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5 Trends for 2013: NEXT | Amped | Big Think

5 Trends for 2013: NEXT | Amped | Big Think | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

1. Camera ready

1. The new Kinko's (makerspaces and 3D)

3. The sharing economy

4. Elective bionic surgery

5. Rise of the nones (non religious spiritual movement)

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[Infographic] The definitive guide to cryptocurrencies

[Infographic] The definitive guide to cryptocurrencies | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In 2009, a person or group under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto developed and released Bitcoin, the first cryptocurrency, and the world was never the same. Before long, it was rising in value, with investors all over the world buying in and other cryptocurrencies began cropping up. To date, Bitcoin has seen the height of almost $20,000USD and a catastrophic drop to just over $6,000USD. While the market is uncertain, one thing is: cryptocurrencies are here to stay and whether you’re interested in investing, a skeptical observer, or a complete novice, it’s important to understand crypto.

Crypto is based on a technology called blockchain. Through blockchain, nodes referred to as miners verify and solve cryptographic sequences which then allow transactions to occur between traders. They can be traded for other cryptocurrencies, fiat currency, or traditional goods and services. Despite government and regulatory agency criticism, more and more companies are beginning to accept cryptocurrency as payment.

While Bitcoin is the most valuable and popular, there are over a thousand different currencies traded on what are known as exchanges, which operate similarly to stock markets. These cryptocurrencies and exchanges are founded through what are known as initial coin offerings, or ICOs, similar to initial public offerings of company stock.

Even if you aren’t interested in investing yourself, cryptocurrency is already changing the world and not just financially. Blockchain technology is revolutionizing industries from real estate to healthcare and governmental organization. Don’t let the world pass you by. Learn more about the world of crypto with the infographic below, provided by Best Accounting Schools.

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235 Emerging Tech Trends For 2018 – Amy Webb –

2018 marks the beginning of the end of traditional smartphones. During the next decade, we will start to transition to the next era of computing and connected devices, which we will wear and will command using our voices, gesture and touch. The transition from smartphones to smart wearables and invisible interfaces — earbuds that have biometric sensors and speakers; rings and bracelets that sense motion; smart glasses that record and display information — will forever change how we experience the physical world. This doesn’t necessarily signal a post-screen existence. We anticipate foldable and scrollable screens for portable, longer-form reading and writing.

Everyone should be paying extremely close attention to China. The Chinese government is investing hundreds of billions of dollars into artificial intelligence, genomic editing, green technologies and renewable energy sources, smart farming systems and space exploration. To be fair, China has previously failed to deliver on similar bold investments and promises. This time around could be different, given the industrial policies already in play and Chinese-led advancements we’re seeing across AI, genomics and renewables. China has been quietly and strategically acquiring U.S. tech secrets via joint ventures and minority investment structures, giving it a tactical business, geopolitical and military advantage over not just the U.S., but also Japan, Korea, and the E.U. No other country’s government is racing towards the future with as much force and velocity as China, and this could signal big shifts in the balance of geopolitical power in the years ahead.

The artificial intelligence ecosystem — flooded with capital, hungry for commercial applications, and yet polluted with widespread, misplaced optimism and fear — will continue to swell. You will see the AI ecosystem represented in many of the trends in this report, and it is vitally important that all decision-makers and teams familiarize themselves with current and emerging AI trends.

Policymakers won’t be prepared to deal with new challenges that arise from emerging science and technology. The tension between privacy and security will increase. As a result, we are likely to see regulations, rules and legislation that are either too restrictive or don’t acknowledge that science and tech are in constant motion. 

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CRISPR-Cas9 Review: How is the Gene Editing Tool Changing the World?

CRISPR-Cas9 Review: How is the Gene Editing Tool Changing the World? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The European Biotech News Website
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With robots a rarity, India's factories are lagging the rest of the world —

With robots a rarity, India's factories are lagging the rest of the world — | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The robots are coming—but they aren’t here just yet.

