Gender and Crime
8.0K views | +9 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Gender and Crime
Scoop.it!

Victims to have greater say on Restorative Justice | Scoop News

Victims to have greater say on Restorative Justice | Scoop News | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Restorative Justice Aotearoa welcomes the implementation of the changes to the Sentencing Act that will be implemented throughout all District Courts from today.
more...
No comment yet.
Gender and Crime
How does gender impact Victimology and Criminology?
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Two sleeping Indiana teens shot dead by father who kills himself

Two sleeping Indiana teens shot dead by father who kills himself | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
An Indiana teen and his 13-year-old sister were sleeping when they were shot dead by their father who then killed himself.
Rob Duke's insight:

This week's lecture....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Alaska man linked to girl found dead in tundra admits he lied to feds

Alaska man linked to girl found dead in tundra admits he lied to feds | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
ANCHORAGE, Alaska  — An Alaska man linked to a 10-year-old girl’s death through her cellphone pleaded not guilty Friday to lying to federal authorities investigating the case. After entering h…
more...
Morgan Erickson's comment, Today, 5:42 PM
This is a really sad case. I am glad they found her though so that the family could have some closure. Something I found interesting about this case is that during the search they sent 17 FBI agents up to help search. Would this just be due to the sheer lack of resources here in Alaska??
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Alaska man tied to girl's death pleads not guilty | Alaska News | newsminer.com

Alaska man tied to girl's death pleads not guilty | Alaska News | newsminer.com | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska man linked to a 10-year-old girl's death through her cellphone pleaded not guilty Friday to lying to federal authorities investigating the case.
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:12 PM
The death of a child is always tragic, but especially 'at home' in Alaska. My heart is so broken for her family, who must have maintained hope that she would be found alive during the week of searching. I hope that the details surrounding her death finally come to light for prosecution, though I think that many of those details should be withheld from the public. This family has been through so much, and will continue to be put through the ringer during future legal proceedings, and I think respecting the privacy of both Ashley's memory and her family is the right thing to do. I hope that they find peace.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Ireland: Abortions will be cost-free for women, official says

Ireland: Abortions will be cost-free for women, official says | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Ireland will have a law in place allowing for legal abortions, and that process will be cost-free for women.
more...
Sydney Castorina's comment, September 22, 8:49 PM
- I find it interesting that by removing an amendment that protected the rights of unborn children brought harmony in regard to this issue. What I am more interested to know is what happens in criminal cases where a woman carrying an unborn child is killed.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Arrest made in fatal stabbing of jogger in Washington, DC: Police

Arrest made in fatal stabbing of jogger in Washington, DC: Police | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A suspect has been arrested in the fatal stabbing of a woman who was jogging in a trendy neighborhood just a few miles from the White House.
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:29 PM
The number of women killed this year while jogging, golfing, or exercising in 'safe neighborhoods' is honestly horrifying. These used to be the stories that parents warned kids about, but were essentially unheard of in actuality, but it seems that every other week another young woman, completely uninvolved with their attackers or any criminal scene, are being murdered on streets. It certainly begs the question of why these attacks are becoming so common; are the attackers mentally unstable? Has crime risen so much that these individuals feel 'comfortable' killing in the open?
Rob Duke's comment, September 22, 1:35 PM
Yes, exactly. Later we're going to talk about how the "built space" is gendered. In other words, it's built with men in mind and it forgets the security needs of women in a paternalistic society. Having well lit streets with buildings that appear (and do) have eyes providing natural surveillance from windows, with public spaces that encourage people to come out of their homes and socialize--all these are needed. How do you do this? First, code-based regulations that require design elements. Second, working with the local banking community to show them that people really like living in places that have good jobs/housing mix right in the neighborhood, which provides a strong tax-base to support upkeep of the facilities. This is an entire school of thought in the urban planning field called Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Ex-Doctor Sentenced to Death for Revenge Killing of 4 People in Nebraska - Campus Safety

Ex-Doctor Sentenced to Death for Revenge Killing of 4 People in Nebraska - Campus Safety | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A former doctor was sentenced to death on Friday by a three-judge panel in Nebraska after being convicted of murdering four people in two separate incidents.

Anthony Garcia, 45, was found guilty in the attacks that took place five years apart from each other, reports AP.

