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3 Marines, including gunman, dead in shooting at Marine Base Quantico

3 Marines, including gunman, dead in shooting at Marine Base Quantico | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Authorities tell Fox News a shooting incident has been reported on the base, but provided no other details. 
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Mom accused of feeding child bleach to cure autism

Mom accused of feeding child bleach to cure autism | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
An Indianapolis woman has been accused of feeding her daughter bleach to cure the child’s autism.

The unnamed wife and mother was indicted, according to police reports, for putting hydrochloric acid and a chorine-based water purifying solution into the girl’s drink, Fox 59 reported.

The Indiana child was removed from the home and the Department of Child Services were carrying out the investigations into the incident, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.
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After Judge Kozinski, Reporting Abuse in the Judiciary Is Still a Kafka-Esque Nightmare

After Judge Kozinski, Reporting Abuse in the Judiciary Is Still a Kafka-Esque Nightmare | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
What good is it to try if you don’t understand the problem first?
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Why lesbians tend to earn more than heterosexual women

Why lesbians tend to earn more than heterosexual women | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

EVERYONE knows that labour markets are not fair. Whether it is skin colour, gender or some other characteristic, minority groups tend to fare worse than the one group that, at least on average, seems to live life on the “easy” setting—white, well-educated men. For every dollar earned by a white, non-Hispanic man in full-time work, the average white woman in America earns 78 cents, and an average Hispanic woman only 56 cents. Gay men are no exception to this: even taking into account the influence of factors like education and experience, they earn less on average than straight men: around 5% less in France and Britain, and 12–16% in Canada and America. But one minority group seems to do better than others: lesbians. Why?

Research into this area is tricky; getting decent data is hard, and asking people to reveal their sexual orientation can be even harder. But studies across the world (in Canada, the US, Germany, Britain and the Netherlands) tend to uncover the same phenomenon; while gay men suffer an earnings penalty, gay women seem to earn more than straight women. In a survey of 29 studies published in January 2015, Marieka Klawitter of the University of Washington found an average earnings premium of 9% for lesbians over heterosexual women, compared with a penalty of 11% for gay men.

Establishing with certainty why this premium exists may be an impossible task, but various theories have emerged. One possibility is that lesbians might face positive discrimination, perhaps if employers expect them to be more competitive and more committed to work than their straight female colleagues. One study did find that in the (less heavily regulated) private sector, the penalty for gay men was heavier and the premium for lesbians was larger, which is consistent with this theory. Another idea is that lesbians are responding to the gender of their likely partner. They might have to work harder to plump up household income in the absence of a male partner. Or, it could be that in same-sex couples women find it easier to shrug off expectations that they will take on the bulk of child care or household chores. Same-sex couples do seem more likely to be dual-earners, even when there are children, and they also appear to share chores more equally than different-sex ones.

If this last theory is the correct one, then it could be that lesbians do in fact face discrimination in the labour market—just not as much as heterosexual women, so it shows up as a wage premium. But lesbians are not a privileged group. Qualitative studies have found that they face discrimination in hiring processes relative to heterosexual women. And although they might earn more than straight women, they still earn less than men. Poverty rates among lesbian couples are 7.9%, compared with 6.6% among different-sex couples. For boosting earnings, as in so many realms, nothing beats being a straight, white, married man.

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Brussels exhibition shows 'no outfit prevents rape'

Brussels exhibition shows 'no outfit prevents rape' | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
“The belief that clothing or what someone’s wearing ‘causes’ rape is extremely damaging for survivors,” exhibition organiser Delphine Goossens told Euronews.
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Can Google discriminate against both men and women?

Can Google discriminate against both men and women? | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
WWhat James Damore sees as evidence of anti-male sentiment, Kelli Wisuri cites as evidence of Google's bias against women.
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Missouri's Incarceration Rate Highest for Women

Missouri's Incarceration Rate Highest for Women | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
(Jefferson City) -- Missouri is confronting a number of troubling trends in its criminal justice system, including an uptick in violent crime and crowded prisons - and research shows women
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St. Paul police look to recruit more women

St. Paul police look to recruit more women | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
On Saturday, the St. Paul Police Department held its first-ever Women in Uniform recruiting event to try to attract more female officers to the force.
Rob Duke's insight:
Think about job shares.  Two employees share one full-time job.  Each work 20-24 hours per week and make about .75 hourly wage compared with full-time, but both also receive full health insurance.