There are only three robots per 10,000 employees in India, according to the 2017 World Robot Statistics (pdf) report issued by non-profit International Federation of Robotics (IFR) on Feb. 07. By comparison, the average robot density in the world was 74 in 2016.

South Korea, top of the leaderboard since 2010, was the most automated country in 2016 with 631 robots per 10,000 workers.
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How Blockchain Could End The Trade In Blood Diamonds - An Incredible Use Case Everyone Should Read

How Blockchain Could End The Trade In Blood Diamonds - An Incredible Use Case Everyone Should Read | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The international markets for diamonds and precious stones have taken steps to eradicate conflict diamonds as well as issues such as child labour in recent decades.

However even with measures such as the Kimberley Process in place, fraud and falsification is still a problem. Now, players such as De Beers and Fura Gems are looking to blockchain as a way to solve the problem once and for all.

Though blockchain is best known as the foundation of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, due to its ability to act as a decentralized ledger and record any type of transaction, industries from finance to healthcare are adopting it for very different uses.

At the beginning of this year, De Beers – which mines, trades and markets over 30% of the world’s supply of diamonds – announced that it will create the first blockchain ledger for tracing stones from the point they are mined right up to when they are sold to consumers.

This is seen as a hugely important part of the marketing process, as consumers are increasingly becoming aware of issues surrounding conflict diamonds, and demanding reassurance that stones they are buying as jewellery have been ethically sourced.

As blockchain technology is backed by highly sophisticated computer encryption, only those with permission – in this case those overseeing the mining, cutting, wholesale and retail of precious stones – can enter or edit data on the blockchain database.

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Larry Page's self-flying air taxis to take off in 3 years

Larry Page's self-flying air taxis to take off in 3 years | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Kitty Hawk, an aeronautics firm funded by Alphabet CEO and Google co-founder Larry Page, is inching closer to its plans of creating Uber for flights: it’s unveiled Cora, a fully electric self-flying air taxi that can cover 100 km (62 miles) on a single charge – and you’ll soon be able to hail one with your phone.

Cora has been in the works for a while now, and it’s just been cleared to begin tests in New Zealand. The goal is for Kitty Hawk to launch a fleet of its flying taxis within the next three years. You can watch a clip of the vehicle in action here.

Powered by batteries and driven by a dozen rotors, the vehicle has a wingspan of 3.6m (12 feet), and can seat two passengers. It can take off vertically, which means it doesn’t need a runaway to land on – a parking lot or rooftop will do. Kitty Hawk is already managing operations in New Zealand through Zephyr Airworks, a company it set up in the country in 2016, and is also building an app that will let you hail flights.

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Morality algorithm lets machines cooperate and compromise better than humans

Morality algorithm lets machines cooperate and compromise better than humans | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
A study from an international team of computer scientists set out to develop a new type of game-playing algorithm one that can play games that rely on traits like cooperation and compromise – and the researchers have found that machines can already deploy those characteristics better than humans.
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Hong Kong is so expensive that architects are building 100-square-foot ‘tube homes’ made from concrete water pipes

Hong Kong is so expensive that architects are building 100-square-foot ‘tube homes’ made from concrete water pipes | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

For the past seven years, Hong Kong has held the title of the world's priciest city for home-buyers, according to the 2017 Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey.

James Law, a Hong Kong-based architect, believes that his micro-homes could help alleviate the city's housing crisis. But his tiny home designs are anything but typical — they are concrete water pipes outfitted with all the amenities of a modern home.

Law explains more about his "tube home" design below.

Called the OPod, the "tube homes" measure 100 square feet. For perspective, a standard one-car garage is about 200 square feet.

