Gardens to Gander
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Compost Top-Dressing: A Nurturing Blanket for Your Lawn and Garden | Safelawns Daily Post and Q&A Blog

Compost Top-Dressing: A Nurturing Blanket for Your Lawn and Garden | Safelawns Daily Post and Q&A Blog | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
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Improve Soil with Mycorrhizal Fungi: Organic Gardening

Improve Soil with Mycorrhizal Fungi: Organic Gardening | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Mycorrhizal fungi may be the key ingredient to improving soil health. You can improve its success in your garden with simple steps, such as rotating crops.
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This was my favorite display at the SF Garden Show this year...

This was my favorite display at the SF Garden Show this year... | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
There was so much inspiration from the 2012 San Francisco Garden Show that I am still sifting through it all weeks later.
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You Are What You Eat | Shoot or Pass the Pistil

You Are What You Eat | Shoot or Pass the Pistil | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Methyl bromide has been the fumigant of choice for conventional US strawberry growers.
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Considering citrus during the winter

Considering citrus during the winter | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Considering citrus during the winterNow and then we Master Gardeners hear from a homeowner worried about her citrus tree because its leaves are yellowing.
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Common Ground: The Ocean, Lakes, Rivers & Streams | Safelawns Daily Post and Q&A Blog

Common Ground: The Ocean, Lakes, Rivers & Streams | Safelawns Daily Post and Q&A Blog | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
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Roundup has no place in home garden care

Roundup has no place in home garden care | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Q: In a recent column (Nov. 13) you answered a reader who was reluctant to use the herbicide Roundup to combat Japanese anemone. Why? Is it poisonous? I thought it was a salt that got into the plant root and destroyed...
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Drumroll Please: 2011′s Garden Trend Award Goes To. . . | North Coast Gardening

Drumroll Please: 2011′s Garden Trend Award Goes To. . . | North Coast Gardening | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Succulents! Forget the “Year of the Protestor“, 2011 was the Year of the Succulent. From green roofs to succulent spheres, these low-maintenance, year-round plants have been everywhere.
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Mr. Ed on "under your trees"

April showers bring May flowers and they are lovely to look at, but should never be planted under a tree. Probably because garden magazines show trees with lawns planted up to the trunk or with a 3 to 4 foot flower border around the base, we are led to believe this is a proper landscape technique. Perhaps in Michigan or Pennsylvania where it rains once or twice a week throughout the summer the trees will not suffer from such treatment; but, in the Bay Area, this technique does more harm than good.

Under ideal conditions, nothing should be planted between the drip line and the trunk of a tree. No lawn, no flowers, no shrubs, no nothing. As a tree grows, the feeder roots also grow and stay about even or just beyond the tree’s drip line. The roots closest to the trunk get thicker and heavier and act mainly to support the tree. Therefore, the area around the feeder roots must be kept clear to absorb the water and nutrients the tree needs for proper growth. In a landscape, the design can be made to accommodate the tree’s growth. Bare earth under the tree should be mulched with a suitable organic material such as 1 inch of fir bark or redwood compost. Newly planted trees from 5 or 15 gallon cans should be irrigated once a week for 20 to 30 minutes with a slowly running hose or equivalent. Under no circumstances should the lawn sprinkler be relied upon to irrigate trees. Because lawn water goes down 3 to 4 inches and the trees need water down to 12 to 18 inches. A berm built at the tree’s drip line will help to hold the water. By the time the tree is mature it will probably require irrigation only once a month.

The trees most difficult to irrigate are those planted in that strip between the sidewalk and street curb. All the same rules apply. Flooding the area is probably the best way to irrigate. The soil under the sidewalk and street will hold moisture from winter rain until almost June and some feeder roots will find their way out there. A small tree will be most suitable for this location or perhaps one or several shrubs will be more appropriate.

Finally, we have seen people standing next to their tree holding a hose with water running onto the ground next to the trunk of the tree. This is a waste of time and water. It may be therapeutic for the hose holder but is of no benefit to the tree. The water must go to the feeder roots near the drip line.

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Guest Post: Want Happy Plants? Feed the Microbes! | North Coast Gardening

Guest Post: Want Happy Plants? Feed the Microbes! | North Coast Gardening | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Five Ways To Improve The Health And Diversity Of Your Soil Food Web: A guest post by Phil Nauta, The Smiling Gardener.
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The Trees of San Carlos: What You Can and Can’t Do With Them. | The White Oaks Blog

The Trees of San Carlos: What You Can and Can’t Do With Them. | The White Oaks Blog | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
Not All Trees Are Created Equal. Trees are a big part of the landscape and the personality of San Carlos.  There’s a whole neighborhood and blog named after one particular species of oak tree, but for some reason that name seems to escape me at the...
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Garden Design Reality Check: You live in a house, not a magazine...

Garden Design Reality Check: You live in a house, not a magazine... | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it

Reality Check #1: You live in a house, not a magazine...

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Gardening trends for 2012

Gardening trends for 2012 | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it
What’s on the horizon for gardeners in 2012? Here are 10 plant, design and ideology trends to watch out for this year.
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A Verdant Life: Gardening in the New Year

A Verdant Life: Gardening in the New Year | Gardens to Gander | Scoop.it

Excellent "what to do in the garden this month" tips.

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