Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development
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Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development
Sustainable development is about acting now with an awareness of the future.
Curated by Kim Flintoff
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Breakthrough Energy Ventures has made its first two investments in energy-storage startups —

Breakthrough Energy Ventures has made its first two investments in energy-storage startups — | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
The way to reach the world’s climate goals is straightforward: reduce our greenhouse-gas emissions to zero within the next few decades. But the energy technologies that can help us get there tend to need lots of money and long lead times to develop. That’s why many conventional investors, who are looking for quicker returns, have burned their fingers investing in clean tech.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
The world needs radical new energy technologies to fight climate change. In 2016, Quartz reported that a group of billionaires—including Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Jack Ma, Mukesh Ambani, and Richard Branson—launched Breakthrough Energy Ventures (BEV) to invest at least $1 billion in creating those technologies. Now, 18 months later, Quartz can reveal the first two startups that BEV will be investing in: Form Energy and Quidnet Energy. Both companies are developing new technologies to store energy, but taking completely different approaches to achieve that goal.
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No death and an enhanced life: Is the future transhuman? | Technology | The Guardian

No death and an enhanced life: Is the future transhuman? | Technology | The Guardian | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

The 21st-century tech revolution is transforming human lives across the globe

Transhumanists believe that we should augment our bodies with new technology. 


The aims of the transhumanist movement are summed up by Mark O’Connell in his book To Be a Machine, which last week won the Wellcome Book prize. “It is their belief that we can and should eradicate ageing as a cause of death; that we can and should use technology to augment our bodies and our minds; that we can and should merge with machines, remaking ourselves, finally, in the image of our own higher ideals.”

The idea of technologically enhancing our bodies is not new. But the extent to which transhumanists take the concept is. In the past, we made devices such as wooden legs, hearing aids, spectacles and false teeth. In future, we might use implants to augment our senses so we can detect infrared or ultraviolet radiation directly or boost our cognitive processes by connecting ourselves to memory chips. Ultimately, by merging man and machine, science will produce humans who have vastly increased intelligence, strength, and lifespans; a near embodiment of gods.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
The idea of technologically enhancing our bodies is not new. But the extent to which transhumanists take the concept is. In the past, we made devices such as wooden legs, hearing aids, spectacles and false teeth. In future, we might use implants to augment our senses so we can detect infrared or ultraviolet radiation directly or boost our cognitive processes by connecting ourselves to memory chips. Ultimately, by merging man and machine, science will produce humans who have vastly increased intelligence, strength, and lifespans; a near embodiment of gods.
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This visualization shows 20 years of Earth’s seasons and the disturbing impact of climate change

In just 250 seconds you can watch 20 years of seasons flash by — polar ice caps shrink and grow again, while in more temperate climates the land darkens as plants grow, only to become paler as winter approaches.

The animation, created for NASA, is not a cartoon of how the changing seasons might look if sped up; it is an amalgamated collection of images harvested from satellites over the past two decades, from September 1997 to September 2017.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

In just 250 seconds you can watch 20 years of seasons flash by — polar ice caps shrink and grow again, while in more temperate climates the land darkens as plants grow, only to become paler as winter approaches.

The animation, created for NASA, is not a cartoon of how the changing seasons might look if sped up; it is an amalgamated collection of images harvested from satellites over the past two decades, from September 1997 to September 2017.

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Mine rehab in WA is the pits: Inquiry finds few success stories

Mine rehab in WA is the pits: Inquiry finds few success stories | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

West Australian mining industry representatives have struggled to point to even a single instance of a mine site having been rehabilitated to a high standard.

There are upwards of 11,000 abandoned mine sites and about 200,000 abandoned mining "features" across WA, features meaning things such as storage facilities, pits, shafts and tailings.

'Voids to the horizon': Collie's coal pits are nearing the end of their lives.  Photo: Wesfarmers


Mines get abandoned for many reasons: commodity prices collapsing or demand dipping, costs spiralling, lower than expected ore grades, regulatory breaches, changes in policy or government.

