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This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems

This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Google's AutoML project, designed to make AI build other AIs, has now developed a computer vision system that vastly outperforms state-of-the-art-models.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, January 3, 9:05 AM

When AI can create AI children, and those children on their turn are able to create children, we only need 2 AIs creating 2 children each second to be completely overtaken by AIs before we even realize it...

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Predictions: AI, IoT, and blockchain will dominate headlines in 2018

Predictions: AI, IoT, and blockchain will dominate headlines in 2018 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Information technology in 2018 is expected to be more exciting as technologies that were just a concept or in the trial stages in the past years will become a reality, according to technology companies.

Commentaries submitted by technology companies had five common predictions related to artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, blockchain, cloud computing, and IT security.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

AI will get smarter and more practical in 2018

2018 will see a growth in analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) across the board as companies see real returns on their investments. According to IDC, revenue growth from information-based products will double the rest of the product and services portfolio for a third of Fortune 500 companies by the end of 2017.

“AI became mainstream with consumer products like Amazon Alexa and Apple Siri, and Hitachi believes that it is the collaboration of AI and humans that will bring real benefits to society,” said Hitachi Vantara's Hubert Yoshida, chief technology officer, and Russell Skingsley, chief technology officer of Asia Pacific. “Through tools like Pentaho Data Integration, our aim is to democratize the data engineering and data science process to make Machine Intelligence – a combination of Machine Learning and AI – more accessible to a wider variety of developers and engineers.

Zakir Ahmed, General Manager of Asia at Oracle NetSuite, notes that to date, AI has mostly been following simple rules. If A = B then C else D. This proved to be sufficient for powering devices like smart fridges or cars. On the downside, this predictability also meant that people could easily outsmart AI, often with dire consequences.
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Wearable tech begins to help monitor chronic diseases

Wearable tech begins to help monitor chronic diseases | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In the last months of Steve Jobs’ life, the Apple co-founder fought cancer while managing diabetes.

Because he hated pricking his finger to draw blood, Jobs authorized an Apple research team to develop a noninvasive glucose reader with technology that could potentially be incorporated into a wristwatch, according to people familiar with the events, who asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to speak on behalf of the company.

It was one of many medical applications that Apple considered for the Apple Watch, which debuted in 2015. Yet because many of the health features proved unreliable or required too many compromises in the watch’s size or battery life, Apple ended up positioning the device for activity tracking and notifications instead.

Now, the Apple Watch is finding a medical purpose after all.

In September, Apple announced the Apple Watch would no longer need to be tethered to a smartphone and would become more of a stand-alone device. Since then, a wave of device manufacturers have tapped into the watch’s new features like cellular connectivity to develop medical accessories — such as an electrocardiogram for monitoring heart activity — so people can manage chronic conditions straight from their wrist.

What is happening with the Apple Watch is one of the first signs of a leap forward in the utility of wearable devices. Many people had wondered why they would need a smartwatch at all when most already carry more powerful smartphones with them. But as the Apple Watch becomes capable of handling more medical tasks on its own, they may now have an answer.

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Using wearable device, researchers capture sleep for the first time

Using wearable device, researchers capture sleep for the first time | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Modern sleep studies typically occur in a sleep lab, in a sleep environment drastically different from what someone normally experiences. Using wearable technology, researchers are finding ways for sleep to be recorded at home.

MEASURING SLEEP
Until now, measuring a person’s sleep was an arduous, complicated process. Patients have been required to go to a sleep lab, where a team of scientists and physicians used a whole host of technologies to capture sleep — all while the participants attempted to nod off in a decidedly unnatural environment. This method is extremely costly and time-consuming, and might not reflect how sleep happens in a natural setting. But one new finding could spell the end of difficult sleep studies.

As published in the journal Current Biology, researchers developed a method which allowed them to accurately capture sleep, gathering detailed information about human sleep for long periods of time while participants were at home. Not only is this method cheaper and easier for both patients and researchers; it is the first time that it will be possible to objectively measure the realistic sleep habits and sleep quality of large numbers of people.

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Digitized to Democratized: These Are the 6 Ds of Exponential Technologies

Digitized to Democratized: These Are the 6 Ds of Exponential Technologies | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

“The Six Ds are a chain reaction of technological progression, a road map of rapid development that always leads to enormous upheaval and opportunity.”

–Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler, Bold

We live in incredible times. News travels the globe in an instant. Music, movies, games, communication, and knowledge are ever-available on always-connected devices. From biotechnology to artificial intelligence, powerful technologies that were once only available to huge organizations and governments are becoming more accessible and affordable thanks to digitization.

