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Researchers make plant-based lithium-ion battery cathodes | Digital Trends

Researchers make plant-based lithium-ion battery cathodes | Digital Trends | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
A new method for making organic parts for batteries might soon make them even greener.
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Morality algorithm lets machines cooperate and compromise better than humans

Morality algorithm lets machines cooperate and compromise better than humans | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Over the past year, it's become pretty clear that machines can now beat us in many straightforward zero-sum games. A new study from an international team of computer scientists set out to develop a new type of game-playing algorithm – one that can play games that rely on traits like cooperation and compromise – and the researchers have found that machines can already deploy those characteristics better than humans.

Chess, Go and Poker are all adversarial games where two or more players are in conflict with each other. Games such as these offer clear milestones to gauge the progress of AI development, allowing humans to be pitted against computers with a tangible winner. But many real-world scenarios that AI will ultimately operate in require more complex, cooperative long term relationships between humans and machines.

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This drone rescued two people from rough seas off the coast of Australia

This drone rescued two people from rough seas off the coast of Australia | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Lifeguards testing out new drone technology in Australia have saved two people stranded off the coast of New South Wales state, as spotted by Quartz. The drone footage shows a birds-eye view of the ocean before the drone ejects the yellow floatation device, which inflates when it hits the water. The two teenage boys were caught about 700 meters (0.4 miles) offshore at Lennox Head in a swell of around three meters (9.8 feet). They were able to grab onto the floatation device and swim to shore.

 

“I was able to launch it, fly it to the location, and drop the pod all in about one to two minutes,” lifeguard supervisor Jai Sheridan told reporters. A government official confirmed the rescue took only 70 seconds, compared to the average six minutes it would take for a lifeguard to reach the swimmers. The drones were reportedly only unveiled that morning before being put to use, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.


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Bryan Worn's curator insight, January 21, 6:15 AM

The story tells it all

voicesymmetry's comment, January 22, 1:23 AM
Thats incredible
Darling Gomez's curator insight, January 22, 3:42 PM

Amazing!

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6 digital health predictions for 2018

6 digital health predictions for 2018 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Steve Kraus, one of the most active health-tech investors in the industry, gave his predictions for 2018, following the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference this week in San Francisco.

1. Don't expect IPOs
2. Start-ups need to do more
3. The truth about artificial intelligence in medicine
4. Biology isn't just a tech problem

5. Big tech will make moves 

6. The year of humble pie

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The blockchain will disrupt the music business and beyond

The blockchain will disrupt the music business and beyond | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In 2018, blockchain will create a new wave of major disruption in media-content distribution. The immutability and "trustless" nature of the blockchain means that it can be used in instances where record-keeping and auditable data is key, including data about who owns what assets, such as music and movies. Once you have verified the validity of an asset entered into the "chain" in the first place, continuity is ensured from then on.

Already, blockchain's potential to disrupt content rights distribution is coming to fruition in the music business. Streaming services such as Spotify and Deezer require an additional layer of intermediaries to ensure that the artists' rights management process is conducted properly. As a result, content creators need different contracts in each jurisdiction - often via multiple intermediaries - to protect their copyright and to enable distribution of their content.

But putting content on a blockchain, and having the connectivity for peer-to-peer transactions - via a digital currency such as Bitcoin, or a smart contract such as Ethereum - allows complete transparency and automation of execution, as well as direct payments to copyright holders. With these elements all in place, new players such as Musicoin and Revelator propose using the blockchain to simplify digital-rights management by bypassing the usual intermediaries, thus enabling micro-payment

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Mariana Mazzucato | Rediscovering public wealth creation

Mariana Mazzucato | Rediscovering public wealth creation | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Public value does not mean simply redistributing existing wealth or correcting issues affecting public goods. Instead, it means co-creating value in different spaces, says Mariana Mazzucato
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America’s 24 Dying Industries

America’s 24 Dying Industries | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Source: Thinkstock 24. 

Office supplies, except paper, manufacturing 

> Employment change 2007-2016: -42.1% 

> Employment total: 11,597 

> Wage growth 2007-2016: 12.2% 

> Avg. annual wage: $47,222 Office supplies manufacturing is one of many industries in the United States negatively affected by the increasing digitization of the workplace. 

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State of the art dying industries including data about employment change,wage growth and average annual wage.
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Mymanu Clik+ offers real-time translation in 37 languages

Mymanu Clik+ offers real-time translation in 37 languages | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Mymanu's Clik+ headphones come with a big promise: live translation between 37 languages. We saw something similar recently from Google and Bragi, but both of those are operating as a middleman, serving up the audio with an app doing the heavy lifting. Let's be clear, Mymanu also uses an app for translation, but the Click is designed to bring us one step closer to the app-free translation device we really want.