The murders were Garcia’s revenge on two doctors — William Hunter and Roger Brumback — for firing Garcia from his residency program at Creighton University of Medicine in Omaha, Neb., in 2001. Prosecutors say Garcia blamed the doctors for his firing, as well as for him being unable to get accepted into other programs or get his medical license approved in other states.

In 2008, Garcia entered the Hunter home in Omaha where he fatally stabbed their 11-year-old son, Thomas. He also killed the family’s housekeeper Shirlee Sherman by stabbing her to death.

Police were unable to find any suspects for the murders and the case went unsolved for years.
more...
Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, September 21, 5:54 AM

Iif taking revenge against anyone that wronged you made you and unfit Parent, Guardian or Caretaker would you r child or children be removed from your custoxy.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

What We Know About Victims Of Sexual Assault In America

What We Know About Victims Of Sexual Assault In America | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
In 2017, dozens of women, as well as several men, made claims of sexual misconduct against powerful men in Hollywood, the media, the tech industry, and government. But sexual assault is a pervasive phenomenon, and these high-profile revelations barely scratched the surface. The National Crime Victimization Survey, released last month, estimates that people in the U.S. experienced over 320,000 incidents of rape and sexual assault in 2016.1 That works out to 1.2 such assaults per 1,000 people age 12 or older.

The annual household survey, conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics,2 captures data on a number of crimes, including rape and sexual assault, that respondents experienced during the previous six months. It tends to capture much more information than sources like police statistics, since many crimes are never reported to the police. The survey helps us understand who these victims are and how they respond to being attacked.3
Rob Duke's insight:

These are the ones that get reported.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Doctor Grant Robicheaux and girlfriend, Cerissa Riley, charged with drugging and sexually assaulting women - CBS News

Doctor Grant Robicheaux and girlfriend, Cerissa Riley, charged with drugging and sexually assaulting women - CBS News | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Prosecutors say Grant Robicheaux's charm and clean-cut appearance allowed the surgeon to take advantage of unsuspecting women -- and there could be many more victims
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:07 PM
This is heinous and horrifying to begin with, but I find it especially more so due to the involvement of the doctor's girlfriend. In a world where sexual assault is so prevalent, typically male on female, it is incredibly discouraging that women would help to facilitate such a horrifying act against another woman.
Rosalie Westfall's comment, September 22, 5:16 PM
Horrifying news. I read this morning that twelve more women had stepped forward about these crimes. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/22/us/grant-robicheaux-cerissa-attacks.html
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Rosie Batty: coroner is right about child protection and police systems | Australia news | The Guardian

Rosie Batty: coroner is right about child protection and police systems | Australia news | The Guardian | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Batty responds to the findings handed down in the inquest into the murder of her son, Luke, saying perpetrators of domestic violence had to be held to account
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Pakistan: With Peaking Female Infanticide, 345 Newborn Bodies Recovered From Garbage Piles | News | teleSUR English

Pakistan: With Peaking Female Infanticide, 345 Newborn Bodies Recovered From Garbage Piles | News | teleSUR English | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Edhi Foundation, a non-profit operating in the region, found 355 dead infants from the garbage dumps across the country in 2017.
more...
Stanley Kreft's comment, September 20, 9:52 PM
The article states that these crimes are violations of Pakistans Penal Code yet there seems to be virtually no charges or cases pursuing the matter. Take the case where they stoned the infant to death there were many participants and many witness yet no charges. Another factor that makes no sense is that they find woman/girls are financial burdens who do not help support the family, yet it is them and their laws that prevent woman form working and contributing. Im surprised that their has not been a larger human rights push on this.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

El Salvador's Women Rise Up Against Gender Violence, Femicide | News | teleSUR English

El Salvador's Women Rise Up Against Gender Violence, Femicide | News | teleSUR English | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
"We demand that the state guarantee the right to a life free of violence," the protesters chanted outside the Attorney General's Office.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Scoop.it!

Why More Colleges Are Trying Restorative Justice in Sex-Assault Cases

Why More Colleges Are Trying Restorative Justice in Sex-Assault Cases | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

Campuses have used the approach to deal with a wide range of incidents of minor wrongdoing. But until recently, they’ve been reluctant to use it for sexual misconduct.