The potential for entrepreneurs to disrupt industries and corporate behemoths to unexpectedly go extinct has never been greater.

One hundred or fifty or even twenty years ago, disruption meant coming up with a product or service people needed but didn’t have yet, then finding a way to produce it with higher quality and lower costs than your competitors. This entailed hiring hundreds or thousands of employees, having a large physical space to put them in, and waiting years or even decades for hard work to pay off and products to come to fruition.

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Algorithms Are Getting Better at Identifying Human Behavior

Algorithms Are Getting Better at Identifying Human Behavior | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The holiday season has many things associated with it that generates positive emotions in people around the world. Sadly, it is also a time that generates negative feelings which includes suicidal thoughts.  Although humans are getting better in understanding the human psyche, suicide among young adults is the second-leading cause of death according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Fortunately, artificial intelligence is improving in this field as algorithms are getting better at identifying human behavior.

What is an Algorithm?
Let’s first explain what an algorithm is, which is a procedure used to help find the answer to a mathematical problem (finding the greatest common divisor) in a number of finite steps which frequently involves repetition of an operation; in other words, a step-by-step procedure for figuring out the answer to a problem or accomplishing some end by using a computer.  While this may be a lot to take in, just remember that AI has evolved from simply being used to retrieve data to answer factual questions (think of the show Jeopardy) to now being able to identify specific human behaviors.

Source: Medium
How algorithms have been identifying human behavior
Back in 2014, an article by Jennifer Golbeck focused on the type of insights one can make about an individual by analyzing social media accounts.  Considering the amount of data that is shared on various social media sites, the information that some may think is innocuous is revealing; analyzing tens of thousands of other profiles can lead to secrets one never intended on sharing.  The title of the article, Smart People Prefer Curly Fries, shows that using the right algorithms and combining it with meaningful data can result in revealing human behavior/characteristics that even the individual was not aware of.

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10 Predictions For A Global Healthcare Market Set To Cross The $1.85 Trillion Mark In 2018

10 Predictions For A Global Healthcare Market Set To Cross The $1.85 Trillion Mark In 2018 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Every year at Frost & Sullivan, the Transformational Health team brainstorms top predictions for the New Year to come. Despite ongoing political uncertainties and rising cost pressures, the global healthcare industry will register a stable growth rate during 2018, and it will cross the $1.85 trillion mark in terms of manufactures’ revenues. Digital health investments crossed $6.5 billion in 2017, up 109% from the previous year. Furthermore, we expect this growth curve to continue in the next year as technologies and platform solutions that promote innovation around care quality, outcomes, and chronic disease management will continue to rise. High growth opportunities in emerging markets will change the paradigms of product development and geographic rollouts.

The following are our ten top predictions for global healthcare for 2018:

Prediction #1: Service-as-product solutions to become the powerful tool to achieve competitive advantage in healthcare.

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2018: The Year of the Cryptocurrency Craze | Backchannel

2018: The Year of the Cryptocurrency Craze | Backchannel | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Every successful new technology undergoes a Cambrian Era-style explosion of growth in which we try to use it for everything. Email, search, social networking—each passed through its “this will solve all our problems!” phase before we figured out what its best applications and limitations were. With the Bitcoin bubble testing astronomical prices every day, cryptocurrencies and the blockchain technology that drives them are now taking their turn in this one-tech-fits-all role.

Scott Rosenberg is a journalist, editor, blogger, and non-fiction author, as well as a cofounder of Salon Media Group and Salon.com.

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Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence

Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

TODAY, A TEASPOON of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over. It’s exactly the kind of problem that makes sense to outsource to artificial intelligence.

On Monday, Google released a tool called DeepVariant that uses deep learning—the machine learning technique that now dominates AI—to assemble full human genomes. Modeled loosely on the networks of neurons in the human brain, these massive mathematical models have learned how to do things like identify faces posted to your Facebook news feed, transcribe your inane requests to Siri, and even fight internet trolls. And now, engineers at Google Brain and Verily (Alphabet’s life sciences spin-off) have taught one to take raw sequencing data and line up the billions of As, Ts, Cs, and Gs that make you you.

And oh yeah, it’s more accurate than all the existing methods out there. Last year, DeepVariant took first prize in an FDA contest promoting improvements in genetic sequencing.

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What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages | McKinsey & Company

What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages | McKinsey & Company | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In an era marked by rapid advances in automation and artificial intelligence, new research assesses the jobs lost and jobs gained under different scenarios through 2030.