Prototypes of the Clik have been around for a while, but here at CES we were able to finally test it for ourselves. After a successful Indiegogo campaign last fall, the headset is poised to go into production, with an expected delivery date of March this year.

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How Neuroscience Is Beginning to Rewire the Brain From the Inside Out

How Neuroscience Is Beginning to Rewire the Brain From the Inside Out | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In an interview at Exponential Medicine in San Diego, Singularity University faculty and speaker Dr. Divya Chander takes a look at how emerging technologies are letting us peer inside the human brain like never before.

As an anesthesiologist and neuroscientist at Stanford University, Chander specializes in measuring brain activity and depth-of-consciousness in patients using tools like high-frequency EEG technology.

During her interview, Chander outlined how CRISPR gene editing and stem cells are being applied in neuroscience. She said, “We are beginning to rewire the brain from the inside out. We’re cutting out things that don’t work at the level of the nucleus. We’re actually correcting diseases before they even express themselves.”

As excited as Chander is about the advances in her field, she’s well aware of the precautions we need to be taking while innovating in neuroscience.

Chander believes this is an ethical conversation that needs to happen across the board and in every country. She warns we can’t just leave the conversation to neuroscientists or entrepreneurs alone.

One of our biggest ethical problems is: all of this technology that’s hacking the neural code can non-invasively read brainwaves in a way we’ve never been able to do before,” Chander said. “There’s a group at the University of Alabama that actually found that if you’re wearing an EEG cap and someone’s typing in a password, you can hack the password. Using optogenetics we can implant false memories into mice.

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Why AI Could Be Entering a Golden Age - Knowledge@Wharton

Why AI Could Be Entering a Golden Age - Knowledge@Wharton | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The quest to give machines human-level intelligence has been around for decades, and it has captured imaginations for far longer — think of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in the 19th century. Artificial intelligence, or AI, was born in the 1950s, with boom cycles leading to busts as scientists failed time and again to make machines act and think like the human brain. But this time could be different because of a major breakthrough — deep learning, where data structures are set up like the brain’s neural network to let computers learn on their own. Together with advances in computing power and scale, AI is making big strides today like never before.

Frank Chen, a partner specializing in AI at top venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, makes a case that AI could be entering a golden age. Knowledge@Wharton caught up with him at the recent AI Frontiers conference in Silicon Valley to talk about the state of AI, what’s realistic and what’s hype about the technology, and whether we will ever get to what some consider the Holy Grail of AI — when machines will achieve human-level intelligence.

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Key Highlights in Data Science / Deep Learning / Machine Learning 2017 and What can we Expect in 2018?

Key Highlights in Data Science / Deep Learning / Machine Learning 2017 and What can we Expect in 2018? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Introduction
2017 has been a really exciting year for a data science professional. This is pretty evident from the new technologies that have been emerging day-by-day such as Face-ID which has revolutionized the way we secure information in our mobile phones. Self-driving cars had been a myth, but now they are very much a reality, the adoption of which can be seen by governments throughout the world.

Data science is a field wherein ground-breaking research is happening at a much faster pace, in comparison to any other emergent technologies ever before. The time between contemplating a research idea and actually implementing it has come down significantly. . This is also fueled by the immense amount of resources freely available to everyone – which essentially enables even a normal person to contribute to research in their own way. For example, GitHub (a collaborative platform for software development) is now paving the way for research ideas to be shared in an implementation format. As Andrew Ng said

Data is the new Oil
AI is the new Electricity

Interesting Snippets of Year 2017
1. PowerBlox developed a scalable energy device capable of storing and distributing electricity from a variety of inputs

2. Neuralink : A high bandwidth and safe Brain-Machine Interface
Tags – Startup, Innovation

3. Face Recognition for payment transaction in KFC China
Tags – Innovation, Retail Industry, Computer Vision

4. Release of Deeplearn.js: Harness Machine Learning in Your Browser


5. Release of CatBoost: A machine learning library to handle categorical data automatically
Tags – machine learning, open source software

6.IBM Watson to aid in filing taxes
Tags – Company Collaboration, Finance

7. Shelf Engine: A startup developing AI to prevent food wastage
Tags – Startup, Food Industry

8. Body Labs – a start-up acquired by Amazon develops 3D models of individual human bodies from images

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Watch For China's Silicon Valley To Dominate In 2018 And Beyond

Watch For China's Silicon Valley To Dominate In 2018 And Beyond | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

China's Silicon Valley is ripening as new technologies and loads of venture capital flood the market. Expect this trend to gain force in 2018 as a Silicon Dragon shows its muscle. 