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learning to create the future of work

learning to create the future of work | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

I recently wrote that when we look at the future of work, the loss of current jobs, and the effects of automation we should use a compass to guide us, not a list of what the jobs of the future may look like. These kinds of maps get dated too quickly. In preparing for this new world of work, policy makers and organizational leaders should look at how they can enhance self-determination for everyone: by fostering autonomy, competence, and relatedness. We are moving into an age of augmented work where much of the value we create is intangible, the knowledge we require to work is implicit, and most of this will be learned informally, outside the classroom.

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In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies

In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies

WRITTEN BY
Preeti Varathan

Amazon has disrupted fashion, books, furniture, food, cloud-based storage services, and much else besides. Now, it’s coming for one of the biggest, most complex industries in the US: healthcare.

Today (Jan. 30), Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan announced a vague but market-moving plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services to the companies’ employees at a lower cost. The venture, which will be managed by executives from the firms, will be run more like a non-profit, than a for-profit entity.

The market value of 10 large, listed health insurance and pharmacy stocks 1 dropped by a combined $30 billion in the first two hours of trading. At the time of writing, insurer MetLife was the hardest hit, down nearly 9% for the day.

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Google is using 46 billion data points to predict the medical outcomes of hospital patients

Google is using 46 billion data points to predict the medical outcomes of hospital patients | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Some of Google’s top AI researchers are trying to predict your medical outcome as soon as you’re admitted to the hospital.

A new research paper, published Jan. 24 with 34 co-authors and not peer-reviewed, claims better accuracy than existing software at predicting outcomes like whether a patient will die in the hospital, be discharged and readmitted, and their final diagnosis. To conduct the study, Google obtained de-identified data of 216,221 adults, with more than 46 billion data points between them. The data span 11 combined years at two hospitals, University of California San Francisco Medical Center (from 2012-2016) and University of Chicago Medicine (2009-2016).

While the results have not been independently validated, Google claims vast improvements over traditional models used today for predicting medical outcomes. Its biggest claim is the ability to predict patient deaths 24-48 hours before current methods, which could allow time for doctors to administer life-saving procedures.

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Never-before-seen viruses with weird DNA were just discovered in the ocean

Never-before-seen viruses with weird DNA were just discovered in the ocean | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Secret Domination
The ocean is crowded. As many as 10 million viruses can be found squirming in a single millilitre of its water, and it turns out they have friends we never even knew about.

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown family of viruses that dominate the ocean and can’t be detected by standard lab tests. Researchers suspect this viral multitude may already exist outside the water — maybe even inside us.

“We don’t think it’s ocean-specific at all,” says environmental microbiologist Martin Polz from MIT.
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Algorithms are making American inequality worse

Algorithms are making American inequality worse | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In a new book, political scientist Virginia Eubanks says using computers to decide who gets social services hurts the poor.


AI, artificial intelligence, inequality, Income inequality, algorithms, EmTech Digital 2018, MIT Technology Review Events, EmTech Next 2018

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New trend report: Amazon everything

New trend report: Amazon everything | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

From our homes to our healthcare, Amazon is seeping into every aspect of consumer lives. What's next?

Amazon Everything, a new report by J. Walter Thompson’s Innovation Group charts Amazon’s impact on consumer behavior and expectations, looking at what the giant retailer is up to now and next. Download the complimentary report here.

Amazon is in the middle of an ambitious multiyear shift from a store selling one product at a time to a full-fledged ecosystem. Amazon wants to be so deeply embedded in a customer’s life that buying happens as naturally as breathing, and nearly as often.” says David Streitfeld, The New York Times.

It’s hard to overestimate the size and influence of Amazon. The company has gone way beyond its role as a global e-commerce giant and has evolved into an entertainment, data, logistics and lifestyle powerhouse, and its offering is more diverse and ambidextrous than ever. In less than 25 years, Amazon has gone from being an online bookseller to a behemoth worth over $350 billion—more than Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, Kohl’s, JC Penney, Sears and Macy’s put together.