The technology-driven world in which we live is a world filled with promise but also challenges. Cars that drive themselves, machines that read X-rays, and algorithms that respond to customer-service inquiries are all manifestations of powerful new forms of automation. Yet even as these technologies increase productivity and improve our lives, their use will substitute for some work activities humans currently perform—a development that has sparked much public concern.

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The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses

The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

WHEN YOU THINK of automation, you probably think of the assembly line, a dramatic dance of robot arms with nary a human laborer in sight. But that’s child’s play. The grandest, most disruptive automation revolution has played out in agriculture. First with horses and plows, and eventually with burly combines—technologies that have made farming exponentially cheaper and more productive. Just consider that in 1790, farmers made up 90 percent of the US workforce. In 2012, it was 1.5 percent, yet America still eats.

Here in 2017, the automation revolution in agriculture is poised to take on a whole new life—thanks to robots. In a nondescript office park in Silicon Valley, a startup called Iron Ox is taking the first steps toward roboticizing greenhouse farming, which has so far stubbornly resisted automation. In the very near future, then, the salad on your table may come from the hand of a robot.

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Nine Visions of 2050 as Depicted by Science Fiction - OpenMind

Nine Visions of 2050 as Depicted by Science Fiction - OpenMind | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The quote “‘it’s hard to make predictions, especially about the future” is usually attributed to physicist Niels Bohr. But if he really did say those words, it seems the Danish scientist was enunciating an idea that was already circulating in his country. And despite the truth behind that proverbial warning, humans have succumbed to the temptation of predicting the future for many centuries. The science fiction genre in particular gives free rein to speculation, while eliminating any risk of great blunders. After all, it’s only fiction. Below are some works from the genre that have shaped our vision of the future, featuring ideas that could potentially become a reality midway through this century.

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Reactive Content Will Get to Know You Intimately—Then Tell You the Perfect Story

Reactive Content Will Get to Know You Intimately—Then Tell You the Perfect Story | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The best storytellers react to their audience. They look for smiles, signs of awe, or boredom; they simultaneously and skillfully read both the story and their sitters. Kevin Brooks, a seasoned storyteller working for Motorola’s Human Interface Labs, explains, “As the storyteller begins, they must tune in to… the audience’s energy. Based on this energy, the storyteller will adjust their timing, their posture, their characterizations, and sometimes even the events of the story. There is a dialog between audience and storyteller.”

Shortly after I read the script to Melita, the latest virtual reality experience from Madrid-based immersive storytelling company Future Lighthouse, CEO Nicolas Alcalá explained to me that the piece is an example of “reactive content,” a concept he’s been working on since his days at Singularity University.

For the first time in history, we have access to technology that can merge the reactive and affective elements of oral storytelling with the affordances of digital media, weaving stunning visuals, rich soundtracks, and complex meta-narratives in a story arena that has the capability to know you more intimately than any conventional storyteller could.

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The Strengths and Weaknesses of Modern Machine Learning Algorithms

The Strengths and Weaknesses of Modern Machine Learning Algorithms | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

When it comes to today’s machine learning algorithms, they are being used in a variety of ways as well as in different fields.  Healthcare, businesses, research are just a few examples where artificial intelligence is being applied to solve problems that either humans could not do by themselves or would take massive amounts of time to solve. 

However, everything in life has its strengths and weaknesses; modern machine learning algorithms are unfortunately no exception to this rule. Earlier this year, an article posted on the Elite Data Science website focused on several types of today’s modern machine learning algorithms as well as their strengths and weakness.

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Deep Learning Achievements Over the Past Year – Stats and Bots

Great developments in text, voice, and computer vision technologies
At Statsbot, we’re constantly reviewing the deep learning achievements to improve our models and product. Around Christmas time, our team decided to take stock of the recent achievements in deep learning over the past year (and a bit longer). We translated the article by a data scientist, Ed Tyantov, to tell you about the most significant developments that can affect our future.

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2017: As told through Elon Musk's tweets

2017: As told through Elon Musk's tweets | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Love him or hate him, Elon Musk ruled 2017. From exploring our potential as cyborgs to the realistic next steps for colonizing Mars, Musk is changing life as we know it.

Musk’s Year
2017 could arguably be called the year of Elon Musk. Love him or hate him, he seemed to be everywhere, doing just about everything. From Australian megabatteries, to teasing the world by suggesting he might blast a Tesla Roadster into space, Musk has dipped his toes into every sector. From Neuralink to Tesla to SpaceX and even the Boring Company, Musk is revolutionizing the way we think about and approach transportation, space travel, and even our own brains. So let’s take a look back at 2017 through the Twitter of the man who is taking reality and shaping it for the future:

Musk’s first tweet of 2017 marked progress in the reusable Falcon 9 rockets. Within this year alone, SpaceX launched 16 Falcon 9 rockets. In the new year, they expect to launch the Falcon Heavy, which includes boosters and modified first-stages from Falcon 9 rockets. The advancement of reusable rockets will allow us to further embrace space exploration.