Lauren H. Adams for The Chronicle
Jordan Draper, Title IX coordinator and dean of students at the College of New Jersey: "We don’t want this to be seen as a get-out-of-jail-free card. It’s an educational opportunity."
It started, like so many dorm parties, with a group of friends drinking in someone’s room. She was pretty drunk by the time the room cleared and she and the other student were alone together. She remembers them kissing and then waking up, her clothes off, underneath him.

Talking about it later to the Title IX officer at the College of New Jersey, she doesn’t understand why she was joking around with him afterward as if it was no big deal. She wanted to tell him how uncomfortable she felt, but she didn’t know how. He lived in her dorm; they shared friends. It was her freshman year, and she was still getting to know people.

If her only choice had been to file a formal complaint and cooperate in a Title IX investigation, she might not have done it. Instead, she opted for an alternative process in which she helped draft a contract that spelled out steps to help him realize the harm he’d caused and that required him to make amends.

The College of New Jersey is among a small but growing number of institutions that now offer alternatives to trial-like investigations that critics say can be traumatic for everyone involved. The U.S. education secretary, Betsy DeVos, has indicated, through Title IX guidance issued in 2017 and then in draft regulations obtained and reported last month by The New York Times, that the Trump administration welcomes alternative ways of handling sexual-misconduct disputes.

Approaches that start with the offender admitting responsibility and agreeing to repair the harm appeal to some students who aren’t interested in seeing someone suspended or expelled. Proponents see alternative resolution agreements as a way to cut down on Title IX investigations, save colleges money, and potentially be fairer to the accused.

But skeptics worry students will feel pressured to bypass a formal investigation and will regret it later on if offenders get off too easily. And asking a student to sit down with an assailant and work out an agreement is not only unrealistic, they argue, but possibly retraumatizing.

The agreement reached by the two students at the New Jersey college didn’t require face-to-face conversations, but they did have to agree on certain stipulations. He would attend a workshop on consent and alcohol-education classes. She wanted him to know how different people’s bodies react to alcohol and how it affects their ability to consent to sex. He would view an online seminar on the neurobiology of sexual assault. The seminar, by Rebecca Campbell, a professor of psychology at Michigan State University, had helped her make sense of her confusing emotional reaction to what she later considered an assault.

Both students had a few days to view and suggest changes in the two-page agreement.

"We don’t want this to be seen as a get-out-of-jail-free card," said Jordan L. Draper, dean of students and Title IX coordinator. "It’s an educational opportunity."

Healing, Not Punishing

Draper is a proponent of what’s known as restorative justice, an umbrella term that covers a variety of interventions aimed at healing rather than assessing blame and punishing.

It’s one of several approaches the College of New Jersey offers, many of which don’t require students to meet directly with their alleged offenders.

Although the intervention Draper described for The Chronicle isn’t restorative justice in its purest sense, since the students didn’t talk directly to each other, it does share similar goals, she said.

Next week she’ll be participating in an online course about restorative justice that is being offered by Naspa: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education.

In a restorative-justice approach, the victim and the offender, and in some cases other people affected by the misconduct, participate in active and often brutally honest discussions about how someone was harmed and what it would take to heal. They also discuss steps that the offender and others can take to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

The approach has been widely used for a variety of student-disciplinary cases involving relatively minor misconduct, such as underage drinking, vandalism, and loud music. It’s also a popular alternative, in the criminal-justice system, to prison or steep fines. High schools often find it works better than suspensions to handle bullying or fighting.

But when it comes to sexual harassment or assault, few colleges have been willing to promote it as an option.

That’s largely because federal guidelines, at least until now, discourage or even prohibit the use of mediation in such cases, and restorative justice is often lumped — incorrectly, proponents argue — into the same category as mediation.

That is likely to change under new sexual-misconduct regulations that are expected to be released soon. Draft regulations would allow colleges to use an informal resolution process, instead of an investigation, to resolve some cases. Both accuser and accused would have to agree, and the college would have to determine that the case was appropriate for such an intervention.

Mary P. Koss, a veteran sexual-assault researcher and professor of public health at the University of Arizona, believes restorative justice is not only permitted under current Title IX guidelines, but is a better way to handle many complaints.

Koss, who ran a restorative-justice program for sex offenders in the county surrounding Tucson, says most colleges shy away from restorative-justice programs because officials are afraid the programs won’t comply with federal law. Obama-era guidance said mediation was not appropriate, "even on a voluntary basis," in cases involving alleged sexual assault.