This makes the job accessible for a woman who also wants to have and raise children.

**allow job share for both genders.  While fewer men will take up the option, you might be surprised...
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Canadian man held hostage with family in Afghanistan charged with sexual assault

Canadian media reports that Boyle has been charged with eight counts of assault, two counts of sexual assault, two counts of unlawful confinement, one count of uttering death threats, one count of causing someone to take a noxious substance, and one count of misleading police, with the incidents all alleged to have happened since Boyle returned to Canada, CNN reports. His attorney, Eric Granger, told CNN his client has never been in any legal trouble before, and he looks forward to "receiving the evidence and defending him against these charges."
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The thinking behind feminist economics

The thinking behind feminist economics | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Proponents of feminist economics have won many battles. GDP might still not include unpaid care, but international agencies like the United Nations increasingly rely on broader measures of progress than cash income, including health and wellbeing. Julie Nelson, a feminist economist, writes in the Journal of Economic Perspectives that “many readers may have discovered that they are already doing 'feminist economics' in some ways, although they have preferred to think of themselves as just doing 'good economics'”. Indeed, feminist economists wish they lived in a world where the label need not exist.
Rob Duke's insight:
Ah, the late Elinor Ostrom....I'd post this article just because of her contribution....
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The rise of long-distance marriage

The rise of long-distance marriage | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A higher share of men and women in their 30s and 40s live away from their partners than do those in younger and older working-age groups, according to census data. The number of separate spouses tapers off as people trade full-time employment for retirement. And the geographical patterns differ for men and women. Texas is home to the highest number of men who report an absent spouse, whereas Alaska takes the top spot for women. Nevada and New York, states with large tourism and manufacturing industries, are in the top five for both sexes.

Technological change has made living separate lives more bearable, and has thus probably contributed to long-distance marriage becoming more common. “With air travel and e-mail and FaceTime it’s a whole different ballgame,” Mr Callahan says. As communication and travel became easier and cheaper, the logistical challenges of keeping two homes and bringing up children together while physically apart dwindled. Ms Lindemann, who lived apart from her husband when she accepted a position in Nashville, is a case in point. She had no children and saw the separation as a temporary arrangement with a set end-date. Commuter couples in academia say the choice to live apart is a “professional necessity rather than financial necessity”, Ms Lindemann says.

It is no fluke that there has been a shift away from cohabitation within marriage since the financial crisis of 2008. Mark Penn, a political strategist, argues that only a minority of commuter spouses are highly educated careerists and academics like Ms Lindemann. Most have been “forced apart by economics”, he says. The timing is suggestive: as the economy went into recession many people faced a choice between a job far away and no job at all. Curiously, though, the number of long-distance marriages has not declined, even as America’s economy has recovered. An enduring shift in America’s familial norms may be under way.

Long-distance marriage is often unglamorous. Some lucky commuters are able to visit their partner every weekend. Others go months, or even years, without a reunion. Holidays can provide a brief respite. Among the usual throngs of travellers this December will be husbands and wives who are neither estranged nor living together.
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Two charged in murder of mother, kids, partner in Troy, New York

Two charged in murder of mother, kids, partner in Troy, New York | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
One of two suspects arrested in connection with the brutal murders last week of a mother, two of her children and her female partner in upstate New York was "acquainted" with one of the victims, police said Saturday.

Troy police Capt. Daniel DeWolf said investigators were still searching for a motive for the killings, and didn't specify which of the suspects — James White, 38, and Justin Mann, 24 — knew which victim or their exact relationship.

Both men, from nearby Schenectady, were apprehended Friday night and arraigned Saturday on one count of first-degree murder and four counts of second-degree murder. They pleaded not guilty.
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Cop Suspended After Calling In Sick During Hurricane Over No Childcare - Blue Lives Matter

Cop Suspended After Calling In Sick During Hurricane Over No Childcare - Blue Lives Matter | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Port St. Lucie Police Officer Erika Curry didn't have anyone to watch her children so she called in sick.
Port St. Lucie, FL - A Port St. Lucie police officer was suspended after she called in sick because she couldn't find anyone to take care of her children during Hurricane Irma.

