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sparks & honey 2013 trends snapshot

This report represents only a small snapshot of our trend analysis for 2013.
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Futurewaves
Exploring future trends
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Google’s AI can create better machine-learning code than the researchers who made it

Google’s AI can create better machine-learning code than the researchers who made it | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Last May 2017, Google Brain researchers released an artificial intelligence that had never been seen before: AutoML, which was designed to write and develop AI on its own. And surprisingly, AutoML recently created its own “child” AI that could perform a certain task with more efficiency than any AI developed by a human programmer. AutoML …
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4 Revolutions Made Possible by the Blockchain Economy

4 Revolutions Made Possible by the Blockchain Economy | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Blockchain has quickly become a polarizing figurehead for a new generation of optimistic innovators. And though much of the attention is stuck covering the transient, yet lucrative financial returns found in cryptocurrency markets, the long-term implications of the backend technology may turn out to be 100x more impactful.

At a high level, as defined by CBInsights, "Blockchain technology offers a way for untrusted parties to reach agreement (consensus) on a common digital history. A common digital history is important because digital assets and transactions are in theory easily faked and/or duplicated. Blockchain technology solves this problem without using a trusted intermediary."

We can leverage these core tenets to solve for a number of organizational issues around trust, authentication, and verification that have challenged society for decades. We can make the industry dramatically more efficient, automated, and secure. While the actual timetable for wide-scale consumer and enterprise adoption is largely variable, there are interesting applications coming sooner than you may think.

Here are 4 revolutions, only made possible by an advancing blockchain economy, that will disrupt conventional business as we know it and how we interact with one another. Live, as we know it, will never be the same again. That's because this technology is bringing a level of transparency and decentralization that will have massive life-changing ramifications we are only just beginning to fully appreciate.  

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The road to XL Day: Regulating meds with Project Ipsilon - E52

The road to XL Day: Regulating meds with Project Ipsilon - E52 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

At the High Tech Campus, seven start-ups have been busy with the HighTechXL accelerator program for the last three months. They are on their way to the XL Day on 6 December, where they can win over future investors. E52 takes a glimpse into the crowd and works towards XL Day with portraits of the start-ups. Today: Project Ipsilon.

Project Ipsilon is based in Rotterdam, but actually not a strictly Dutch global start-up. With a medical advisor in San Francisco, a strategist in New York, a business developer in Amsterdam and researchers in Eindhoven, it is very much an international enterprise. The founder and CEO of Project Ipsilon, Yayoi Sakaki, is a Japanese pianist, who lives in New Jersey and is in Eindhoven for the HighTechXL accelerator program. She tells about the origins of the start-up: “My background is classical piano. I’ve been performing in different venues such as Carnegie Hall Weill Recital Hall, but I’m also a teacher. I see a lot of students that are diagnosed with ADHD and take a lot of medication. But I wonder if every one of them actually needs to take that much medication. Diagnosing ADHD remains controversial due to lack of established protocols. We live in a society of instantaneous gratification and the patience and attention level of average students are much lower, compared to the students ten years ago. The cognitive capabilities of the children today are also lower. Taking that in account, it is very difficult to diagnose ADHD properly.” Sakaki wondered if some of her students were a victim of over-diagnosis; and after a lot of research, she decided to use her love of music and combine it with technology to help detect it.


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Can a smartwatch “happimeter” measure and predict your happiness levels?

Can a smartwatch “happimeter” measure and predict your happiness levels? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
One of the more important challenges of 21st-century living is figuring out how to be happy. There is no shortage of advice. Aristotle wrote that “happiness is a state of activity.” And one team of researchers found that it is possible to increase happiness levels by surrounding yourself with people who are happy. Indeed, each happy individual in your life reportedly increases your happiness by about 9 percent.

But the science of happiness is hindered by a significant measurement problem. How can we measure happiness levels accurately and then use that data to predict when and how a person will be happy in the future?