In these cases companies leave the taxpayer to clean up their messes: resulting in what are at best eyesores, at worst safety or public health risks.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
West Australian mining industry representatives have struggled to point to even a single instance of a mine site having been rehabilitated to a high standard.There are upwards of 11,000 abandoned mine sites and about 200,000 abandoned mining "features" across WA, features meaning things such as storage facilities, pits, shafts and tailings.
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Why blockchain challenges conventional thinking about intellectual property

Why blockchain challenges conventional thinking about intellectual property | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Cryptocurrencies are getting a lot of attention, but finance is only one of many applications of the blockchain technology behind it.

Blockchain technology is poised to revolutionise almost everything from supply chains (including illegal fishing and human rights abuses), insurance and health.

It is flourishing in an open-source environment, which raises the question whether our current intellectual property laws are fit for purpose to foster innovation.
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“You can’t just disconnect your kids”

“You can’t just disconnect your kids” | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Media researcher Michael Robb talks about the rise of personal devices among children and the importance of raising responsible digital citizens.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Media researcher Michael Robb talks about the rise of personal devices among children and the importance of raising responsible digital citizens.

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Our acid oceans will dissolve coral reef sands within decades

Our acid oceans will dissolve coral reef sands within decades | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Carbonate sands on coral reefs will start dissolving within about 30 years, on average, as oceans become more acidic, new research published today in Science shows.

Carbonate sands, which accumulate over thousands of years from the breakdown of coral and other reef organisms, are the building material for the frameworks of coral reefs and shallow reef environments like lagoons, reef flats and coral sand cays.

But these sands are sensitive to the chemical make-up of sea water. As oceans absorb carbon dioxide, they acidify – and at a certain point, carbonate sands simply start to dissolve.

The world’s oceans have absorbed around one-third of human-emitted carbon dioxide.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Carbonate sands on coral reefs will start dissolving within about 30 years, on average, as oceans become more acidic, new research published today in Science shows.

Carbonate sands, which accumulate over thousands of years from the breakdown of coral and other reef organisms, are the building material for the frameworks of coral reefs and shallow reef environments like lagoons, reef flats and coral sand cays.

But these sands are sensitive to the chemical make-up of sea water. As oceans absorb carbon dioxide, they acidify – and at a certain point, carbonate sands simply start to dissolve.

The world’s oceans have absorbed around one-third of human-emitted carbon dioxide.

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Global sea level rise rate speeding up, 25 years of satellite data confirms - Science News

Global sea level rise rate speeding up, 25 years of satellite data confirms - Science News | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

The rate of global sea level rise is accelerating as ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland melt, an analysis of the first 25 years of satellite data confirms.

Key points
It was thought sea level rise was accelerating at steady 3mm a year
Analysis of first 25 years of satellite data shows rate going up by 3mm a year, plus 0.08mm a year, every year.
Acceleration largely being driven by melting of Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and likely to increase in future, say scientists

The study, by US scientists, has calculated the rate of global mean sea level rise is not just going up at a steady rate of 3mm a year, but has been increasing by an additional 0.08mm a year, every year since 1993.

If the rate of change continues at this pace, global mean sea levels will rise 61 centimetres between now and 2100, they report today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

The rate of global sea level rise is accelerating as ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland melt, an analysis of the first 25 years of satellite data confirms.

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Australia's solar power boom could almost double capacity in a year, analysts say | Australia news | The Guardian

Australia's solar power boom could almost double capacity in a year, analysts say | Australia news | The Guardian | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
A record-breaking month of rooftop installations and a flood of large-scale solar farms could almost double Australia’s solar power capacity in a single year, industry analysts say.

A massive solar energy boom is being predicted for 2018, after an unprecedented number of industrial solar farms were approved by the New South Wales and Queensland governments last year.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

A record-breaking month of rooftop installations and a flood of large-scale solar farms could almost double Australia’s solar power capacity in a single year, industry analysts say.