Officer Erika Curry was suspended for 120 hours, which equals 12 days of full shifts, for violating department policy for misuse of sick benefits, absence from duty, and reporting for duty, police spokesman Master Sergeant Frank Sabol said.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is B.S.--Admin's first duty is to take care of their people.  The way to avoid this is to have your own housing and childcare center for your own personnel.  That way your personnel know their family will be taken care of.....
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The mommy track

The mommy track | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Several factors hold women back at work. Too few study science, engineering, computing or maths. Too few push hard for promotion. Some old-fashioned sexism persists, even in hip, liberal industries. But the biggest obstacle (at least in most rich countries) is children. However organised you are, it is hard to combine family responsibilities with the ultra-long working hours and the “anytime, anywhere” culture of senior corporate jobs. A McKinsey study in 2010 found that both women and men agreed: it is tough for women to climb the corporate ladder with teeth clamped around their ankles. Another McKinsey study in 2007 revealed that 54% of the senior women executives surveyed were childless compared with 29% of the men (and a third were single, nearly double the proportion of partnerless men).

Many talented, highly educated women respond by moving into less demanding fields where the hours are more flexible, such as human resources or public relations. Some go part-time or drop out of the workforce entirely. Relatively few stay in the most hard-driving jobs, such as strategy, finance, sales and operations, that provide the best path to the top.

Consider this example. Schumpeter sat down with a mergers-and-acquisitions lawyer who says that, before starting a family, she was prepared to “give blood” to meet deadlines. After the anklebiters appeared, she took a job in corporate strategy at an engineering firm in Paris. She found it infuriating. Her male colleagues wasted time during the day—taking long lunches, gossiping over café au lait—but stayed late every evening. She packed her work into fewer hours, but because she did not put in enough “face time” the firm felt she lacked commitment. She soon quit. Companies that furrow their brows wondering how to stop talented women leaving should pay heed.

Could corporate culture change? In their book “Future Work”, Alison Maitland and Peter Thomson describe how some firms give staff more flexibility. Not just women, but men and generation Y recruits, say the authors, are pushing for a saner working culture. Unilever, a consumer-goods firm, wants 55% of its senior managers to be women by 2015. To that end, it allows employees to work anywhere and for as few hours as they like, so long as they get the job done. Despite being one of the world’s most global firms, it discourages travel. McKinsey lets both female and male consultants work for as little as three days a week for proportionally less pay—and still have a shot at making partner. Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s high-profile chief operating officer, says that she has left the office at 5.30pm ever since she started a family in 2005.

Such examples are rare. For most big jobs, there is no avoiding mad hours and lots of travel. Customers do not care about your daughter’s flute recital. Putting women in the C-suite is important for firms, but not as important as making profits; for without profits a company will die. So bosses should try hard to accommodate their employees’ family responsibilities, but only in ways that do not harm the bottom line. Laurence Monnery of Egon Zehnder International, an executive-search firm, reckons that companies should stop penalising people who at some point in their careers have gone part-time.
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The release of Samsung’s boss leaves South Koreans exasperated - Get out of jail free

The release of Samsung’s boss leaves South Koreans exasperated - Get out of jail free | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

“INNOCENT if rich, guilty if poor” is a well-known adage in South Korea. It has been trending anew on social media since February 5th, when Lee Jae-yong, the vice-chairman of Samsung Electronics, was released from prison. The 49-year-old heir to South Korea’s biggest chaebol, or family-run conglomerate, had been found guilty of bribing a former president, Park Geun-hye, and her confidante, Choi Soon-sil. But Mr Lee’s initial five-year prison sentence was cut in half and suspended by an appeals court, allowing him to walk free after 353 days in jail. Other executives were also released on suspended sentences.

The ruling largely upheld Mr Lee’s insistence that he had been coerced by Ms Park into handing over the bribe. Prosecutors had charged him with paying 43bn won ($38m), which included buying horses for Ms Choi’s daughter and various donations to her sports foundations. In the end, only use of the horses was recognised as bribery, slashing the sum to 3.6bn won. Although Mr Lee had benefited generally from giving the money, the judge said, there was insufficient evidence to prove an exchange of favours. Mr Lee’s supporters say the public should consider the lack of evidence, and note that those with means have no less right to fair treatment.

