Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
2.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Technology/Futurism/Science/Education/SystemsThinking/
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Art of Communicating Science

The Art of Communicating Science | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A conversation with Karl Bates,director of research communications at Duke
Sharrock's insight:

Insight treasure trove in one paragraph here…Mind blown!

 

This is a powerful insight in the article and it needs to be shared:

 

“So, in offensively broad terms, I’d say the scientist is fairly obsessive about precision, and wants to at least identify – if not absolutely control – all variables.  They strive to be comprehensive and worry about what they’ve left out.  I think some of them live in mortal fear of being seen as superficial, especially among their colleagues, so more information is almost always a better thing.  Their vocabulary is off-putting to the uninitiated, but it can be super-precise, just the way they like it.  And after many years, I started to recognize this huge difference in cognitive style between scientists and the rest of us: they are really comfortable spreading out and labeling all of the pieces of the puzzle before they get down to figuring out what it might represent.  Most folks like to study the box to know what the picture is first!”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Back to School: Protecting Your Child from Identity Theft | NakedLaw

Back to School: Protecting Your Child from Identity Theft | NakedLaw | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
As kids go back to school, parents need to know the signs that child identity theft happened, and how to prevent it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Is Science The New Latin?!

Is Science The New Latin?! | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Most scientists aren’t natural communicators. Scientific discoveries aren’t written in Latin, but they may as well be. In this environment, creationism and denialism thrive…
Sharrock's insight:

The challenge here is to help the general public understand concepts that defy personal experience. Too many machines come between what is being studies and what a person can actually see. According to a some lectures I am listening to, it took Einstein 20 years to understand the quantum world, and in the end, he still had problems with accepting concepts like entaglement, even when his own investigations "uncovered" this concept. Technology is a way to approach that understanding, but technology is just "what works". It isn't PROOF of causation, of underlying systems of causation (ie, metaphysics). Then there is the math involved in some of these concepts. It just seems clear to me that in the pursuit of  STEM competence, engineering and technology is concrete so easier accept because the thing works. Creating the technology with engineering is acceptable even though few people will connect particular engineers to particular technologies. Intead, they connect organizations to the tech development--which is another disconnect. Coding for software is another area that is quickly approaching the magickal. People may learn coding basics, but the concepts involved in adaptive systems, expert systems, and the variousl levels of artificial intelligence seem to involve so many academic disciplines and collaboration that this too may be beyond the general public's understanding. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Defining Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Defining Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Open data is data that can be freely used, shared and built-on by anyone, anywhere, for any purpose. This is the summary of the full Open Definition which the Open Knowledge Foundation created in 2005 to provide both a succinct explanation and a detailed definition of open data.

 

As the open data movement grows, and even more governments and organisations sign up to open data, it becomes ever more important that there is a clear and agreed definition for what “open data” means if we are to realise the full benefits of openness, and avoid the risks of creating incompatibility between projects and splintering the community. 

more...
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:51 AM

"There are 2 important elements to openness:

Legal openness: you must be allowed to get the data legally, to build on it, and to share it. Legal openness is usually provided by applying an appropriate (open) license which allows for free access to and reuse of the data, or by placing data into the public domain.Technical openness: there should be no technical barriers to using that data. For example, providing data as printouts on paper (or as tables in PDF documents) makes the information extremely difficult to work with. So the Open Definition has various requirements for “technical openness,” such as requiring that data be machine readable and available in bulk.

- See more at: http://blog.okfn.org/2013/10/03/defining-open-data/#sthash.sADvs2Q8.dpuf";

Rescooped by Sharrock from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses?

How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Health tech entrepreneurs and a report released this week look at ways to bridge knowledge and behavior gaps in health technology.

Via Alex Butler
more...
Sven Awege's curator insight, February 25, 2013 4:17 AM

Social media and HIT combined can bring the behavioral changes, but as usual it will take time, more time than the pioneers expect.

The good thing is that it will definately happen, and will democratise health along the way.... slowly!

Alex Butler's comment, February 25, 2013 2:08 PM
I agree it will take time Sven, the interesting thing for me is that we have moved so quickly already. In a short space of time we have gone through the the democratization of information, into the even more powerful connectivity to each other and are coming out of the other side looking at big data and artificial intelligence shaping personal health management on a scale unimaginable 15 years ago. Technology becomes revolutionary though when it is no longer exciting but mundane and ubiquitous.
Denise Silber's curator insight, February 26, 2013 6:29 PM

This is the fundamental question

 
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

No questions asked: big data firm maps solutions without human input (Wired UK)

No questions asked: big data firm maps solutions without human input (Wired UK) | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Ayasdi, a company that has developed data visualisation software it says uses big data to answer the questions you never thought to ask, has launched in Palo Alto with $10.25 million (£6.4 million) in funding...
Sharrock's insight:

I think this is awesome. It is important to realize that humans make mistakes due to tiredness, boredom, emotional issues. I like the excerpt:

 

"Having spent 12 years in R&D at Stanford University, where researchers combined mathematics, computer science and data visualisation to built it, Ayasdi received hundreds of thousands of dollars in early backing from Darpa. The agency's former director Tony Tether is calling it "one of the top ten innovations developed at Darpa in the last decade" and "the key to unlocking some of the biggest national security challenges that we face today". That's a big thumbs up, considering the astonishing number of inventions and theories put forward by Darpa in recent years."

 

If this software performs as well as is reported, producing "knowledge" by finding connections and patterns in data automatically, there is still much human work to do. I saw something similar in a program that found elegant math equations to describe data. (I wonder why I haven't heard anything more about it...).

more...
No comment yet.