In cases involving sexual harassment, the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights said that a student complainant should not have to work out the problem directly with the alleged harasser, at least without a trained counselor or mediator present.

A Search for Validation

But restorative justice isn’t the same thing as mediation, Koss argues. The main difference, she co-wrote in a paper, is "the requirement that the responsible person accepts responsibility as a precondition of participation as opposed to neutrality toward the parties."

People who opt for a restorative-justice approach "want to be validated as legitimate victims," Koss said in an interview with The Chronicle. "They don’t want to hear any more about what they were wearing, what they were drinking. They want to focus on the responsible person and what that person did."

David R. Karp, a professor of sociology and director of the Project on Restorative Justice at Skidmore College, is part of a project, called Campus Prism,that promotes the use of restorative justice for sexual and gender-based misconduct on college campuses. The approach, Karp said, "is really about gathering students in smaller circles to have dialogues about Title IX topics in a way that’s not just lecturing to them about what the rules are."

It’s more focused, he said, "on their understanding of consent, setting their own sexual standards with each other around sexual communication, around alcohol and sex, around hookup culture, all of these issues that all converge to create an unsafe environment for students."

How Colleges Are Responding

The 11 articles in this collection look at the latest guidance on the enforcement of Title IX, the federal gender-equity law that applies to sexual violence; best practices for evaluating allegations fairly; and the roles that various people on campus play in arriving at just solutions. Download the collection here.

Some colleges, including Bucknell and Rutgers Universities and the University of Notre Dame, have already updated their sexual-misconduct policies to allow for informal resolution. Rutgers has had such a policy in place since 2015, but has had only one case resolved in that way. Notre Dame has had students — a spokesman wouldn’t say how many — opt for the approach since its policy was updated over the summer, and the initial feedback has been positive.

Amy Foerster, general counsel at Bucknell, said she’s glad victims will have options beyond a Title IX investigation.

"I’ve heard enough stories of students who would have come forward if there was something available short of a formal investigative process," she said. It will be important, she added, to make sure complainants know that they have the right to pursue a formal investigation if they prefer, so they don’t feel pressured — by the college or the defendant — to bypass that process.

Since last October, nine students at the College of New Jersey have requested an alternative resolution process, and of the nine, four have completed them and two are in process, Draper said. One was not eligible because the accused person had been reported to her office before and was considered a repeat offender.

Last fall a woman came into Draper’s office saying another student had kissed her against her will and touched her inappropriately. Draper and the student sat down and drafted a proposed contract to let the alleged offender know how his actions had affected her. That evening the woman ran into the male student and told him directly what she had written in her impact statement.

"She said he was shocked," Draper said. "There was some cultural component to it. He didn’t understand that she was so uncomfortable, but it resulted in a good conversation about boundaries and consent." The next day she told Draper they could scrap the contract because the act of writing it up had empowered her to talk to him directly.

A Cathartic Approach

Brett A. Sokolow, president of Atixa, the Association of Title IX Administrators, expects more colleges will now look at alternative ways to resolve disputes, especially in light of the signals coming from DeVos. Restorative justice might be a cathartic approach that works for some victims, but it’s not the panacea some hope for, he said.

Restorative justice "lends itself to much more warm and fuzzy and kind and gentle sanctions," Sokolow said, and it’s unclear how people will feel about it if it becomes widespread.

In his consulting work, he said he often hears from middle-age women who were victimized in college and who wish they had taken stronger action.

In such cases, he said, "The fear of an 18-year-old thinking ‘I don’t want to make too much out of it’ becomes the regret of a 45-year-old saying ‘I wish I’d taken it more seriously.’"

Carly N. Mee, a lawyer who serves as interim executive director of SurvJustice, a victim-advocacy group, said restorative justice makes sense in resolving some conflicts, but not those involving sexual violence.

“It's retraumatizing for some victims to even have to walk past the perpetrator, so to put them in a room and force them to listen to their voice is inappropriate.”

"It’s retraumatizing for some victims to even have to walk past the perpetrator, so to put them in a room and force them to listen to their voice is inappropriate," she said.

