Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists
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Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists
This curation is dedicated to those journalists part of the GLBT community who believe in Free Speech, especially to the extent of "I don't believe in what you say but will defend to the death your right to say it.". This especially holds true for standing up for the rights of those who would espouse death to members of the GLBT community. Glen Greenwald, a lawyer turned blogger then journalist embodies this. On one of his Salon.com articles "Free Speech and Donations"(July 30, 2012) he laudes most Liberal publications who critisize those mayors wishing to keep Chik-Fil-A out for it's anti-Gay bent. Subsequently, he chastises those Liberals on the other end applauding the mayor's decision. Looking at the article which centered on this 4 days before, attacking Rahm Emmanuel and his wish to block Chik-Fil-A, is reminiscent of the language regarding the Neo-Nazi's vs. Skokie("Wikipedia" footnote 4). This language defending the First Amendment is the safe harbor of the true Libertarian/ACLU member. In this respect Greenwald makes a great role model for those wishing to pursue Journalism in a similar bent.
Curated by Drew Miller
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Keeping Secrets: Pierre Omidyar, Glenn Greenwald and the privatization of Snowden’s leaks

Keeping Secrets: Pierre Omidyar, Glenn Greenwald and the privatization of Snowden’s leaks | Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists | Scoop.it
Who “owns” the NSA secrets leaked by Edward Snowden to reporters Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras?

Via Thomas Faltin
Drew Miller's insight:

While being disconcerted by this article it must be acknowledged, the questioning of Greenwald backing up someone who has had questionable interests.  Greenwald, however, presents a valid opposing point.  It's worth noting that Pando's arguments on books et al are debatable, considering Greenwald points out that the bread and butter for journalists are to vet and report on these things.  It's worth noting some of the ability for one to make a living can lie on exclusives.

A reverse argument can be made on a synthesis aspect.  You can have the biggest jumble of information publically available in the world and it means nothing without a quality synthesis.  The greatest aspect is the book though it can be terribly daunting.  Combing through such a trove all but the most ardent of journalists would likely give up but those who succeed...case in point, "Shock Doctrine".  I'm sure most of Naomi Klein's evidence has likely come from publically available sources.  Even if untrue, I could likely find another example.

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Does Glenn Greenwald Hate America?

Does Glenn Greenwald Hate America? | Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists | Scoop.it
The Los Angeles chapter of the Hamas-linked Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has announced that Glenn Greenwald, the far-Left journalist who publicized Edward Snowden’s information about the astonishingly broad extent of NSA electronic...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Drew Miller's insight:

This is why I can't emphasize Glen Greenwald's importance to Gay journalists enough.  For those who think they live in a sea adrift, being Gay and unapologetically supporting Free Speech, some of Glen's quoted remarks on CAIR hopefully will embolden them.
Supporting Muslim rights, despite the Homophobia some harbor, is the very essence of holding up "I don't believe in what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it.".

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Edward Snowden and Glenn Greenwald: The Men Who Leaked the NSA's Secrets | RollingStone.com

Edward Snowden and Glenn Greenwald: The Men Who Leaked the NSA's Secrets | RollingStone.com | Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists | Scoop.it

Early one morning last December, Glenn Greenwald opened his laptop, scanned through his e-mail, and made a decision that almost cost him the story of his life. A columnist and blogger with a large and devoted following, Greenwald receives hundreds of e-mails every day, many from readers who claim to have "great stuff." Occasionally these claims turn out to be credible; most of the time they're cranks. There are some that seem promising but also require serious vetting. This takes time, and Greenwald, who starts each morning deluged with messages, has almost none. "My inbox is the enemy," he told me recently.

 

And so it was that on December 1st, 2012, Greenwald received a note from a person asking for his public encryption, or PGP, key so he could send him an e-mail securely. Greenwald didn't have one, which he now acknowledges was fairly inexcusable given that he wrote almost daily about national-security issues, and had likely been on the government's radar for some time over his vocal support of Bradley Manning and WikiLeaks. "I didn't really know what PGP was," he admits. "I had no idea how to install it or how to use it." It seemed time-consuming and complicated, and Greenwald, who was working on a book about how the media control political discourse, while also writing his column for The Guardian, had more pressing things to do.