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Opinion | How to Make A.I. That’s Good for People - The New York Times

Opinion | How to Make A.I. That’s Good for People - The New York Times | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
For a field that was not well known outside of academia a decade ago, artificial intelligence has grown dizzyingly fast. Tech companies from Silicon Valley to Beijing are betting everything on it, venture capitalists are pouring billions into research and development, and start-ups are being created on what seems like a daily basis. If our era is the next Industrial Revolution, as many claim, A.I. is surely one of its driving forces.

It is an especially exciting time for a researcher like me. When I was a graduate student in computer science in the early 2000s, computers were barely able to detect sharp edges in photographs, let alone recognize something as loosely defined as a human face. But thanks to the growth of big data, advances in algorithms like neural networks and an abundance of powerful computer hardware, something momentous has occurred: A.I. has gone from an academic niche to the leading differentiator in a wide range of industries, including manufacturing, health care, transportation and retail.

I worry, however, that enthusiasm for A.I. is preventing us from reckoning with its looming effects on society. Despite its name, there is nothing “artificial” about this technology — it is made by humans, intended to behave like humans and affects humans. So if we want it to play a positive role in tomorrow’s world, it must be guided by human concerns.

I call this approach “human-centered A.I.” It consists of three goals that can help responsibly guide the development of intelligent machines.
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Theranos and Silicon Valley's 'Fake It Till You Make It' Culture

Theranos and Silicon Valley's 'Fake It Till You Make It' Culture | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

MORE THAN TWO years after a Wall Street Journal investigation exposed potential fraud at blood-testing startup Theranos, many of us have forgotten about the company. The Securities and Exchange Commission has not.

Wednesday, the regulatory agency charged CEO Elizabeth Holmes and former President Ramesh Balwani with an “elaborate, years-long fraud in which they exaggerated or made false statements about the company’s technology, business, and financial performance.” As a result of the SEC’s charges, Holmes has agreed to reduce her equity stake and voting control in the company. She’s also agreed to a 10-year ban on working at public companies.

More significant than the news is the message it’s meant to send to all Silicon Valley startups—not just those whose photogenic CEOs land on magazine covers.

“The Theranos story is an important lesson for Silicon Valley,” said Jina Choi, director of the SEC’s San Francisco Regional Office, in a statement. “Innovators who seek to revolutionize and disrupt an industry must tell investors the truth about what their technology can do today, not just what they hope it might do someday.”

The scale of Theranos’ alleged fraud is unusual, but the forces behind it are not. Startup culture venerates the kind of “fake it till you make it” hustling that Holmes deployed. When Theranos was first exposed, tech industry leaders defended the company. As more reporting about its wrongdoing emerged, industry leaders characterized Theranos as an outlier, not indicative of the broader startup culture. A music video made by a venture firm even included the line, “Theranos doesn’t represent us, we are better.”

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Beijing police are using facial-recognition glasses to identify car passengers and number plates | Impact Lab

Beijing police are using facial-recognition glasses to identify car passengers and number plates | Impact Lab | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Surveillance and facial recognition technology is on the rise in China. There are currently 170 million surveillance cameras, and the government hopes to more than triple that number by 2020. That would be nearly one camera for every two citizens, which the Ministry of Public Security hopes can eventually be used to identify any citizen within three seconds.

While experts worry about the infringement of privacy and human rights, the CEO of LLVision, Wu Fei, believes the concerns are unwarranted.

“We trust the government,” Wu told Reuters, adding that Beijing uses the AI-powered equipment for “noble causes.”

But one highly-policed region of China, Xinjiang, is regarded as a warning sign of what the government could be planning across the country.

Nearly 50% of Xinjiang’s population are Uyghurs, an ethnic Muslim minority, which the Chinese government treats with suspicion. Facial-recognition cameras are common across the region, license plate numbers are tracked and freedom to travel is drastically limited.

Xinjiang authorities have also requested residents install surveillance apps on their phones, plus DNA, iris scans, fingerprints, and blood types have been collected from citizens, sometimes without their knowledge.