Even if restorative justice is introduced as an option, a survivor of sexual abuse may feel pressured by the college, or by the alleged offender, to "make things quietly go away" by taking the restorative-justice approach, Mee said. It may be cheaper and less publicly damaging for the college than a full-blown Title IX investigation. But the result could be an inadequate penalty for the accused and a less-satisfying outcome for the accuser, she said.

Advocates of restorative justice say it could appeal to someone in a dating-violence case, for instance, when the accuser doesn’t want a former boyfriend kicked out of school, but wants to make sure he understands the impact of what he did. Mee calls that argument a "red herring."

"I represent survivors every day," she said, "and I haven’t had people ask, ‘Is there another way I can just sit down and talk it out with them?’"

Colby Bruno, a lawyer for the Victim Rights Law Center, is skeptical about restorative justice in cases involving sexual assault. Her center has helped a handful of people sign contracts in which alleged abusers agree to leave the college and not return, a restraining order helps ensure they stay away, and the college tells his friends they can’t harass her either.

"It almost never works," Bruno said. "The apology from the perpetrator is never sincere. The victim never feels safe, and the friends can never stop torturing the victim."

Draper understands the skepticism, but said the statements participating students have shared with each other speak volumes.

"I am not out to ruin your life," one wrote. "Rather, I hope you learn from this experience because no other person should have to experience what you put me through."

Marc Parry contributed reporting to this article. Katherine Mangan writes about community colleges, completion efforts, and job training, as well as other topics in daily news. Follow her on Twitter @KatherineMangan, or email her at katherine.mangan@chronicle.com.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Freddie Oversteegen, Dutch resistance fighter who killed Nazis through seduction, dies at 92

Freddie Oversteegen, Dutch resistance fighter who killed Nazis through seduction, dies at 92 | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
She was 14 when she joined the Dutch resistance, though with her long, dark hair in braids she looked at least two years younger.

When she rode her bicycle down the streets of Haarlem in North Holland, firearms hidden in a basket, Nazi officials rarely stopped to question her. When she walked through the woods, serving as a lookout or seductively leading her SS target to a secluded place, there was little indication that she carried a handgun and was preparing an execution.

Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

The Dutch resistance was widely believed to be a man’s effort in a man’s war. If women were involved, the thinking went, they were likely doing little more than handing out anti-German pamphlets or newspapers.

Yet Freddie Oversteegen and her sister Truus, two years her senior, were rare exceptions — a pair of teenage women who took up arms against Nazi occupiers and Dutch “traitors” on the outskirts of Amsterdam. With Hannie Schaft, a onetime law student with fiery red hair, they sabotaged bridges and rail lines with dynamite, shot Nazis while riding their bikes, and donned disguises to smuggle Jewish children across the country and sometimes out of concentration camps.

In perhaps their most daring act, they seduced their targets in taverns or bars, asked if they wanted to “go for a stroll” in the forest — and “liquidated” them, as Ms. Oversteegen put it, with a pull of the trigger.

“We had to do it,” she told one interviewer. “It was a necessary evil, killing those who betrayed the good people.” When asked how many people she had killed or helped kill, she demurred: “One should not ask a soldier any of that.”
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 7:57 PM
It's probably inappropriate, but 'get it, girl' is all that comes to mind. What a formidable individual who used what she had to fight a truly evil force. I do find it disheartening though that the title focused on their seduction/assassination tactics and not the overall effort, which involved sabotage with dynamite and smuggling of Jewish children. But I guess sex sells, right?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

State defends no-jail sentence in Anchorage assault case | Alaska News | newsminer.com

State defends no-jail sentence in Anchorage assault case | Alaska News | newsminer.com | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Department of Law stood by a judge's sentence that calls for no jail time for an Anchorage man who authorities say offered a woman a ride and choked her until she was unconscious.

Justin Schneider, 34, pleaded guilty to one count of felony assault in the case. A kidnapping charge was dropped as part of the plea deal.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Corey sentenced Schneider to two years with a year suspended.

Schneider also received credit for a year he served under house arrest and will serve no additional time as long as he doesn't violate the conditions of his probation.

The sentence drew public outrage Friday, the Anchorage Daily News reported .

A movement is underway calling for the ouster of the judge. An Anchorage social worker created a Facebook page calling for a "no" vote Nov. 6 on retaining Corey.