Today we get an answer of sorts, thanks to the work of Pascal Budner and pals at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. These guys have found a way to use a smart watch to measure and predict happiness.
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nukem777's curator insight, November 27, 7:34 AM
Don't know, but I do know what makes me happy, and I don't need a watch to tell me.
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The firm that can 3D print human body parts

The firm that can 3D print human body parts | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Erik Gatenholm grins widely as he presses the start button on a 3D printer, instructing it to print a life-size human nose.
It sparks a frenzied 30-minute burst of energy from the printer, as its thin metal needle buzzes around a Petri dish, distributing light blue ink in a carefully programmed order.
The process looks something like a hi-tech sewing machine weaving an emblem onto a garment.
But soon the pattern begins to rise and swell, and a nose, constructed using a bio-ink containing real human cells, grows upwards from the glass, glowing brightly under an ultraviolet light.
This is 3D bioprinting, and it's almost too obvious to point out that its potential reads like something from a science fiction novel.
Currently focused on growing cartilage and skin cells suitable for testing drugs and cosmetics, Erik, 28, believes that within 20 years it could be used to produce organs that are actually fit for human implantation.
Erik is the chief executive and co-founder of a small Swedish company called Cellink. Founded in Gothenburg only a year ago, it is a world leader in bioprinting, and Erik has big ambitions

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A Sensor That Could Soon Make Homes Scary-Smart

A Sensor That Could Soon Make Homes Scary-Smart | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

IF YOU WANT to set up a connected home, you’ve got two options. You can buy a bunch of smart gadgets that may or may not communicate with other smart gadgets. Or you can retrofit all of your appliances with sensor tags, creating a slapdash network. The first is expensive. The second is a hassle. Before long, though, you might have a third choice: One simple device that plugs into an electrical outlet and connects everything in the room.

That’s the idea behind Synthetic Sensors, a Carnegie Mellon University project that promises to make creating a smart, context-aware home a snap. The tiny device, unveiled this week at the big ACM CHI computer interaction conference, can capture all of the the environmental data needed to transform a wide variety of ordinary household objects into smart devices. It's a prototype for now, but as a proof of concept it's damn impressive.Plug the module into an electrical outlet and it becomes the eyes and ears of the room, its 10 embedded sensors logging information like sound, humidity, electromagnetic noise, motion, and light (the researchers excluded a camera for privacy reasons). Machine learning algorithms translate that data into context-specific information about what’s happening in the room. Synthetic Sensors can tell you, for example, if you forgot to turn off the oven, how much water your leaky faucet is wasting, or whether your roommate is swiping your snacks

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Artificial intelligence is now an arms race. What if the bad guys win?

Artificial intelligence is now an arms race. What if the bad guys win? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
One thing's for sure: no one is safe in a world where AI can hack itself.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, November 18, 1:18 PM

The dark side of #AI. And lessons learned from history tell us that bad guys are always the first to use it.

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Make your commute useful: 5 podcast episodes on the future of work

Make your commute useful: 5 podcast episodes on the future of work | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

These 5 podcast episodes all discuss the future of work from a variety of different perspectives. We all know that staying informed about what's going on in our industry is important. But in the middle of a busy workday, how do you find the time to read articles? With so many industry news sites writing in dry and jargonistic language, it can be tough to care enough or to will yourself to read them. That's one of the many things a podcast is good for: helping you stay up-to-date with a human voice that you can listen to anywhere, any time. Below, we've assembled episodes from five different podcasts for HR professionals, all on the subject of the future of work.


Proud to be one of them


Via Denis Pennel
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Eternal Life Is Mathematically Impossible, Says New Aging Theory

Eternal Life Is Mathematically Impossible, Says New Aging Theory | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
With unfaltering interest, funding, and human trials to fight age-related diseases—are we on the verge of beating aging? Not so fast, says a new study.
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We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads

We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
We're building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads are also used to organize your access to political and social information. And the machines aren't even the real threat. What we need to understand is how the powerful might use AI to control us -- and what we can do in response.
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We Simply Won't Go To Mars Without Digital Health - The Medical Futurist

We Simply Won't Go To Mars Without Digital Health - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

We’ll colonize Mars

There are plans for human missions to Mars by the United States, China, and Russia by the 2030s, the 2040–2060, and the 2040–2045 timeframes, respectively. Private companies such as SpaceX also plan to bring people to Mars and eventually colonize it. Elon Musk repeatedly said he wants to build a spaceship able to bring humans to the Red Planet (the latest is called the Big F*king Rocket), and launch the first two vehicles by 2022. These would be cargo missions to the surface of Mars, to find water for future missions. Two years later, he already wants to launch four rockets, two with crews.