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PREPARING OUR YOUTH FOR AN INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE WORLD The OECD PISA global competence framework

PREPARING OUR YOUTH FOR AN INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE WORLD The OECD PISA global competence framework | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

Should we assess global competence?

 

Every school should encourage its students to try and make sense of the most pressing issues defining our times. The high demands placed on schools to help their students cope and succeed in an increasingly interconnected environment can only be met if education systems define new learning objectives based on a solid framework, and use different types of assessment to reflect on the effectiveness of their initiatives and teaching practices. In this context, PISA aims to provide a comprehensive overview of education systems’ efforts to create learning environments that invite young people to understand the world beyond their immediate environment, interact with others Introduction: The importance of an international global competence assessment  with respect for their rights and dignity, and take action towards building sustainable and thriving communities. A fundamental goal of this work is to support evidence-based decisions on how to improve curricula, teaching, assessments and schools’ responses to cultural diversity in order to prepare young people to become global citizens.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

Should we assess global competence?

 

Every school should encourage its students to try and make sense of the most pressing issues defining our times. The high demands placed on schools to help their students cope and succeed in an increasingly interconnected environment can only be met if education systems define new learning objectives based on a solid framework, and use different types of assessment to reflect on the effectiveness of their initiatives and teaching practices. In this context, PISA aims to provide a comprehensive overview of education systems’ efforts to create learning environments that invite young people to understand the world beyond their immediate environment, interact with others Introduction: The importance of an international global competence assessment  with respect for their rights and dignity, and take action towards building sustainable and thriving communities. A fundamental goal of this work is to support evidence-based decisions on how to improve curricula, teaching, assessments and schools’ responses to cultural diversity in order to prepare young people to become global citizens.

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Perth school invests in largest solar powered system

Perth school invests in largest solar powered system | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Perth’s Christ Church Grammar School will soon be home to Australia’s largest school solar powered system.

Chairman John Poynton said the 670 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system was expected to save around $195,000 and also provide an example of effective clean energy.

“Christ Church Grammar School has made an investment in solar power because not only do we want to reduce our carbon footprint for the benefit of future generations, we know that it will deliver financial benefits,” he said.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Perth’s Christ Church Grammar School will soon be home to Australia’s largest school solar powered system.

Chairman John Poynton said the 670 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system was expected to save around $195,000 and also provide an example of effective clean energy.

“Christ Church Grammar School has made an investment in solar power because not only do we want to reduce our carbon footprint for the benefit of future generations, we know that it will deliver financial benefits,” he said.

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Business leaders aren't backing up their promises on sustainable development goals

Business leaders aren't backing up their promises on sustainable development goals | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

It seems there is a gap between what Australian companies publicly state they are doing with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and what they are actually doing. Our research found that companies are still not meaningfully disclosing the way these goals are measured and reporting their contributions.

These UN goals show business how they can contribute to solving the world’s biggest sustainable development challenges.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

It seems there is a gap between what Australian companies publicly state they are doing with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and what they are actually doing. Our research found that companies are still not meaningfully disclosing the way these goals are measured and reporting their contributions.

These UN goals show business how they can contribute to solving the world’s biggest sustainable development challenges.

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Truly autonomous vehicles are finally real and on the roads right now

Truly autonomous vehicles are finally real and on the roads right now | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

Waymo today plans to announce its driverless vehicles have been operating on US roadways for weeks with total freedom. Tesla recently told shareholders it was on the verge of updating its Autopilot software for full autonomy. And Las Vegas will tomorrow become the first city in history to offer the public a ride in a completely driverless shuttle on regular roads with real traffic.

We’ve officially entered the age of level four autonomy for driverless cars.

