a Martha Stewart look that has sustained for 25 years: blue work shirts and khakis. 
 
If a woman is over 30, she is plopped on a couch chatting about her intestinal bacteria with Jamie Lee Curtis or doling out sage cleaning tips. If she's under 30, she's the large breasted, slim-hipped "up for anything" sexpot who paaarrrties with a cold round of brew. This is the same woman who, upon turning 45, becomes the patient, yet loving "up for anything" spouse of her tired, irritable, cannot get anything up, 50-plus partner of erectile dysfunction prescription drug ads. And all of these white gals do yoga!

more...
Sophie Bloomfield's curator insight, August 12, 2014 9:33 PM

These brands have made a bold move by confronting stereotypes. Not only do I applaud them from an ethical viewpoint, but it's also interesting to see that these risky ads have sparked a lot of social conversation about their brands; both good and bad. Is any attention good attention?

Scooped by Luisa Agante
Scoop.it!

Channel Migration - The road to growth has many lanes | IRI Reports content from Supermarket News

Channel Migration - The road to growth has many lanes | IRI Reports content from Supermarket News | General Marketing | Scoop.it

IRI's Times & Trends highlights new developments and critical events across all major CPG categories and channels, providing powerful benchmarking data to help guide your strategic decisions. To provide a framework for protecting and growing share of the nearly $737 billion omni-channel CPG world, IRI conducted a granular analysis of consumers’ evolving path to purchase and its impact on existing and emerging channel trends.

In brief

 

Economic conditions, demographic changes, consumer behavior and technology innovations…during the past decade, these forces converged to set off cataclysmic changes in the consumer packaged goods (CPG) industry. They spawned a consumer marketplace that demands and is adept at finding value. They have supported growth of less traditional grocery channels, such as drug, as well as emerging channels, such as value operators and the Internet. And the influence that Internet-based media, specifically, has had on consumers’ path to purchase is simply profound. Ultimately, all of these forces have combined to forever change consumer engagement and the CPG shopping journey—and the evolution is far from over.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luisa Agante
Scoop.it!

Meet Generation Z: Marketing’s Next Big Audience [Infographic]

Meet Generation Z: Marketing’s Next Big Audience [Infographic] | General Marketing | Scoop.it

If you’re like most marketers, you’re already clued into the “Millennial” generation — as the children of the Baby Boom, these 20-to-37-year-olds have been called “the most researched generation in history.” But time marches on, and there’s a new generation in town. Generation Z might still be under the legal drinking age (in the US, at least), but they’re rapidly coming into their own — in terms of influence, consumption, and spending power.

Already, Generation Z has distinguished itself from Millennials in very significant ways — from their deepest aspirations to their preferences on social networks. And like all new generations, their behaviors will soon be shaping the status quo. Our new infographic explores Generation Z’s view of the world — and how your company can reach them.

more...