Gardening Life
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Gardening Life
Gardening for beginners, enthusiasts and pros . . . If you enjoy this, you will love the blog: http://gardensinspired.blogspot.com
Curated by Debra Anchors
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Asiatic Garden Beetle

Asiatic Garden Beetle | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

The adult beetles are small, velvety and cinnamon brown in color. Adults emerge from the soil from mid-July to mid-August and feed on the host plant. These foliage feeders are active at night and return to the soil during the day. Unlike Japanese beetles, Asiatic garden beetles do not skeletonize leaves; instead, they strip, shred, and notch the foliage.

 

Read more about this pest, here: http://goo.gl/A9Rul

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Let the sun clean your soil

Let the sun clean your soil | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Soil solarization is an effective nonchemical way to control weeds and many diseases in planting beds. You trap solar heat under plastic sheets; the soil bakes, killing weeds and disease organisms.

 

Read the "how-to", here:  http://goo.gl/piwFE

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Herbal sachet shortcut

Herbal sachet shortcut | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

"As easy as sewing sachet pillows may be, the likelihood of me dragging out the sewing machine anytime soon ranks up there with me waxing the car and organizing my storage unit." -The Soil Toil

 

The shortcut to sewing a sachet can be found, here: http://goo.gl/YyVSj

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Cities could save bees

Cities could save bees | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Flowers on the windowsill and hanging baskets on lamp posts could prove to be the saviour of bees, according to new research that suggests they are better off in cities than the countryside.

 

Prof Jane Memmott, an ecologist, believes bees in the city have a more diverse diet of pollen and nectar from all the different green spaces around homes and offices, that gardeners keep blooming all year round.

 

Read more: http://goo.gl/hKDz4

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11 ways to support tomato vines

11 ways to support tomato vines | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Your growing tomato plants need plenty of support. Keep them off the ground with these creative and attractive options.

 

One of the ideas within this article - Sturdy chain link fencing makes a great support for tomato vines. Weave stems through the openings in the fence when plants are young, and soon they'll begin winding their own way upward. Use an existing fence, or build a row of fence right in your garden for your tomatoes.

 

Read about the other 10 suggested ways to support tomato vines, here:  http://goo.gl/PN4n7

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It's Summer! Kick-up your heels!

It's Summer! Kick-up your heels! | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

And then join our gardening community on Facebook by liking us, here:  http://on.fb.me/IvqKxV

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Tree tunnel at Rivne, Ukraine

Tree tunnel at Rivne, Ukraine | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Wouldn't this be a lovely place to visit on a hot summer day? Gorgeous!

 

Tree tunnel at Rivne, Ukraine - found on Pinterest via TheFancy.com

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The basics of herbs

The basics of herbs | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Click-through to this handy chart which explains 11 of the most basic herbs used in cooking and how to use them. . . 

 

Find the complete chart, here:  http://goo.gl/sCA5K

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Gardening Tips - Maintenance Mode

Gardening Tips - Maintenance Mode | Gardening Life | Scoop.it
Everything is green and blooming, Now what?

 

Now that all the plants are in the ground and summer is well under way with everything growing lush very quickly, here are a few notes to keep in mind:  http://goo.gl/Dkmp9

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On the Fly – Gardening for the Birds

On the Fly – Gardening for the Birds | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Besides food, birds use plants as a refuge and as nesting sites. Those towhees need some open ground to scrounge on, but they also need a place to flee from cats and other predators. Orioles like to use milkweed fiber in their nests, a thrasher will rarely leave the hard chaparral it calls home, and of course oaks, pines, cottonwoods, and all the other trees—native and nonnative—in our neighborhoods harbor entire avian universes.

 

Read more about suggested plantings which will feed the birds: http://goo.gl/LbEJZ

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June is National Rose Month.

June is National Rose Month. | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Did you know that in 1986 President Ronald Reagan signed a resolution making the rose the national floral emblem at a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden?

 

Read more, here:  http://goo.gl/8v5la

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The Buzzy Life of a Bumble bee

The Buzzy Life of a Bumble bee | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

A gardener can help bumblebees by planting pollen-producing flowers and by allowing a patch of early dandelions to grow in a field or under a hedge as a food source for the young queens to find. As spring begins to warm, hopefully you will see the queen bumblebees flying industriously and visiting the earliest flowers. The large bees move slowly, as they search for sources of nectar and pollen to convert into honey and wax to feed their hatching larva.

 

Find out more about the fascinating life of a bumblebee by reading the entire article, here: http://bit.ly/LfQcKB

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I hope you will sit back and enjoy my magazine. Please share it with friends on your favorite social media network - many thanks! -Debra

I hope you will sit back and enjoy my magazine. Please share it with friends on your favorite social media network - many thanks! -Debra | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Thank you for visiting; please return often.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, July 28, 2015 7:33 PM

Interesting???

Eric Larson's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:53 PM

Good ideas.

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Budget patchwork patio

Budget patchwork patio | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Dig it, stain it, and it's done in a weekend.

 

Concrete pavers seemed to be the answer ― they are readily available and inexpensive (less than $1 each) at home improvement stores ― but their color range is limited to gray and ruddy brown. My husband, Oliver Kreidemann, and I kept saying, "If only they came in better colors."