Nevertheless, Korea-watchers say the sentencing looks familiar. “It’s déjà-vu,” says Chung Sun-sup of Chaebul.com, a chaebol watchdog. Five-year prison terms that are reduced by appeal courts to a roughly three-year suspended sentence are so common in chaebol cases that they are called the “3.5 rule”. Beneficiaries have included executives from Hyundai and Korean Air, and Mr Lee’s father, Lee Kun-hee, chairman of Samsung, who was incapacitated by a heart attack in 2014. In 2009 he was pardoned while serving time for evading taxes and embezzlement. (This week South Korean police said the elder Lee would face new charges of tax evasion.)

New sentencing guidelines had helped to mitigate the courts’ seeming soft spot for the chaebol in recent years, notes Choi Han-soo of the Korea Institute of Public Finance, a government-sponsored think-tank. Like many others, he had hoped that the Samsung trial would finally end the “too big to jail” mentality. The suspended sentence surprised even some legal experts. “It’s definitely a lenient ruling,” says Kim Kwang-sam of The Ssam, a South Korean law firm. Mr Choi calculates that between 2000 and 2014, 77% of chaebol plaintiffs were released on suspended sentences at the appeals stage, compared with only 64% of ordinary corporate criminals.

In the past, kinder treatment has often been justified by pointing to the economic might of the chaebol (Samsung alone accounts for one-fifth of South Korea’s exports). That defence is wearing thin. Samsung has been thriving without Mr Lee. A global semiconductor boom led it to post record profits in 2017, and last month the company announced its first stock split.

Outside the courts, the mood is unforgiving. An online petition calling for an investigation into the bias of the judge gained 212,000 signatures in three days. That would threaten the independence of the judiciary, says Mr Choi, “but you can see why citizens are angry”. They must now trust Moon Jae-in, the left-leaning president, who has vowed to stop collusion between corporates and politicians.

A final judgment is still to be made at the Supreme Court, where Mr Lee’s fate could take yet another turn. But his release leaves many convinced that the old ways persist. In 2009 the elder Lee got his pardon to help secure South Korea’s bid for the Winter Olympics. Less than a decade later, in the very week that the Games start, his son has also walked free.

 

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11 Absurdly Offensive Vintage Ads That Would Never Fly Today

11 Absurdly Offensive Vintage Ads That Would Never Fly Today | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Misogyny is still alive and well but decades ago, companies used it to get women to buy things.
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Kimber A. 's comment, February 2, 6:28 PM
I think it's so interesting that this was all perfectly normal and acceptable in decades past! It makes more sense when I consider the way my grandmother speaks; I think it sounds so backward and sexist, but I forget entirely that she was raised differently than I was, and that makes all of the difference when it comes to perspective.
Michael McColley's comment, February 12, 1:18 AM
I too know that this used to be the norm back in the day and no one would even bat an eye at these ads. Today you would never see these ads anywhere. Times have changed so much in such a small amount of time. These ads show how laid back everything was and how everyone wasn't freaking out about everything, but rather just let it play out and took it from there. I have seen a lot of these kinds of ads lately and it is so nostalgic.
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Officer Alleges Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment

Officer Alleges Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles police bloodhound handler is suing the city, alleging he suffered a backlash for reporting the alleged sexual harassment of one of his three colleagues in the unit by a supervisor wh
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How gender is (mis)represented in economics textbooks

How gender is (mis)represented in economics textbooks | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

TEXTBOOKS are often contentious. In economics, most of the debate has been about how well the models they contain describe reality. Following the presentation of new research by Betsey Stevenson and Hanna Zlotnick, both at the University of Michigan, a new controversy is likely to open up, focused on the people that authors of American textbooks use as examples. The authors found that the gender mix in these vignettes consistently misrepresents the actual proportions found in the United States.

Ms Stevenson and Ms Zlotnick pored through eight leading textbooks on the principles of economics. Every time a person was mentioned, they recorded that individual’s gender and occupation. Some of the examples were taken from history, such as a president or a mayor making a policy decision, or a famous athlete advertising a product. Others were fictional or composite, like a farmer pondering how many bushels of wheat to sell at a given price. 