According to Musk’s incredible vision, the BFR will transport one hundred people at a time to the surface of Mars. The huge rocket would have 40 cabins inside its payload area, enough to take one hundred people per flight to Mars. Passengers would be protected from incoming radiation in a solar storm shelter, while restaurants, zero-gravity games, and other entertainment areas would ensure they enjoy the five months long journey. Imagine that you ask the waiter in the restaurant addressed to the end of the universe to bring some more milk for your coffee and when exactly landing on the Mars Colony is scheduled.

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This AI robot will strengthen your ping-pong skills and your relationship with your daughter

This AI robot will strengthen your ping-pong skills and your relationship with your daughter | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
With all the recent talk of AI posing existential risks to humanity and our privacy, Japanese company Omron is taking a softer, more innocuous approach. Specifically, with its table tennis robot Forpheus, which strives to pursue “harmony of humans and machines” by patiently teaching us how to play ping-pong.

Although ping-pong ball-pitching machines like TrainerBot exist, Forpheus can actually live up to the feeling of playing against a real opponent. First introduced in 2014, the fourth generation of Forpheus (easier to remember than “Future Omron Robotics technology for Exploring Possibility of Harmonized aUtomation with Sinic theoretics”) was recently displayed at the CEATEC trade show last week. The updated machine adds a companion arm that can serve up balls in the air, and better predict smashes through improved AI.

A COMBINATION OF “FOR” AND “ORPHEUS,” A BARD IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY SYMBOLIZING CREATIVITY
Forpheus uses a robotic arm that is controlled by the AI through a 5-axis motor system to swing the paddle. The motion controller, or the “brain,” tells the machine how to hit the ball, advising it on timing and direction within a 1,000th of a second.
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The Quantum Internet is just a decade away. Here's what you need to know

The Quantum Internet is just a decade away. Here's what you need to know | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

As China moves closer to building a working quantum communications network, the possibility of a quantum internet becomes more and more real. But what does having a quantum internet mean?

The next level

The word “quantum” sounds so advanced and complex that people tend to get hyped up about anything attached to it. While not every quantum breakthrough elicits a positive response, in the case of a so-called quantum internet, people have a reason to be excited.

In the simplest of terms, a quantum internet would be one that uses quantum signals instead of radio waves to send information. But let’s explain that a bit further.

The internet as we know it uses radio frequencies to connect various computers through a global web in which electronic signals are sent back and forth. In a quantum internet, signals would be sent through a quantum network using entangled quantum particles.

Following what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance,” entangled particles exist in a special state that allows information carried in one to be instantaneously reflected in another — a sort of quantum teleportation.

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Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence

Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

TODAY, A TEASPOON of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over. It’s exactly the kind of problem that makes sense to outsource to artificial intelligence.

On Monday, Google released a tool called DeepVariant that uses deep learning—the machine learning technique that now dominates AI—to assemble full human genomes. Modeled loosely on the networks of neurons in the human brain, these massive mathematical models have learned how to do things like identify faces posted to your Facebook news feed, transcribe your inane requests to Siri, and even fight internet trolls. And now, engineers at Google Brain and Verily (Alphabet’s life sciences spin-off) have taught one to take raw sequencing data and line up the billions of As, Ts, Cs, and Gs that make you you.

And oh yeah, it’s more accurate than all the existing methods out there. Last year, DeepVariant took first prize in an FDA contest promoting improvements in genetic sequencing.

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What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages | McKinsey & Company

What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages | McKinsey & Company | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In an era marked by rapid advances in automation and artificial intelligence, new research assesses the jobs lost and jobs gained under different scenarios through 2030.