 

"It felt Anonymous-ish to me," Greenwald says. "It was this cryptic 'I and others have things you would be interested in. . . .' He never sent me neon lights – it was much more ambiguous than that."

 

So he ignored the note. Soon after, the source sent Greenwald a step-by-step tutorial on encryption. Then he sent him a video Greenwald describes as "Encryption for Journalists," which "walked me through the process like I was a complete idiot."

 

And yet, Greenwald still didn't bother learning security protocols. "The more he sent me, the more difficult it seemed," he says. "I mean, now I had to watch a fucking video . . . ?" Greenwald still had no idea who the source was, nor what he wanted to say. "It was this Catch-22: Unless he tells me something motivating, I'm not going to drop what I'm doing, and from his side, unless I drop what I'm doing and get PGP, he can't tell me anything."

 

The dance went on for a month. Finally, after trying and failing to get Greenwald's attention, the source gave up.

 

Greenwald went back to his book and his column, publishing, among other things, scathing attacks on the Obama administration's Guantánamo and drone policies. It would take until May, six months after the anonymous stranger reached out, before Greenwald would hear from him again, through a friend, the documentarian Laura Poitras, whom the source had contacted, suggesting she and Greenwald form a partnership. In June, the three would meet face to face, in a Hong Kong hotel room, where Edward Snowden, the mysterious source, would hand over many thousands of top-secret documents: a mother lode laying bare the architecture of the national-security state. It was the "most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the U.S. intelligence community," as former CIA deputy director Michael Morell said, exposing the seemingly limitless reach of the National Security Agency, and sparking a global debate on the use of surveillance – ostensibly to fight terrorism – versus the individual right to privacy. And its disclosure was also a triumph for Greenwald's unique brand of journalism.

 

Greenwald is a former litigator whose messianic defense of civil liberties has made him a hero of left-libertarian circles, though he has alienated elites across the political spectrum. Famously combative, he "lives to piss people off," as one colleague says. And in the past eight years he has done an excellent job: taking on Presidents Bush and Obama, Congress, the Democratic Party, the Tea Party, the Republicans, the "liberal establishment" and, notably, the mainstream media, which he accuses – often while being interviewed by those same mainstream, liberal-establishment journalists – of cozying up to power. "I crave the hatred of those people," Greenwald says about the small, somewhat incestuous community of Beltway pundits, government officials, think-tank experts and other opinion-makers he targets routinely. "If you're not provoking that reaction in people, you're not provoking or challenging anyone, which means you're pointless."

 

This perspective has earned Greenwald tremendous support, especially among young, idealistic readers hungry for an uncompromised voice. "There are few writers out there who are as passionate about communicating uncomfortable truths," Snowden, who was one of Greenwald's longtime readers, tells me in an e-mail. "Glenn tells the truth no matter the cost, and that matters."

 

The same, of course, could be said of Snowden, who, from the moment he revealed himself as the source of the leaks, has baffled the mainstream critics who've tried to make sense of him. "The founders did not create the United States so that some solitary 29-year-old could make unilateral decisions about what should be exposed," wrote New York Times columnist David Brooks, who held up Snowden as one of "an apparently growing share of young men in their 20s who are living technological existences in the fuzzy land between their childhood institutions and adult family commitments."

 

To the likes of Brooks, Snowden was a disconcerting mystery; Glenn Greenwald, though, got him right away. "He had no power, no prestige, he grew up in a lower-middle-class family, totally obscure, totally ordinary," Greenwald says. "He didn't even have a high school diploma. But he was going to change the world – and I knew that." And, Greenwald also believed, so would he. "In all kinds of ways, my whole life has been in preparation for this moment," he says. 


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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eBay Founder to Back New News Venture With Glenn Greenwald

eBay Founder to Back New News Venture With Glenn Greenwald | Gay Absolutist Freedom Of Speech Journalists | Scoop.it
Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist, commentator and lawyer who worked with Edward Snowden to publish stunning details about the National Security Agency's massive online surveillance program earlier this year, announced on Tuesday that he is...

Via Thomas Faltin
Drew Miller's insight:

Significant for it's relevance to Greenwald's absolute search for truth and his undying belief in free speech.  This media outlet and it's pundits display an unwavering drive to dig up an dirt out there, especially on anything disconcerting the United States may be doing.

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