All told, the researchers found more than 2,800 mentions. A striking three-quarters were of men. The most obvious reason is that nearly a third of this group were economists, a profession historically dominated by men. (Elinor Ostrom is the single woman among the 79 winners of the Nobel Prize in economics.) A large share of the remaining identifiable people mentioned are policymakers and business leaders, roles in which men have also predominated.

Nonetheless, the proportions of men found in the textbooks vastly exceed those observed in reality. For example, in America women owned 36% of businesses in 2012, and since 2008 they have comprised about a quarter of chief executives. In the books, however, just 6% of the real-world business leaders were female. A third of the policymakers appointed by Barack Obama were women, and one in five mayors in America is a woman. In the textbooks, however, women’s share in policy roles is a paltry 7% (and just as low if presidents and Federal Reserve chairs are excluded from the count). 

Even among made-up and ordinary people featured on the textbooks’ pages, men outnumber women by a large margin. In the fictitious examples, men do most of the analysis and decision-making. Accordingly, they are much more likely than women to be featured in a business or policy setting. Women, on the other hand, are more likely to be featured in education, entertainment and domestic roles.  

Such reliance on age-old gender stereotypes may help to perpetuate the wide gender imbalance found among economics graduates—as well as those in workplaces and households. One recent survey found that two-thirds of instructors who teach introductory economics think that students learn primarily by way of example. 

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When I Quit Cutting My Hair, I Learned How Men Treat Women On American Roads

When I Quit Cutting My Hair, I Learned How Men Treat Women On American Roads | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Putting my son's statement and my memory of that old incident together made everything clear: There are some men out there who, given the chance, will take a traffic incident as an excuse to harass and threaten women. Listen, I'm not what they call a "social justice warrior" searching for wrongdoings, but the evidence of my own eyes—and hair—is too strong to refute. As a woman on the American road, you really are at more risk of road rage or abuse from your fellow motorists than you would be if you were a man.
Rob Duke's insight:
Another piece of evidence to suggest that the public space is socially constructed and that genders experience it in different ways.
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Toronto police say hijab-cutting incident didn't happen

Toronto police say hijab-cutting incident didn't happen | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Toronto police are disputing an 11-year-old girl's claim that her hijab was cut by a scissors-wielding man as she walked to school last week.

Toronto Police spokesman Mark Pugash said Monday an extensive investigation was conducted and police concluded it did not happen.

The sixth-grader, her mother and her younger brother held a news conference at her school on Friday and Khawlah Noman said she was walking to school with her younger brother when a man came up behind her, pulled off her jacket hood and started cutting the bottom of her hijab. She said she turned around, screamed and the man ran away.

She also said the man returned a short time later and continued to cut her hijab from behind before he smiled and ran away.


Khawlah Noman, 11, speaks to reporters with her mother at Pauline Johnson Junior Public School, after she told police that a man cut her hijab with scissors in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on Jan. 12, 2018. Chris Helgren / Reuters
Her mother called on police to treat it as a hate crime.

The story made international headlines and drew public condemnation from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

"It's something that received, quite understandably, a lot of media and social media attention and I know it caused significant concern, as it should," Pugash said.

Pugash declined to say whether the girl acknowledged it didn't happen. He said police wouldn't take a step like this unless they were absolutely confident.

"It is absolutely unusual," Pugash said.

Ryan Bird, a spokesman for the Toronto District School Board, said officials are "very thankful" that the alleged assault did not in fact happen.

The school declined further comment.
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I was a victim of sex trafficking

I was a victim of sex trafficking | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
This story is part of a series called Craigslist Confessional. Writer Helena Bala has been meeting people via Craigslist and documenting their stories for over two years. Each story is written as it was told to her. Bala says that by listening to their stories, she hopes to bear witness to her subjects’ lives
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Killed For His Family: The Story Of A Father Who Fatally Shot A Karate Instructor That Kidnapped & Molested His Son In 1984! | Video