The technology-driven world in which we live is a world filled with promise but also challenges. Cars that drive themselves, machines that read X-rays, and algorithms that respond to customer-service inquiries are all manifestations of powerful new forms of automation. Yet even as these technologies increase productivity and improve our lives, their use will substitute for some work activities humans currently perform—a development that has sparked much public concern.

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The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses

The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

WHEN YOU THINK of automation, you probably think of the assembly line, a dramatic dance of robot arms with nary a human laborer in sight. But that’s child’s play. The grandest, most disruptive automation revolution has played out in agriculture. First with horses and plows, and eventually with burly combines—technologies that have made farming exponentially cheaper and more productive. Just consider that in 1790, farmers made up 90 percent of the US workforce. In 2012, it was 1.5 percent, yet America still eats.

Here in 2017, the automation revolution in agriculture is poised to take on a whole new life—thanks to robots. In a nondescript office park in Silicon Valley, a startup called Iron Ox is taking the first steps toward roboticizing greenhouse farming, which has so far stubbornly resisted automation. In the very near future, then, the salad on your table may come from the hand of a robot.

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Nine Visions of 2050 as Depicted by Science Fiction - OpenMind

Nine Visions of 2050 as Depicted by Science Fiction - OpenMind | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The quote “‘it’s hard to make predictions, especially about the future” is usually attributed to physicist Niels Bohr. But if he really did say those words, it seems the Danish scientist was enunciating an idea that was already circulating in his country. And despite the truth behind that proverbial warning, humans have succumbed to the temptation of predicting the future for many centuries. The science fiction genre in particular gives free rein to speculation, while eliminating any risk of great blunders. After all, it’s only fiction. Below are some works from the genre that have shaped our vision of the future, featuring ideas that could potentially become a reality midway through this century.

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Reactive Content Will Get to Know You Intimately—Then Tell You the Perfect Story

Reactive Content Will Get to Know You Intimately—Then Tell You the Perfect Story | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The best storytellers react to their audience. They look for smiles, signs of awe, or boredom; they simultaneously and skillfully read both the story and their sitters. Kevin Brooks, a seasoned storyteller working for Motorola’s Human Interface Labs, explains, “As the storyteller begins, they must tune in to… the audience’s energy. Based on this energy, the storyteller will adjust their timing, their posture, their characterizations, and sometimes even the events of the story. There is a dialog between audience and storyteller.”

Shortly after I read the script to Melita, the latest virtual reality experience from Madrid-based immersive storytelling company Future Lighthouse, CEO Nicolas Alcalá explained to me that the piece is an example of “reactive content,” a concept he’s been working on since his days at Singularity University.

For the first time in history, we have access to technology that can merge the reactive and affective elements of oral storytelling with the affordances of digital media, weaving stunning visuals, rich soundtracks, and complex meta-narratives in a story arena that has the capability to know you more intimately than any conventional storyteller could.

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Uptake of Digital Health Rises As it Lowers Human Medication Errors

Uptake of Digital Health Rises As it Lowers Human Medication Errors | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Demand for digital health is projected to soar in the near future. Digital health technologies, namely EHR, digital diagnostic systems, and wireless technologies leverage a variety of data – lad test results, patient history, radiology, immunization dates, allergies, diagnosis, and even insurance information – to bring about effective treatment.

Overall, digital health is a multi-disciplinary field that brings under its ambit engineering, social sciences, healthcare, health economics and management, and public health. It helps in exchanging patient information with other healthcare institutions such as emergency facilities, pharmacies, labs, clinics, and imaging facilities. One factor posing a hindrance to adoption digital health is the steep upfront capital needed to construct healthcare infrastructure. Developing nations, also have a lot of catch to do in terms of internet speeds. This is another factor dealing a blow to the market. Security and privacy threats and high cost of maintenance are other factors dampening growth in the market.