As another year wraps up and a new year begins, 

it's clear that the concept of a Silicon Dragon has gone mainstream. The western world can no longer ignore the expanding power, influence and impact of China's Silicon Valley. 

 Over the past decade since my first book Silicon Dragon was published in 2008, China's tech and venture scene has evolved quickly. It's no longer considered a joke to say that China is winning the tech race. 

There are just too many examples of how China IS leading advances in a new era of technology. It's clearly no longer a case of copying ideas from the West. 

Today, it's about ideas traveling from China to the West and being copied. What a transformation! The world's biggest tech companies are no longer mainly from America. 

In addition to Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Alphabet, there's Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent and Xiaomi from China. 

Right behind them are China's next-in-line leaders: news aggregator Toutiao, group e-commerce dealer Meituan and ride-sharing leader Didi Chuxing. 

If you mention Jack Ma's name today in a conversation with friends and family, they actually know who you mean. Name recognition is easier when you're one of Asia's top billionaires and running one of the world's most valuable companies.

Not content to dominate China tech in their homeland, Chinese power businesses are going global, moving into Hollywood, real estate in New York and LA, and innovative startups in Silicon Valley. They're beating American businesses to newly emerging opportunities in Southeast Asia too, an important next frontier. Chinese entrepreneurs are known for moving with lightning speed and at non-stop work hours to start up new businesses. 

A new term has been coined to describe their work life, 996, meaning 9 to 9, 6 days per week. Silicon Valley can look decidedly sleepy, by comparison. China is getting ahead in many fields that are revolutionizing tech, from artificial intelligence to fintech to virtual reality to the sharing economy and retail e-commerce. What's more, these categories see U.S. and Chinese businesses competing head-to-head: Baidu with Google, Alibaba with Amazon, Facebook with Wechat, and Huawei with Apple. 

There's plenty of money in the Middle Kingdom to finance these China's next upstarts.

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74 Things That Blew Our Minds in 2017 - The Atlantic

74 Things That Blew Our Minds in 2017 - The Atlantic | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
This past year, reporters on The Atlantic’s science, technology, and health desks worked tirelessly, writing hundreds of stories. Each of those stories is packed with facts that surprised us, delighted us, and in some cases, unsettled us. Instead of picking our favorite stories, we decided to round up a small selection of the most astonishing things we learned in 2017. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did, and we hope you’ll be back for more in 2018:


Via John Evans
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This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems

This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Google's AutoML project, designed to make AI build other AIs, has now developed a computer vision system that vastly outperforms state-of-the-art-models.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, January 3, 9:05 AM

When AI can create AI children, and those children on their turn are able to create children, we only need 2 AIs creating 2 children each second to be completely overtaken by AIs before we even realize it...

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Survival Capsule designed to withstand tsunamis gets its first buyer

Survival Capsule designed to withstand tsunamis gets its first buyer | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Jeanne Johnson, a Microsoft employee from New Orleans is the first person to buy one of the Survival Capsules, which are designed to protect against tsunamis and earthquakes.
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Automation, robots and the 'end of work' myth

Automation, robots and the 'end of work' myth | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Can you imagine travelling to work in a robotic “Jonnycab” like the one predicted in the cult Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Total Recall? The image from 1990 is based on science fiction, but Mercedes Benz does have a semi-autonomous Driver Pilot system that it aims to install in the next five years and Uber is also waging on a self-driving future. Its partnership with Volvo has been seen as a boost to its ambitions to replace a fleet of self-employed drivers with autonomous vehicles.

Jonnycab might belong to futurology but if MIT academics Erik Brynjolfson and Andrew McAfee are right, we may all be rejoicing at the prospect of extended leisure time, as robotic technologies free us from the drudgery of work. Except for the fact that big business will be keeping its eye on the bottom line and will often be opting for fast and cheap alternatives.

No work, more play?
These are not new concepts. Karl Marx argued technology would help free workers from harsh labour and lead to a “reduction to working time”. In the 1930s Bertrand Russell wrote of the benefits of “a little more idleness” and the economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that automation could enable a shorter working week of less than 15 hours.
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How Technology Will Screw Up Our Senses

How Technology Will Screw Up Our Senses | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

At the American Museum of Natural History’s Senses exhibit in New York, there is a room that is completely wallpapered in squiggly black lines, including the floor and ceiling. It’s otherwise a normal room: six sides, two doors. One door is an entrance that warns visitors of potential dizziness, which I scoff at. Me, dizzy? In a room? Pssh. I stepped in without a second thought.