On Wednesday November 8th the general public will have the opportunity to ride through a half-mile stretch of Las Vegas in a new shuttle built by French AI company Navya. The shuttle is autonomous; it doesn’t have a steering wheel or brake pedal. It’s being operated by non-profit American Automobile Association (AAA) as part of an initiative to help spread positive awareness for the technology.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

We’ve officially entered the age of level four autonomy for driverless cars.

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Nigel Robertson 's comment, November 10, 2017 4:31 AM
And then 'Self-driving shuttle bus in crash on first day' http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41923814
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Australia's Science Channel | The climate change we’re probably not noticing

Australia's Science Channel | The climate change we’re probably not noticing | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

While CO2 emissions are behind the global climate change that is currently focusing global thought, there is also a rather more subtle impact going on in the background

Kim Flintoff's insight:

While CO2 emissions are behind the global climate change that is currently focusing global thought, there is also a rather more subtle impact going on in the background

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Games legacy is an innovation hub

Games legacy is an innovation hub | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Work to transform the Commonwealth Games Village to form part of a 200-hectare Gold Coast health and knowledge precinct (GCHKP), which has been in development since 2001, has now begun.

The former Athlete’s Village is being re-made into a residential space for 2,500 people, while another seven hectares of parkland adjacent to the Village is to be handed over to Gold Coast City Council to manage, with 9.5 hectares of greenfield land reserved for health and innovation investment.

The project is spearheaded by the City of Gold Coast in collaboration with the Queensland government, Griffith University and Gold Coast Health is part of a $550 million Health and Knowledge legacy project.

The GCHKP is already home to Griffith University, Gold Coast University Hospital, and Gold Coast Private Hospital.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Work to transform the Commonwealth Games Village to form part of a 200-hectare Gold Coast health and knowledge precinct (GCHKP), which has been in development since 2001, has now begun.

The former Athlete’s Village is being re-made into a residential space for 2,500 people, while another seven hectares of parkland adjacent to the Village is to be handed over to Gold Coast City Council to manage, with 9.5 hectares of greenfield land reserved for health and innovation investment.

The project is spearheaded by the City of Gold Coast in collaboration with the Queensland government, Griffith University and Gold Coast Health is part of a $550 million Health and Knowledge legacy project.

The GCHKP is already home to Griffith University, Gold Coast University Hospital, and Gold Coast Private Hospital.

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We need to become global citizens to rebuild trust in our globalised world

We need to become global citizens to rebuild trust in our globalised world | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
The erosion of trust in a civil society is one of the greatest moral challenges facing the world today.

Democratic societies are anxious. Leaders, and the general public, are worried about extremism, terrorism and radicalisation. Educators and experts are rightly concerned about those who perpetuate approaches that resemble indoctrination. Such threats are making us less trusting of others, particularly of those we see as somehow different from ourselves.

A remedy may be found in educating people to be “global citizens”, who are not just caring, but are also critically engaged with ideas, beliefs and attitudes exhibited across the world. These global citizens can help to rebuild the lost trust in civil society in an increasingly diverse and globalised world.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
The erosion of trust in a civil society is one of the greatest moral challenges facing the world today.Democratic societies are anxious. Leaders, and the general public, are worried about extremism, terrorism and radicalisation. Educators and experts are rightly concerned about those who perpetuate approaches that resemble indoctrination. Such threats are making us less trusting of others, particularly of those we see as somehow different from ourselves.A remedy may be found in educating people to be “global citizens”, who are not just caring, but are also critically engaged with ideas, beliefs and attitudes exhibited across the world. These global citizens can help to rebuild the lost trust in civil society in an increasingly diverse and globalised world.
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Making climate models open source makes them even more useful

Making climate models open source makes them even more useful | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

Designing climate experiments is all but impossible in the real world. We can’t, for instance, study the effects of clouds by taking away all the clouds for a set period of time and seeing what happens.

Instead, we have to design our experiments virtually, by developing computer models. Now, a new open-source set of climate models has allowed this research to become more collaborative, efficient and reliable.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

Designing climate experiments is all but impossible in the real world. We can’t, for instance, study the effects of clouds by taking away all the clouds for a set period of time and seeing what happens.