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Google thinks it’s close to “quantum supremacy.” Here’s what that really means.

Google thinks it’s close to “quantum supremacy.” Here’s what that really means. | Futurewaves | Scoop.it


Seventy-two may not be a large number, but in quantum computing terms, it’s massive. This week Google unveiled Bristlecone, a new quantum computing chip with 72 quantum bits, or qubits—the fundamental units of computation in a quantum machine. As our qubit counter and timeline show, the previous record holder is a mere 50-qubit processor announced by IBM last year.

John Martinis, who heads Google’s effort, says his team still needs to do more testing, but he thinks it’s “pretty likely” that this year, perhaps even in just a few months, the new chip can achieve “quantum supremacy.” That’s the point at which a quantum computer can do calculations beyond the reach of today’s fastest supercomputers.

When Google or another team finally declares success, expect a flood of headlines about the dawn of a new and exciting era. Quantum computers are supposed to help us discover new pharmaceuticals and create new materials, as well as turning cryptography on its head.

But the reality is more complicated. “You’ll struggle to find any [researcher] who likes the term ‘quantum supremacy,’” says Simon Benjamin, a quantum expert at Oxford University. “It’s very catchy, but it’s a bit confusing and oversells what quantum computers will be able to do.”

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Japan's robot hotels

Japan's robot hotels | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

With tourist numbers surging and labor in short supply, a new hotel chain is making its mark with a staff of robots.
Henn na Hotels of Japan is using robots—some resembling humans, others resembling dinosaurs—as front-desk staff, porters and cleaners. It is an audacious move in a business that’s long relied on the human touch.

“We think that the number of people who can work for hotels will be less and less because of the population decline,” Yasuhiko Hoshi, associate director at HIS Hotel Holdings, tells the Innovation Group. “We reached the idea that hotel employees can be replaced by robots.”

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Brain-Like Chips Now Beat the Human Brain in Speed and Efficiency

Brain-Like Chips Now Beat the Human Brain in Speed and Efficiency | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Move over, deep learning. Neuromorphic computing—the next big thing in artificial intelligence—is on fire. Just last week, two studies individually unveiled computer chips modeled after in the human brain. The result? Brain-like hardware systems that compute faster—and more efficiently—than the human brain.
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This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems

This Google AI created a ‘child’ AI to help it solve problems | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In brief

Google's AutoML project, designed to make AI build other AIs, has now developed a computer vision system that vastly outperforms state-of-the-art-models. The project could improve how autonomous vehicles and next-generation AI robots "see."

An AI That Can Build AI

In May 2017, researchers at Google Brain announced the creation of AutoML, an artificial intelligence (AI) that’s capable of generating its own AIs. More recently, they decided to present AutoML with its biggest challenge to date, and the AI that can build AI created a “child” that outperformed all of its human-made counterparts.

The Google researchers automated the design of machine learning models using an approach called reinforcement learning. AutoML acts as a controller neural network that develops a child AI network for a specific task. For this particular child AI, which the researchers called NASNet, the task was recognizing objects — people, cars, traffic lights, handbags, backpacks, etc. — in a video in real-time.

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Digital Health Makes You A Superhero!

Digital Health Makes You A Superhero! | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Technology has the potential to transform how we think about our health
The current medical system in most countries works as a reactive setting. The patient goes to the doctor with existing symptoms, the physician diagnoses a condition, then prescribes drugs and/or recommends a treatment. According to the underlying dynamic, the medical professional articulates his decision based on his knowledge and the patient follows orders.

What happens when technology comes into play? What if the patient uses wearables and sensors to monitor vital signs and health parameters? Or what if he crowdsources medical information through patient communities or social media? With the rise of digital technologies, such as artificial narrow intelligence, robotics, virtual reality/augmented reality, telemedicine, 3D-printing, portable diagnostics, health sensors, wearables, etc. the entire structure of healthcare, as well as the roles of patients and doctors, will fundamentally shift from the current status quo. From reactive to preventive medicine. From a hierarchical patient-doctor relationship to a partnership.