On that cold January afternoon, the squiggly room owned me. As soon as I entered, the squiggly black lines came to life, snaking and pulsing and making me trip. I’m clumsy, sure, but this was a flat room. The lines weren’t uniform, and depending on how they were spaced, some “moved” more than others. Intellectually, I knew the room wasn’t moving. But something deep within me disagreed viciously, and I stumbled out of the room before I threw up.

Robert DeSalle, a genomics expert who curated the exhibit and wrote Our Senses: An Immersive Experience, said that my overconfidence entering the room of squiggly lines was indicative of the fact that we humans are way too confident about the superiority of our senses.

“Our neural range of processing, compared to animals, is not really good,” DeSalle said. Translation: Our senses and how we perceive our space sucks.

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nukem777's curator insight, January 21, 7:38 AM
DeSalle and Graziano both agree that technology is—and will continue—to affect humans. “We’re doing a giant experiment on ourselves,” Graziano said. “People become unmoored socially in cyberspace, where there is no such thing as personal space.
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Privacy and Policy Implications of the Coming AI Revolution - Stay Safe Online

Privacy and Policy Implications of the Coming AI Revolution - Stay Safe Online | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Picture, if you will, 10 years into the future. What do you see? A modern society where human and machine work hand in hand to solve history’s greatest conundrums, or the imminent collapse of human civilization at the hands of our robot overlords? The second scenario is a little dramatic (and less likely) but nonetheless helps to illustrate the two seemingly polar views of artificial intelligence (AI) – as either a boon for humankind or a creator of even more problems. We might actually see something in between those two scenarios: AI and robots will cause societal growing pains, but both will largely prove valuable in many industries and applications such as health care, cybersecurity and transportation.

One area in particular where AI is poised to make a huge difference (and frankly, already has) is the field of cybersecurity. A recent study from Frost & Sullivan and (ISC)² found that the global cybersecurity workforce will have more than 1.5 million unfilled positions by 2020. It’s clear there’s a huge need for skilled cyber workers in the public and private sectors, but there aren’t enough to go around.

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AI Beat Humans at Reading! Maybe Not

AI Beat Humans at Reading! Maybe Not | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
NEWS SPREAD MONDAY of a remarkable breakthrough in artificial intelligence. Microsoft and Chinese retailer Alibaba independently announced that they had made software that matched or outperformed humans on a reading-comprehension test devised at Stanford. Microsoft called it a “major milestone.” Media coverage amplified the claims, with Newsweek estimating “millions of jobs at risk.”

Those jobs seem safe for a while. Closer examination of the tech giants’ claims suggests their software hasn’t yet drawn level with humans, even within the narrow confines of the test used.
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CES 2018: Digital health devices coming to your home

CES 2018: Digital health devices coming to your home | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

​ Tech devices are giving people more control over how they address their health needs from better sleep to insight on how to care for their skin.

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2017 was the year of gene-therapy breakthroughs

2017 was the year of gene-therapy breakthroughs | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Rewriting Life
2017 Was the Year of Gene-Therapy Breakthroughs
Gene-fixing treatments have now cured a number of patients with cancer and rare diseases.
by Emily Mullin January 3, 2018

It was a notable year for gene therapy. The first such treatments in the U.S. came to market this year after winning approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Meanwhile, researchers announced more miraculous cures of patients with rare and life-threatening diseases who were treated with experimental therapies.

Decades in the making, gene therapy—the idea of modifying a person’s DNA to treat disease—represents a major shift in medicine. Instead of just treating symptoms like the vast majority of drugs on the market, gene therapy aims to correct the underlying genetic cause of a disease. Doctors and scientists hope these treatments will be a one-shot cure.

Last year, we wrote that 2016 was gene therapy’s most promising year. But 2017 proved to be even bigger.
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Our music tech predictions for 2018: SoundCloud's survival, the Bitcoin boom and more modular madness

Our music tech predictions for 2018: SoundCloud's survival, the Bitcoin boom and more modular madness | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

What technological trends can listeners and artists expect in 2018? Scott Wilson stares into his crystal ball to discover how tech may change the way we consume and make music in 2017, wondering what changes are coming to Spotify, whether SoundCloud will survive and whether Eurorack gear will continue to inspire  musicians.

