Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape

Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We've covered Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci surgical robot for years. In fact, to some, the system's long history—1.5 million surgeries dating back to 2000—may be one of its most surprising attributes. But this video really drives home the system's dexterity. Using a new tool, the FDA-approved Single-Site Wristed Needle Driver, a surgeon guides the bot to gently stitch the …
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Why Anesthesia Is One of the Greatest Medical Mysteries of Our Time

Why Anesthesia Is One of the Greatest Medical Mysteries of Our Time | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Anesthesia was a major medical breakthrough, allowing us to lose consciousness during surgery and other painful procedures. Trouble is, we're not entirely sure how it works.
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Robot uses steerable needles to treat brain clots | KurzweilAI

Robot uses steerable needles to treat brain clots | KurzweilAI | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Steerable needle robot (credit: Joe Howell/Vanderbilt) Vanderbilt University researchers are developing an image-guided robotic surgical system to remove
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Genetically engineered pig hearts survived more than a year in baboon abdomens

Genetically engineered pig hearts survived more than a year in baboon abdomens | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The heart didn't beat for the baboon, but it did overcome the risk of organ rejection.

 

By breeding piglets with a few choice human genes, scientists were able to create sort-of-pig hearts that seem to be compatible with primate hosts. The organ wasn't used as a heart, but was instead grafted into the abdomen of an otherwise healthy baboon. After over a year, the best of the hearts are still living, viable organs. Next stop, the chest cavity!

 

Researchers at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health will publish their results in the September issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, though their findings were discussed several months ago at a conference. According to the study, the researchers experimented with different degrees of genetic modification in the pigs. They prevented all of the piglets from producing certain enzymes known to cause organ rejection in baboons (and, by extension, humans) but were given different gene alterations to keep blood from clotting, which is another common issue.

 

The most successful group had the human thrombomodulin gene added to their genomes. The expression of this gene prevented clotting, lead investigator Muhammad M. Mohiuddin said in a statement. While the average survival of the other groups were 70 days, 21 days and 80 days, the thrombomodulin group survived an average of 200 days in the baboon abdomen. And three of the five grafts in the group were still alive at 200 to 500 days since their grafting, when the study was submitted for review.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Is Robotic Surgery as Safe as It Seems?

“Haphazard” system of reporting yields misleading picture of safety Despite widespread adoption by hospitals of surgical robot technology over the past decade, a “slapdash” system of reporting complications paints an unclear picture of its safety,...
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