While digital health is capable of amazing results (we could enumerate at least 60 things), it does not only mean the utilization of disruptive technologies, it’s rather a cultural transformation. It’s a change in attitude, policy and the entire system. The above-described transformation will not just happen to us, we need to be proactive drivers of such a systemic change. Patients who ask questions, who prepare for their visits to the doctor’s office with their own vital signs and parameters could drive this change. Patients who are not waiting for others to save them, but act as superheroes. And make no mistake, anyone could be a superhero. Starting tomorrow.

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What If Amazon Ran Hospitals? - The Medical Futurist

What If Amazon Ran Hospitals? - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Facebook, Google, and Amazon are aiming for new horizons. The playfield must be too small for them solely on the technology markets. They certainly have the capacity to move into new fields. As The Economist writes, their huge stock market valuations suggest that investors are counting on them to double or even triple in size in the next decade.

So, where do they want to utilize their power? Recent moves show they have ambitions in healthcare. Google has made steps forward in the field with Calico. Human Longevity Inc. joined forces with Cleveland Clinic for a human genomics collaboration aimed at disease discovery and making aging a chronic condition. In September 2017, Microsoft announced the launch of its new healthcare division at its Cambridge research facility, to use its artificial intelligence software to enter the health market. Its research plans include monitoring systems that can help keep patients out of hospitals and large studies into conditions such as diabetes.

And what about Amazon?
According to CNBC’s news in January 2018, the Seattle-based giant hired one of Amazon’s most high-profile hires to date in health, Martin Levine. He has been working for Iora Health, which focuses on Medicare patients in six US markets. He could be joining Amazon’s internal healthcare group known as 1492, which is testing a variety of secretive projects. Many analysts suspect that Amazon is considering selling prescription drugs online as rumor said in autumn 2017 or that it might be opening drug stores in its Whole Foods chains. Some analysts even considered Amazon’s popular digital assistant, Alexa as the future’s possible digital doctor. Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase also announced a partnership to cut health-care costs and improve services for their US employees.

So, US consumers might one day find themselves logging in to Amazon Healthcare Prime, or asking Dr. Alexa what they should do about their cold. But what if we go even further than that? Let’s do a thought experiment. What if Amazon decided to open a clinic in the future?

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The Love Oracle: Can AI Help You Succeed at Dating?

The Love Oracle: Can AI Help You Succeed at Dating? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Interacting with modern-day Alexa, Siri, and other chatterbots can be fun, but as personal assistants, these chatterbots can seem a little impersonal. What if, instead of asking them to turn the lights off, you were asking them how to mend a broken heart? New research from Japanese company NTT Resonant is attempting to make this a reality.

It can be a frustrating experience, as the scientists who’ve worked on AI and language in the last 60 years can attest.

Nowadays, we have algorithms that can transcribe most of human speech, natural language processors that can answer some fairly complicated questions, and twitter-bots that can be programmed to produce what seems like coherent English. Nevertheless, when they interact with actual humans, it is readily apparent that AIs don’t truly understand us. They can memorize a string of definitions of words, for example, but they might be unable to rephrase a sentence or explain what it means: total recall, zero comprehension.

Advances like Stanford’s Sentiment Analysis attempt to add context to the strings of characters, in the form of the emotional implications of the word. But it’s not fool-proof, and few AIs can provide what you might call emotionally appropriate responses.

The real question is whether neural networks need to understand us to be useful. Their flexible structure, which allows them to be trained on a vast array of initial data, can produce some astonishing, uncanny-valley-like results.

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The Possibility Report

The Possibility Report | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

An exploration of how new technologies will reframe our understanding of the world. A multi-part series, delving into new themes monthly. MOVE CONNECT HEAL LEARN BUILD GROW

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