 

Read about how to create the outdoor "area rug", here: http://goo.gl/jAIDC

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The hidden beauty of pollination

Pollination: it's vital to life on Earth, but largely unseen by the human eye. Filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg shows us the intricate world of pollen and pollinators with gorgeous high-speed images from his film "Wings of Life," inspired by the vanishing of one of nature's primary pollinators, the honeybee.

 

If you have children or students to share this with, this film clip will leave them with a lasting impression. This incredible film is well worth the wait through the 3-minute introduction.  Enjoy, and please share it with others. 

 

 

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Find a baby bird? Here's what to do -

Find a baby bird? Here's what to do  - | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Young birds often leave their nests before they're able to fly. "They usually spread out along the branch of a tree and call for their parents to bring food to them." Ron Stewart said.

 

While the birds are spread along the branch, it's not uncommon for a strong wind to blow the birds off the branch and for people to find them on the ground.

 

If you find a baby bird on the ground, what should you do with it? http://goo.gl/15ngU

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Touch Me Nots--Plants To Avoid

Touch Me Nots--Plants To Avoid | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

"Let's face it. All of us who work in our gardens or enjoy hikes out in the woods and meadows have touched a plant we shouldn't have and had to deal with the consequences. For me, those consequences are usually itchy."  -Maggie Lawrence

 

Read more from the article, here:  http://goo.gl/bXhsG

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Gardening in a small space – solutions

Gardening in a small space – solutions | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Helpful tips on how to maximize your gardening space.

 

Read more, here:  http://bit.ly/KMthp2

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Velcro flowers help bees on windy day

Velcro flowers help bees on windy day | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

News story about latest research by scientists that reveals how bees and other insects manage to hold on to flowers on windy days.

 

It's thought the bees use the gaps between the cells as footholds in blustery conditions, locking their claws into them in a similar way to Velcro fabric fasteners, and helping them hold on to the flowers.

 

Read the article, here: http://goo.gl/MzZBh

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Create wildlife habitats

Create wildlife habitats | Gardening Life | Scoop.it
Maryland natural resources officials and the National Wildlife Federation are pushing for more residents to slow the loss of wildlife habitats.

 

Those who are serious about creating backyard habitats don't need to go to the extreme. All that's needed are some native plants -- they can even be in pots -- and some water and food sources. The whole habitat can be completed in a 10-foot-by-10-foot space or even on a patio, he said. Make sure to invest in some books, he suggested, so that you can identify the different species of birds and insects.

 

More:  http://goo.gl/00gQz

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Anne-Marie Summers's curator insight, July 10, 2016 7:29 AM
A small move towards a possible solution
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Welcoming the Butterflies

Welcoming the Butterflies | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Welcoming the Butterflies - One of the most wonderful rewards from a garden full of color is the visits by the butterflies. It is easy to make your garden hospitable to these wonderful winged creatures.

 

Adult butterflies live on the sweet flavored nectar found in flowers. Since butterflies are near-sighted, large sweeps of flowers half attract them. They suck the nectar with their mouths which are straw-like, so they are partial to long tubular flowers found on butterfly bushes, lantana, pentas, and butterfly weed. They will also visit pansies, marigolds, and impatiens. Flowers such as verbena and daisies are good because they have compound flowers which provide many nectar containers for sipping. Butterflies have a great sense of smell which guides them to the flowers with rich nectar. Humans and butterflies are attracted to flowers that smell sweet.

 

Read more:  http://goo.gl/xfmfO

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Sow seeds: Start flowers yourself to add instant color to any garden

Sow seeds: Start flowers yourself to add instant color to any garden | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

There’s no better way to get kids involved in gardening than to have them plant seeds which grow into giants that tower over them in a few months.


Sunflowers fill the bill.


There are more than 60 species of sunflowers ranging from perennials to towering annuals such as Mammoth, which grows 12 to 15 feet tall. Seed heads measure two-feet across and are a favorite attraction for birds and bees.They’ve been a source of food for Native Americans for more than 3,000 years.

 

More:  http://goo.gl/ULUEC

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Plant a tree for its bark

Plant a tree for its bark | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

Gardeners value bark for its fascinating good looks (and sometimes for its usefulness as mulch) than for its economic potential. Thin or thick, paper-like or deeply textured, bark can be relied on to enliven landscapes even in the dead of winter. Snow clings to bark and sunshine bounces off its richly textured surface. Bark colors vary widely, with lichens enhancing the composition as the years go by. Because bark’s inner layer delivers life-sustaining nutrients and oxygen, it pays to protect young trees. Under-plantings of ground covers, ferns and hostas will keep lawn mowers and foot traffic at a safe distance.

 

Find suggestions for trees with interesting bark, here: http://bit.ly/xb3yLb

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Could your tree be planted too deeply?

Could your tree be planted too deeply? | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

How do you know if your tree is planted too deeply? 

 

Find out here:  http://goo.gl/GJd4r

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Dirt, Seeds, Gardening With Kids!

Dirt, Seeds, Gardening With Kids! | Gardening Life | Scoop.it

The National Gardening Association says that the act of gardening benefits kids’ health, well-being, and attitude towards learning. This stress reducing activity also builds self-esteem and creativity while fostering bonds with nature and family.

 

Read more, here:  http://goo.gl/oBrsa

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