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The five most amazing things that were 3-D-printed this year

The five most amazing things that were 3-D-printed this year | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Additive manufacturing has been hyped for years. But in 2017 much of its promise materialized: 3-D printing took a series of big steps out of the realm of niche prototyping and into the world of mass manufacturing. Here’s a look at some of the most impressive things 3-D printers made this year, as well as what their creations portend for the future.

Running shoes
Eyeglasses, a bevel gear, and a miniature replica of the MIT dome
Jet-engine combustion liner
Stronger steel
Quickly made metal parts

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AI, machine learning, and deep learning: What they are and how they differ

AI, machine learning, and deep learning: What they are and how they differ | Futurewaves | Scoop.it


Artificial intelligence is no longer the stuff of science fiction flicks. It’s a reality, and chances are you’re interacting and being impacted by AI technology-powered applications every day. AI seems to be the phrase on everybody’s lips these days, right from makers of autonomous trucks that can travel thousands of miles without requiring human intervention to truck drivers who fear they’ll be out of a job if these AI-powered trucks make it to the roads. In 2016, Google’s DeepMind AlphaGo program competed against Lee Se-dol, South Korean master of the board game Go, the program emerged victorious. Media coverage used terms such as AI, machine learning, and deep learning interchangeably as if they all meant the same thing. The truth is, they don’t. Of course, all three technologies were responsible for AlphaGo’s victory in their own way, but they are all different. And probably if it were an AI-powered press release writer program, this mistake might not have happened!

To make sure that you can make sense of the latest revolutions from the world of technology, it’s crucial that you understand the nuances that separate AI, machine learning, and deep learning. So read on.

AI: Technology that makes machines behave like intelligent humans

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, December 28, 2017 6:18 AM

For all who wants to know the differences.

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Robots Will Transform Fast Food

Robots Will Transform Fast Food | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Visitors to henn-na, a restaurant outside Nagasaki, Japan, are greeted by a peculiar sight: their food being prepared by a row of humanoid robots that bear a passing resemblance to the Terminator. The “head chef,” incongruously named Andrew, specializes in okonomiyaki, a Japanese pancake. Using his two long arms, he stirs batter in a metal bowl, then pours it onto a hot grill. While he waits for the batter to cook, he talks cheerily in Japanese about how much he enjoys his job. His robot colleagues, meanwhile, fry donuts, layer soft-serve ice cream into cones, and mix drinks. One made me a gin and tonic.

H.I.S., the company that runs the restaurant, as well as a nearby hotel where robots check guests into their rooms and help with their luggage, turned to automation partly out of necessity. Japan’s population is shrinking, and its economy is booming; the unemployment rate is currently an unprecedented 2.8 percent. “Using robots makes a lot of sense in a country like Japan, where it’s hard to find employees,” CEO Hideo Sawada told me.

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Welcome to the future, a place where everyone knows your genetic code

Welcome to the future, a place where everyone knows your genetic code | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

People all over the world are starting to learn the secrets encoded in their DNA. They want to learn about what diseases they might some day have or what diseases they might pass on to their children. Or they want to discover more about their own ancestry.
No matter if it’s a medical institution or a direct-to-consumer company sequencing their genomes, people skim over the fine print about what happens to their data. They don’t think much about how it’s stored or protected. The organization, they might assume, will keep it safe in a database, isolating their identifying information from their genetic data. In most cases, they’d be wrong.

Recently, experts have shown that it’s impossible to completely de-identify genetic information. And though genetic testing is still in its infancy, it will soon become more routine in medicine and beyond, amplifying patient fears about breaches and leaks. Those fears range from discrimination to the abstract uneasiness that comes with a loss of privacy. Decades in the future, there’s a chance that protections will improve — or that our notion of privacy will shift altogether (and maybe even disappear).

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Google’s AI can create better machine-learning code than the researchers who made it

Google’s AI can create better machine-learning code than the researchers who made it | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Last May 2017, Google Brain researchers released an artificial intelligence that had never been seen before: AutoML, which was designed to write and develop AI on its own. And surprisingly, AutoML recently created its own “child” AI that could perform a certain task with more efficiency than any AI developed by a human programmer. AutoML …
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4 Revolutions Made Possible by the Blockchain Economy

4 Revolutions Made Possible by the Blockchain Economy | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Blockchain has quickly become a polarizing figurehead for a new generation of optimistic innovators. And though much of the attention is stuck covering the transient, yet lucrative financial returns found in cryptocurrency markets, the long-term implications of the backend technology may turn out to be 100x more impactful.