Instead, we have to design our experiments virtually, by developing computer models. Now, a new open-source set of climate models has allowed this research to become more collaborative, efficient and reliable.

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Self-driving cars might be able to repair themselves in the future

Self-driving cars might be able to repair themselves in the future | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

Big data could lead to a future where cars are able to diagnose faults and repair themselves.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

Big data could lead to a future where cars are able to diagnose faults and repair themselves.

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Australian cities are crying out for better planning, but the research funding is missing

Australian cities are crying out for better planning, but the research funding is missing | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Although 90% of our population lives in cities, Australia lacks a national urban policy and our government provides insufficient funding for urban sustainability projects.

Good urban planning is important for a number of reasons. Australian cities face the possibility of significant disasters due to climate change. Air pollution kills 3,000 people a year. A housing price crisis has taken hold. Reports on the energy and oil vulnerability of Australian cities are disquieting. And food and water security often seem like policy afterthoughts.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Although 90% of our population lives in cities, Australia lacks a national urban policy and our government provides insufficient funding for urban sustainability projects.

Good urban planning is important for a number of reasons. Australian cities face the possibility of significant disasters due to climate change. Air pollution kills 3,000 people a year. A housing price crisis has taken hold. Reports on the energy and oil vulnerability of Australian cities are disquieting. And food and water security often seem like policy afterthoughts.

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How we decide who and what we care about – and whether robots stand a chance

How we decide who and what we care about – and whether robots stand a chance | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
When psychologists talk about a “moral circle” they are referring to how far we extend our moral consideration towards others. That is, whether we care about the well-being of others, and act accordingly.

For most of us, the continuum of our moral circle is pretty straightforward: we include our loved ones, and we aren’t all that concerned about rocks or the villains of society. But the middle ground between the obvious ins and the obvious outs are not quite as clear-cut.

In a paper published in this month’s issue of Current Directions of Psychological Science, myself and a team of researchers from The University of Queensland, The University of Melbourne, and The University of Bath synthesised this emerging field of psychological research. We found that our moral circles are a surprisingly multifaceted and impressionable element of our moral cognition.

And historical trends suggest they are expanding, meaning the future of our moral circles may be vastly different from today. Could they one day include robots?
Kim Flintoff's insight:

When psychologists talk about a “moral circle” they are referring to how far we extend our moral consideration towards others. That is, whether we care about the well-being of others, and act accordingly.

For most of us, the continuum of our moral circle is pretty straightforward: we include our loved ones, and we aren’t all that concerned about rocks or the villains of society. But the middle ground between the obvious ins and the obvious outs are not quite as clear-cut.

In a paper published in this month’s issue of Current Directions of Psychological Science, myself and a team of researchers from The University of Queensland, The University of Melbourne, and The University of Bath synthesised this emerging field of psychological research. We found that our moral circles are a surprisingly multifaceted and impressionable element of our moral cognition.

And historical trends suggest they are expanding, meaning the future of our moral circles may be vastly different from today. Could they one day include robots?

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How to make smart cities human again

How to make smart cities human again | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Huge quantities of networked sensors have appeared in cities across the world in recent years. These include cameras and sensors that count the number of passers by, devices to sense air quality, traffic flow detectors, and even bee hive monitors. There are also large amounts of information about how people use cities on social media services such as Twitter and foursquare.

Citizens are even making their own sensors – often using smart phones – to monitor their environment and share the information with others; for example, crowd-sourced noise pollution maps are becoming popular. All this information can be used by city leaders to create policies, with the aim of making cities “smarter” and more sustainable.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Huge quantities of networked sensors have appeared in cities across the world in recent years. These include cameras and sensors that count the number of passers by, devices to sense air quality, traffic flow detectors, and even bee hive monitors. There are also large amounts of information about how people use cities on social media services such as Twitter and foursquare.