Schneider choked an Alaska Native woman and then masturbated over her unconscious body, according to charging documents. He also told the woman he would kill her if she screamed, Anchorage police detective Brett Sarber wrote in a sworn affidavit.

The victim was not present or on the phone during the hearing.

The sentence highlights a deeply flawed legal system, according to sexual assault advocates.

"This is another example of an Alaska Native woman not getting the justice they deserve," said Elizabeth Williams, a sex-assault survivor.

A number of concerned citizens told the state law department that they also believed Schneider's sentence was too lenient.

Schneider's lawyer, Anchorage Assistant District Attorney Andrew Grannik, has argued that Schneider lost his job as an air traffic controller over the charges and called that a "life sentence."

Criminal Division Director John Skidmore reviewed the case and said it was "consistent with, and reasonable, under current sentencing laws in Alaska."

Schneider did not have a criminal record prior to the incident.

Gov. Bill Walker agreed that the sentence was insufficient and said in a statement that he wants to toughen laws.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Indiana man gets 160-year prison sentence for impregnating 10-year-old girl who took stand against him - NY Daily News

A 34-year-old Indiana man was sentenced to 160 years in prison on Thursday for impregnating a 10-year-old girl, who courageously testified against him.
more...
Morgan Erickson's comment, Today, 5:49 PM
I give props to the girl for testifying against him, that takes an amazing amount of courage! I am glad they were able to charge the sicko that did it and get him locked up. I noticed that the mother was facing neglect charges. This needed to happen too because maybe if it was just once she was molested the mother might not be at fault. But this poor girl was molested at least 15 times! Hopefully she will get prosecuted too.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How Companies Keep Trying And Failing To Monetize The Handmaid's Tale

How Companies Keep Trying And Failing To Monetize The Handmaid's Tale | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The Handmaid's Tale has inspired truly questionable merchandise, but none so unnecessary as a sexy version of its main character's costume.
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:18 PM
It never fails to amaze and disappoint me when companies release something so absolutely and completely tone deaf, and then react with shock that it caused uproar. To sexualize an outfit that has *long* been associated with female oppression and sexual assault is not empowerment but a failed attempt at monetizing a moment in media. This is similar to last year's horror at a 'Sexy Anne Frank' costume; again, not empowerment, but a horrifyingly tone deaf money grab.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Maryland shooting: Woman who killed 3 was a disgruntled worker

Maryland shooting: Woman who killed 3 was a disgruntled worker | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A woman who shot dead three people at a Rite Aid distribution center in Maryland was a disgruntled employee working there temporarily, authorities said.
more...
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:23 PM
The increasing frequency of these shootings is alarming and indicative of our need to implement *some* type of further restrictions allowing individuals with diagnosed mental health issues from procuring weapons. I understand that no measure is perfect, and that too much ability to access medical records would cause different concerns regarding medical privacy, and I also continue to support the right to bear arms, but unfortunately we are becoming so accustomed to these shootings that the headlines are blips on the radar anymore.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

No jail time for man who pleaded guilty in strangling assault - KTVA 11 - The Voice of Alaska

An Anchorage man walked out of court a free man Wednesday after changing his plea in the case of a brazen midday assault.
more...
Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, September 21, 5:44 AM

Lord God have mercy. 

Rosalie Westfall's comment, September 22, 5:13 PM
I read that the assistant DA said that by losing his federal job, the offender was serving a "life sentence." The offender doesn't even have to register as a sex offender!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Man allegedly killed his parents and shot at ex-wife after getting divorce papers

Man allegedly killed his parents and shot at ex-wife after getting divorce papers | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A Pennsylvania man shot at his ex-wife after their divorce was finalized, then drove to a retirement community and killed his parents, authorities said. After hours on the run, he was found dead early Thursday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Slain golfer, suspect lived contrasting lives in Iowa city

Slain golfer, suspect lived contrasting lives in Iowa city | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The Big 12 conference champion, Barquin had dreams of making the pro tour and spent hours practicing at Coldwater Golf Links in Ames. Jobless and homeless, Richards had been living in a tent in an encampment near the course and had spoken of his desire to "rape and kill a woman," police said.