At a high level, as defined by CBInsights, "Blockchain technology offers a way for untrusted parties to reach agreement (consensus) on a common digital history. A common digital history is important because digital assets and transactions are in theory easily faked and/or duplicated. Blockchain technology solves this problem without using a trusted intermediary."

We can leverage these core tenets to solve for a number of organizational issues around trust, authentication, and verification that have challenged society for decades. We can make the industry dramatically more efficient, automated, and secure. While the actual timetable for wide-scale consumer and enterprise adoption is largely variable, there are interesting applications coming sooner than you may think.

Here are 4 revolutions, only made possible by an advancing blockchain economy, that will disrupt conventional business as we know it and how we interact with one another. Live, as we know it, will never be the same again. That's because this technology is bringing a level of transparency and decentralization that will have massive life-changing ramifications we are only just beginning to fully appreciate.  

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The road to XL Day: Regulating meds with Project Ipsilon - E52

The road to XL Day: Regulating meds with Project Ipsilon - E52 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

At the High Tech Campus, seven start-ups have been busy with the HighTechXL accelerator program for the last three months. They are on their way to the XL Day on 6 December, where they can win over future investors. E52 takes a glimpse into the crowd and works towards XL Day with portraits of the start-ups. Today: Project Ipsilon.

Project Ipsilon is based in Rotterdam, but actually not a strictly Dutch global start-up. With a medical advisor in San Francisco, a strategist in New York, a business developer in Amsterdam and researchers in Eindhoven, it is very much an international enterprise. The founder and CEO of Project Ipsilon, Yayoi Sakaki, is a Japanese pianist, who lives in New Jersey and is in Eindhoven for the HighTechXL accelerator program. She tells about the origins of the start-up: “My background is classical piano. I’ve been performing in different venues such as Carnegie Hall Weill Recital Hall, but I’m also a teacher. I see a lot of students that are diagnosed with ADHD and take a lot of medication. But I wonder if every one of them actually needs to take that much medication. Diagnosing ADHD remains controversial due to lack of established protocols. We live in a society of instantaneous gratification and the patience and attention level of average students are much lower, compared to the students ten years ago. The cognitive capabilities of the children today are also lower. Taking that in account, it is very difficult to diagnose ADHD properly.” Sakaki wondered if some of her students were a victim of over-diagnosis; and after a lot of research, she decided to use her love of music and combine it with technology to help detect it.


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Can a smartwatch “happimeter” measure and predict your happiness levels?

Can a smartwatch “happimeter” measure and predict your happiness levels? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
One of the more important challenges of 21st-century living is figuring out how to be happy. There is no shortage of advice. Aristotle wrote that “happiness is a state of activity.” And one team of researchers found that it is possible to increase happiness levels by surrounding yourself with people who are happy. Indeed, each happy individual in your life reportedly increases your happiness by about 9 percent.

But the science of happiness is hindered by a significant measurement problem. How can we measure happiness levels accurately and then use that data to predict when and how a person will be happy in the future?

Today we get an answer of sorts, thanks to the work of Pascal Budner and pals at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. These guys have found a way to use a smart watch to measure and predict happiness.
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nukem777's curator insight, November 27, 2017 7:34 AM
Don't know, but I do know what makes me happy, and I don't need a watch to tell me.
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The firm that can 3D print human body parts

The firm that can 3D print human body parts | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Erik Gatenholm grins widely as he presses the start button on a 3D printer, instructing it to print a life-size human nose.
It sparks a frenzied 30-minute burst of energy from the printer, as its thin metal needle buzzes around a Petri dish, distributing light blue ink in a carefully programmed order.
The process looks something like a hi-tech sewing machine weaving an emblem onto a garment.
But soon the pattern begins to rise and swell, and a nose, constructed using a bio-ink containing real human cells, grows upwards from the glass, glowing brightly under an ultraviolet light.
This is 3D bioprinting, and it's almost too obvious to point out that its potential reads like something from a science fiction novel.
Currently focused on growing cartilage and skin cells suitable for testing drugs and cosmetics, Erik, 28, believes that within 20 years it could be used to produce organs that are actually fit for human implantation.
Erik is the chief executive and co-founder of a small Swedish company called Cellink. Founded in Gothenburg only a year ago, it is a world leader in bioprinting, and Erik has big ambitions

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