However, increased investments in digital health, rising demand for remote patient monitoring services, and favorable government initiatives will eventually help overcome such bottlenecks to growth. Emergence of more sophisticated healthcare IT, proliferation of smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices are also predicted to boost market growth. Further, progress in bio-sensing wearables are proving beneficial to the global digital health market too.

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Ray Kurzweil on Turing Tests, Brain Extenders, and AI Ethics

Ray Kurzweil on Turing Tests, Brain Extenders, and AI Ethics | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

INVENTOR AND AUTHOR Ray Kurzweil, who currently runs agroup at Google writing automatic responses to your emails in cooperation with the Gmail team, recently talked with WIRED Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson at the Council on Foreign Relations. Here’s an edited transcript of that conversation.

Nicholas Thompson: Let’s begin with you explaining the law of accelerating returns, which is one of the fundamental ideas underpinning your writing and your work.

Ray Kurzweil: Halfway through the Human Genome Project, 1 percent of the genome had been collected after seven years. So mainstream critics said, "I told you this wasn't gonna work. You're at seven years, 1 percent; it's going to take 700 years just like we said." My reaction at the time was: "Wow we finished 1 percent? We're almost done." Because 1 percent is only seven doublings from 100 percent. It had been doubling every year. Indeed, that continued. The project was finished seven years later. That's continued since the end of the genome project—that first genome cost a billion dollars and we're now down to $1,000.

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Tug, the Busy Little Robot Nurse, Will See You Now

Tug, the Busy Little Robot Nurse, Will See You Now | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
ROBOTS SEEM SO far away. We’re so many years from Jetsons-esque machines that live among us and wash our dishes and fold our clothes. But the reality is the robots have arrived—you’re just not noticing them.

Take a robot called Tug, for instance. No, Tug can't talk philosophy with you, and Tug can't do your laundry. But Tug is a pioneer. Because in hospitals around the world, this robot is helping nurses and doctors care for patients by autonomously delivering food and drugs, shouldering the burden of time-consuming mundanity. And now, it's rolling more and more into hotels, so get ready to see more of Tug.

If we’re being honest, Tug isn’t much to look at, unless you’re particularly fond of boxes on wheels. But really, it’s a self-driving car for the indoors. It navigates like a robocar would, using lasers to detect its surroundings and avoid obstacles. Step in front of it and it halts. Push an IV stand in its way and it routes around it.
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Opioids Haven't Solved Chronic Pain. Maybe Virtual Reality Can

Opioids Haven't Solved Chronic Pain. Maybe Virtual Reality Can | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The mind can play tricks on your body. Luckily, VR can play tricks right back.
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Your computer has no idea what you’re feeling—that needs to change

Your computer has no idea what you’re feeling—that needs to change | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
An emerging trend in artificial intelligence is to get computers to detect how we’re feeling and respond accordingly. They might even help us develop more compassion for one another.
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Quantum computing will change everything, and sooner than you expect

Quantum computing will change everything, and sooner than you expect | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Quantum computers can debug millions of lines of code in seconds. They can accurately predict phenomena despite hundreds of variables. And they're coming.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, October 14, 2:38 PM

Time to start digging into it!

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Dubai has its very own official cryptocurrency

Dubai has its very own official cryptocurrency | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The city of Dubai now has its own cryptocurrency, thanks to a new partnership fostered through the city's Accelerator Initiative. This new cryptocurrency, called emCash, runs on its own blockchain and is designed for various financial transactions.

Future city, future cash

The government of the city of Dubai launched their own blockchain-based cryptocurrency last week. The city’s economy department partnered with one of its subsidiaries called Emcredit Limited and U.K.-based Object Tech Group, Ltd. to create emCash. This new “encrypted digital currency” is a product of partnerships Dubai has cultivated through their Accelerators Initiative and brought under the umbrella of the Dubai Economy Accelerators.

“A digital currency has varied advantages – faster processing, improved delivery time, less complexity and cost, to name a few,” Dubai Economy deputy director general Ali Ibrahim said in a press statement. “It will change the way people live and do business in Dubai, and mark a giant leap for the city in harnessing game-changing innovations to improve ease of business and quality of life.

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