From the insidious rise of “fake news” to the increasing prevalence of AI in our everyday lives, 2017 was actually a pretty terrifying year in terms of technology’s impact on society. In the music industry, streaming continued to dominate the headlines, as SoundCloud struggled to stay afloat and artists pushed back against the allegedly meagre royalties doled out to smaller artists and labels by companies like Spotify.

Technology’s impact on music in 2017 wasn’t all bad. For music-makers at least, the year brought a slew of innovative new apps and gadgets for production, while blockchain technology started to be taken seriously as a way of making sure musicians and everyone involved in the music production and distribution process get paid properly and fairly.

So what technological developments and trends might 2018 hold for artists and listeners? We’ve made some predictions on what the next 12 months might bring to the music industry – the good things and the bad.

1. SoundCloud will survive 2018, but its influence and usability will wane
2. Big changes at Spotify and beyond will impact its users
3. Cryptocurrency hype will hit the music industry, and probably not in a good way
4. The synth clone wars are just getting started
5. Music-making will become easier for beginners than ever

6. Non-traditional MIDI controllers go mainstream

7. Eurorack gear will continue to boom

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This Suit Will Take Virtual Reality To A Whole New Level

This Suit Will Take Virtual Reality To A Whole New Level | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Eureka Park Preview: Teslasuit Reinvents Virtual Reality Making It A 4D Experience
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India facing possible ‘mental health epidemic’: President Kovind - Times of India

India facing possible ‘mental health epidemic’: President Kovind - Times of India | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
BENGALURU: President Ram Nath Kovind on Saturday said that India is facing a possible 'mental health epidemic', and stressed on the need to take up access to treatment facilities by 2022 as a national mission while also addressing the shortage of mental health professionals.
He was speaking at the 22nd convocation of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (Nimhans) here. Pointing out that there are just about 5,000 psychiatrists and less than 2,000 clinical psychologists in the country, he said that that these numbers are very small, especially for the purpose of diagnosis of mental illnesses.
"For those getting their degrees at the convocation, the real challenge has just begun. They are going into a world where their skills are acutely needed more than ever before. The country does not just have a mental health challenge but is also facing a possible mental health epidemic," Kovind said.
The technological, economic and demographic changes in the country are transforming the nature of diseases, he said.
He added that by 2022, when India celebrates its 75th anniversary of independence, the country must ensure that at least those suffering from serious mental health disorders have been diagnosed and have access to treatment facilities.
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Will Artificial Intelligence Become Conscious?

Will Artificial Intelligence Become Conscious? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Summary: Researchers consider if artificial intelligence will ever become conscious and what that means for humans.

Source: The Conversation.

Forget about today’s modest incremental advances in artificial intelligence, such as the increasing abilities of cars to drive themselves. Waiting in the wings might be a groundbreaking development: a machine that is aware of itself and its surroundings, and that could take in and process massive amounts of data in real time. It could be sent on dangerous missions, into space or combat. In addition to driving people around, it might be able to cook, clean, do laundry – and even keep humans company when other people aren’t nearby.

A particularly advanced set of machines could replace humans at literally all jobs. That would save humanity from workaday drudgery, but it would also shake many societal foundations. A life of no work and only play may turn out to be a dystopia.

Conscious machines would also raise troubling legal and ethical problems. Would a conscious machine be a “person” under law and be liable if its actions hurt someone, or if something goes wrong? To think of a more frightening scenario, might these machines rebel against humans and wish to eliminate us altogether? If yes, they represent the culmination of evolution.

As a professor of electrical engineering and computer science who works in machine learning and quantum theory, I can say that researchers are divided on whether these sorts of hyperaware machines will ever exist. There’s also debate about whether machines could or should be called “conscious” in the way we think of humans, and even some animals, as conscious. Some of the questions have to do with technology; others have to do with what consciousness actually is

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Neurotechnology, Elon Musk and the goal of human enhancement

Neurotechnology, Elon Musk and the goal of human enhancement | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
At the World Government Summit in Dubai in February, Tesla and SpaceX chief executive Elon Musk said that people would need to become cyborgs to be relevant in an artificial intelligence age. He said that a “merger of biological intelligence and machine intelligence” would be necessary to ensure we stay economically valuable. Soon afterwards, the serial entrepreneur created Neuralink, with the intention of connecting computers directly to human brains. He wants to do this using “neural lace” technology – implanting tiny electrodes into the brain for direct computing capabilities.Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) aren’t a new idea. Various forms of BCI are already available, from ones that sit on top of your head and measure brain signals to devices that are implanted into your brain tissue.
Via Alex Butler
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Dangerous thoughts. Economy is there for people not the other way round.
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