Citizens are even making their own sensors – often using smart phones – to monitor their environment and share the information with others; for example, crowd-sourced noise pollution maps are becoming popular. All this information can be used by city leaders to create policies, with the aim of making cities “smarter” and more sustainable.

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SA homes to get free solar panels and batteries

SA homes to get free solar panels and batteries | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it

At least 50,000 South Australian homes will be given solar panels and batteries in a scheme by Elon Musk’s Tesla and the SA government to build the world’s largest virtual power plant, slashing household power bills in the process.

Under the deal unveiled by Premier Jay Weatherill, solar systems and batteries will be supplied and installed free of charge.

The cost of the project will be financed through the sale of electricity, generated by the panels, in what Mr Weatherill said would be the largest project of its kind.

The government will this week issue an expression of interest for a retailer to deliver the program, with the intention of bringing additional competition to the market.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

At least 50,000 South Australian homes will be given solar panels and batteries in a scheme by Elon Musk’s Tesla and the SA government to build the world’s largest virtual power plant, slashing household power bills in the process.

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Gupta eyes an electric Lazarus

Gupta eyes an electric Lazarus | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Just when you thought vehicle manufacturing in Australia had gone the way of the dodo, billionaire UK investor Sanjeev Gupta has popped up with a bid to buy some of GMH’s old Elizabeth plant in South Australia to build electric vehicles here.

Mr Gupta is executive chairman of UK-based GFG Alliance and is already renowned as a rejuvenator of declining assets.

In the UK he is called the “man of steel” for rescuing 25 British steel mills, car plants and engineering workshops from closure, and the company website claims Mr Gupta has since 2013 acquired and relaunched 35 businesses worldwide, saving 11,000 jobs.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Just when you thought vehicle manufacturing in Australia had gone the way of the dodo, billionaire UK investor Sanjeev Gupta has popped up with a bid to buy some of GMH’s old Elizabeth plant in South Australia to build electric vehicles here.

Mr Gupta is executive chairman of UK-based GFG Alliance and is already renowned as a rejuvenator of declining assets.

In the UK he is called the “man of steel” for rescuing 25 British steel mills, car plants and engineering workshops from closure, and the company website claims Mr Gupta has since 2013 acquired and relaunched 35 businesses worldwide, saving 11,000 jobs.

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Cloud computing: Why a major cyber-attack could be as costly as a hurricane | ZDNet

Cloud computing: Why a major cyber-attack could be as costly as a hurricane | ZDNet | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
The economic damage of a successful major cyber-attack against a large cloud services provider could be similar in scale to the financial impact of a destructive hurricane.

The destructive tropical cyclone hurricane Katrina hit the US in 2005, causing $108bn in damage -- but that could be exceeded by the cost of a major cyber-attack, according to one expert.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
The economic damage of a successful major cyber-attack against a large cloud services provider could be similar in scale to the financial impact of a destructive hurricane.The destructive tropical cyclone hurricane Katrina hit the US in 2005, causing $108bn in damage -- but that could be exceeded by the cost of a major cyber-attack, according to one expert.
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What's the net cost of using renewables to hit Australia's climate target? Nothing

What's the net cost of using renewables to hit Australia's climate target? Nothing | Futures Thinking and Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Australia can meet its 2030 greenhouse emissions target at zero net cost, according to our analysis of a range of options for the National Electricity Market.

Our modelling shows that renewable energy can help hit Australia’s emissions reduction target of 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2030 effectively for free. This is because the cost of electricity from new-build wind and solar will be cheaper than replacing old fossil fuel generators with new ones.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Australia can meet its 2030 greenhouse emissions target at zero net cost, according to our analysis of a range of options for the National Electricity Market.

Our modelling shows that renewable energy can help hit Australia’s emissions reduction target of 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2030 effectively for free. This is because the cost of electricity from new-build wind and solar will be cheaper than replacing old fossil fuel generators with new ones.

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