Killed For His Family: The Story Of A Father Who Fatally Shot A Karate Instructor That Kidnapped & Molested His Son In 1984! | Video | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Gary Plauche, is a Louisiana father who gunned down a karate instructor at an airport more than 20 years ago for kidnapping and molesting his son. Plauche, a salesman and loving father snapped after the thought about the magnitude of what happened to his son, Jody Plauche who was sexually assaulted by his karate instructor, Jeffrey Doucet. On Friday, March 16, 1984, while authorities were escorting Jeffrey Doucet through the airport in Baton Rouge, a man lifted his gun out of nowhere and shot Doucet at point blank range. The man turned out to be Gary Plauche. The judicial system exercised leniency with Gary Plauche by giving him a suspended sentence and probation. He didn’t spend one night in prison for what he had done. Posted By Persist
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Obituary: Lady Lucan was found dead on September 26th

Obituary: Lady Lucan was found dead on September 26th | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

YOU could always spot a thoroughbred. Veronica Duncan knew at once what to look for in a pony or a horse, after all those gymkhanas and point-to-points. And she could spot it in this man: the imposing height, the military moustache, the cavalry twills and tweed cap. This was John, Lord Bingham, ex-Eton and Coldstream Guards, the heir to a fortune and to the title of 7th Earl of Lucan. She was 26, still dreaming of a god, or at least the coup of marrying a peer of the realm. And there he was.

Her sister warned her off. He was a professional gambler, his parents were socialists, and he was said to be queer. Very “not so”. She didn’t care. He drove her round in his green Aston Martin, took her out in his power boat, and after a while simply carried her into his bedroom, thereby putting paid to sisterly warning number three. In a few months, they were married. Within a year she, a middle-class country girl, petite and with no confidence, was the Countess of Lucan, and her husband the most handsome man in the House of Lords.

To be a peeress of the realm was important. It did not imply the high life, though she and John did honeymoon on the Orient Express and take holidays in Gstaad and Monte Carlo. But a good bloodline imposed a code of honourable behaviour and civilised manners. It was fitting that, when she later set up a website, she put her coat of arms at the top. And quite correct, too, given her rank, that she wore a hat at the inquest into the killing of poor Mrs Sandra Rivett, her children’s nanny, who had been battered to death by her husband on November 7th 1974; after which he had turned his fury on her, and then vanished from the face of the Earth.

The story seemed to grip the world from that moment on. She preferred not to speak of it but, when asked, her memory was clear. On that evening, Mrs Rivett had offered to make her a cup of tea. It was not part of her normal duties; but, though they were on formal terms, they also chatted informally. When the tea did not arrive from the basement kitchen, she went in search. On the dark stairs, someone hit her hard on the head four times, then forced three gloved fingers down her throat, snapping “Shut up!” It was her husband.

With measured blows

Of course, she did shut up. She had done that all through their marriage. The point of being married, he said once, was that you did not have to talk to the person. He seldom did, after the first few years, except to say he was displeased with her. The Clermont Club had become his home, where he gambled his fortune away while she sat white with stress in the shadows. Nothing she could say would stop him. When she got depressed he would beat out her mad ideas with ten steady, measured blows on her bare bottom; after which they would have intercourse, and he would kiss the injuries tenderly.

She knew this was weak of her, but she always wanted to placate him, to try to do her best. How great was her relief when she bore him a son! She would also do her best when he was trying to strangle her, and she felt a metal bar beside her clotted with a great deal of her own hair. “Please don’t kill me, John,” she gasped. She did not omit the “please”. As they tried to sort themselves out, politely, in the upstairs bedroom afterwards, and to wash off the blood, she made a dash to the nearest pub and raised the alarm. Meanwhile, he fled.

There was never any doubt in her mind that he was the murderer of Mrs Rivett, and the near-murderer of her. They had been separated for over a year, and he had lost custody of the children, despite telling everyone that she was an unfit mother. He had seized them once (by court order) as they walked with the nanny in Green Park; she was sure he was stalking her, though that might have been the effect of the super-strong pills the doctors forced on her. He tried several times to commit her to the loony bin. That she did manage to refuse.

She also felt sure she had solved the mystery of his disappearance. Though he had behaved badly, he was an honourable man. Indeed, she had always hoped they could be reconciled. When he fled, apparently taking the cross-Channel ferry from Newhaven, he had therefore jumped from the boat in mid-voyage, deliberately onto the propellers, so that his remains would never be found. In that case death duties would not be immediately payable, and the children’s education could be secured.