Richards was charged with stabbing Barquin to death during a random attack while she was golfing by herself in broad daylight on Monday morning. Barquin's body was found in a pond on the course near the ninth hole after fellow golfers noticed her abandoned bag and called police. Richards was arrested within hours, suffering from injuries to his face and hand after Barquin apparently tried to fight him off, investigators said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Doubts arise over whether Trump court nominee's accuser will testify | Reuters

Doubts arise over whether Trump court nominee's accuser will testify | Reuters | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A woman who has accused President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault decades ago has not yet agreed to testify at a U.S. Senate hearing set for next Monday, raising questions about whether the high-stakes public showdown will take place.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

When parents kill.

When parents kill. | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
According to a recent book entitled Mothers Who Kill Their Children,by Michelle Oberman—a professor of law at DePaul University—juries are loath to hand down murder convictions for mothers accused of killing their own children. Such juries are even more reluctant to impose draconian penalties. A 1969 study by Dr. Phillip Resnick, the "father" of maternal filicide (the murder of a child by a parent), found that while mothers convicted of murdering their children were hospitalized 68 percent of the time and imprisoned 27 percent of the time, fathers convicted of killing their children were sentenced to prison or executed 72 percent of the time and hospitalized only 14 percent of the time. More recent British studies by P.T. D'Orban support these findings. And although the United States does not have any formal equivalent to England's Infanticide Act—which codifies a sort of postpartum depression defense—American juries and judges have taken it upon themselves to excuse and treat most of these mothers for mental illness while condemning the fathers as violent criminals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'Stop Killing Us': Singer 'Miss Bolivia' Launches Campaign Against Gender-Based Violence, Femicides | News | teleSUR English

'Stop Killing Us': Singer 'Miss Bolivia' Launches Campaign Against Gender-Based Violence, Femicides | News | teleSUR English | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
"They forced me to be a slave, they forced me to give birth. We want us alive,” the singer denounces in her latest single.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

What Is Filicide? Shocking Reasons Why Parents Kill Their Own Children

What Is Filicide? Shocking Reasons Why Parents Kill Their Own Children | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

Filicide is the conscious act of killing one's own son or daughter. Despite it being a shocking thing to do, it is quite prevalent in the United States. A study by the Forensic Science International looked at over 30 years worth of filicide cases (between 1976 and 2007) and discovered that the heinous crime took place about 500 times a year in the U.S.

According to the study, the risk of filicide does not go away even when the children grow up enough to move out on their own. More than 13 percent of the victims are adults, aged 18 to 40 years, the study stated. Around 72 percent were 6 years old or even younger, and one-third of the victims were babies under the age of one.

more...
Stanley Kreft's comment, September 20, 9:41 PM
As a parent I do not know how someone could ever kill their children. I thunk that in any case there must be some form of mental illness. However, I do not think in any case where a parent kills their children they should be allowed to use it as a defense (mental illness) I also think that it should be immediate death penalty for that crime, as they would pose a huge threat to society for if they can kill their own children they could kill anyone.
Kimber A. 's comment, September 21, 8:03 PM
How tragic. I was surprised to learn that men are more likely to kill their children than women; I would have expected mothers to be the more prevalent offenders of filicide. I wonder though if that is based on the headlines involving mothers harming or murdering their own children, which seem to be more sensationalized than men doing so. I think this brings up some interesting points (especially for this class); despite men being more likely to kill their children, we tend to only see women in the news after committing such an act. Are we more shocked by women committing this crime due to our perception of maternal instincts? Or are we just desensitized to violent crimes committed by men?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FEMA chief raises spousal abuse in discussing 'frustrating' studies on hurricane deaths: 'You can’t blame spousal abuse after a disaster on anyone'

FEMA chief raises spousal abuse in discussing 'frustrating' studies on hurricane deaths: 'You can’t blame spousal abuse after a disaster on anyone' | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Brock Long on Sunday suggested that deaths in the aftermath of a natural disaster are unfairly lumped into reports assessing the death toll of hurricanes.

Long explained on NBC's "Meet the Press" that research, like the George Washington University (GWU) study conducted in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, often includes individuals who may have died from factors that occur as a byproduct of a natural disaster.

"In [Hurricane Florence], you might see more deaths indirectly occur as time goes on, because people have heart attacks due to stress, they fall off their house trying to fix their roof, they die in car crashes because they go through intersections where the stop lights weren't working," Long said.
more...
No comment yet.