This thought was some comfort in her old age. She spent it in the mews cottage in Belgravia where he had lived after their separation and from which he had come to kill her. His portrait in his Lords ermine still hung on the wall; the blinds were kept down. Her children were lost to her, finding it more congenial to live with her sister and refusing to think their father guilty. From 1982 they never spoke. When her younger daughter married she watched through the railings in the rain, on her way to buy a cardigan from Marks & Spencer. All her relationships had been cold.

In old age she wrote a memoir and gave a television interview, her voice cool and emphatic. Her account of the night of November 7th 1974 did not vary, except in one particular. She preferred to say that she had cried out, or simply spoken loudly, when she ran bloodied into the pub. She had not let the side down by screaming; or, if so, only with measured breaths.

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Man accused of rigging door to electrocute pregnant wife

Man accused of rigging door to electrocute pregnant wife | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A Florida man is accused of rigging the front door of a home in an attempt to electrocute his estranged pregnant wife.

In a Facebook post Friday, Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staley called the case one of the "most bizarre domestic violence cases" he's seen.

Officials said 32-year-old Michael Scott Wilson was arrested Thursday in Knoxville, Tennessee, and charged with attempted aggravated battery on a pregnant woman and grand theft of a firearm. He's being held on a $150,000 bond and will be extradited to Florida. It's unclear if he has an attorney.

The woman's father called deputies after Wilson made suspicious statements about keeping children away from the door. Deputies found the front door barricaded, with burn marks. When a deputy kicked the door, a large spark was observed.
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German police union chief slams NYE 'safe zone' for women

German police union chief slams NYE 'safe zone' for women | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A German police union boss has criticized organizers of Berlin's annual open-air New Year's Eve party for designating a special "safety area" for women, saying it suggests they aren't safe from assault elsewhere.

The comments by Rainer Wendt, who heads the right-leaning DpolG union, come amid an ongoing debate in Germany about how to tackle an increase in sexual assaults.

Wendt told the Neue Osnabruecker Zeitung daily in an interview published Saturday that establishing such a safe zone sends a "devastating message."
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What’s the best age gap in a relationship?

What’s the best age gap in a relationship? | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Some economists have wondered whether smaller age gaps between partners could have wider, societal benefits, as they might help to narrow the gender earnings gap. Because earnings rise with age, and women tend to couple with older men, relative earnings around the time of childbirth could put subtle pressure on women to drop out of work. That said, a study that compared Danish twin sisters found that the earnings of women who married older men were no different, on average, than those who married men closer to them in age.

Could a smaller age gap also make couples more likely to stay together? In 2014, the Atlantic claimed that “a five year age difference makes a couple 18 percent more likely to get divorced, compared to a couple born on or around the same year.” While the study cited – which polled American couples and ex-couples – did show an association between divorce rates and age gaps, it did not prove a causal link. Something about the kind of person who opts into a marriage with a large age gap could be driving the higher divorce rates, rather than the age gap itself. A bright young thing considering a silver fox should also take heart from a study by Britain’s Office of National Statistics. It did not find a strong link between age gaps and divorce rates in England and Wales, though there was some evidence that women marrying later than 30 who were more than ten years older than their spouse were more likely to divorce.

Common sense does suggest that a large age gap would have implications for old age. Having someone to look after you in your dotage is wise, as is avoiding widowhood. A younger, healthier partner could make sense, at least from your side of the equation. Another study by Sven Drefahl of the University of Stockholm looked at people over the age of 50 in Denmark, and found that men with younger spouses survived for longer than those with ones of a similar age. The older their spouse, the worse their survival chances, even after controlling for things like education and wealth. Again, the link might not be causal: healthy men might be particularly able both to attract younger mates and live to a ripe old age. But mysteriously, this phenomenon does not appear to apply to women, where the bigger the age gap, the worse their survival chances, regardless of whether they were younger or older. In the case of women with younger husbands, Drefahl suggested, the gender difference could be due to women being less reliant on their partner for support, and so benefiting less from the energies of a younger spouse.

What evidence there is, therefore, vindicates the choices of OKCupid’s users: women should pick men who are as close as possible in age to them, while men should look for younger women. A true economist, however, would look for better evidence, perhaps by comparing the marital bliss of random couples with varying age differences. Unfortunately for them, but luckily for the rest of us, people make their own choices – and are free to ignore silly rules of thumb.
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