Future Knowledge Management
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Future Knowledge Management
The evolution of Knowledge Management in organizations
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Is Your Company Encouraging Employees to Share What They Know? - blogs.hbr.org (blog)

Is Your Company Encouraging Employees to Share What They Know? - blogs.hbr.org (blog) | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Too much expertise is going to waste.

 

Many of the things we need to know to be successful – to innovate, collaborate, solve problems, and identify new opportunities – aren’t learned simply through schooling, training, or personal experience. Especially for today’s knowledge-based work, much of what we need to know we learn from others’ experiences, through what’s called vicarious learning.

Organizations know this learning is important, which is why they invest significant resources in handbooks, protocols, formal mentoring programs, and knowledge management systems to share employees’ experiences. Yet analyst estimates suggest that the companies in the Fortune 500 still lose a combined$31.5 billion per year from employees failing to share knowledge effectively.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Not enough value placed on tacit knowledge!

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The Wellspring of Ideas: Tacit Knowledge

The Wellspring of Ideas: Tacit Knowledge | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Tacit knowledge has emerged as the “holy grail” of sorts, with many organizations (including the World Bank) seeking a way to capture and deliver it.  Tacit knowledge is a difficult concept, which I thought was worth exploring a bit.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Tacit knowledge - one of the cornerstones of Knowledge Management!

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Mindy M Walker's curator insight, July 2, 2013 12:45 PM

From the Wold Bank blog, good discussion about tacit knowledge - a topic I 've been trying to wrap my brain around...

Mindy M Walker's comment, July 7, 2013 12:37 PM
@ Ms. du Toit: Agreed!
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Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t, by by Thomas C. Redman

Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t, by by Thomas C. Redman | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

"Predictive analytics is proving itself both powerful and perilous. Powerful, because advanced algorithms can take a near-unlimited number of factors into account, provide deep insights into variation, and scale to meet the needs of even the largest company. Perilous, because bad data and hidden false assumptions can seriously mislead. Further, algorithms cannot (yet, anyway) tap intuition — the soft factors that are not data inputs, the tacit knowledge that experienced managers deploy every day, nor the creative genius of innovators.

 

So what should managers, especially leaders, do? The obvious answer is employ both computer-based programs and your own intuition. In this post, I’ll use a series of simple plots to explain how to tap the potential of predictive analytics, sidestep the perils, and bring both the data and your good judgment to bear."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Algorithms and predictive analytics - the importance of intuition!

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3 key steps to form an effective knowledge sharing flow

3 key steps to form an effective knowledge sharing flow | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Josh:

When it comes to tacit knowledge, it is all about “people”, not content. Knowledge Management professionals’ role is not about how to “manage” knowledge anymore, but to facilitate people to share knowledge. The interesting change is that knowledge is not “distributed” anymore, but “communicated”.

In this case, I would say that knowledge sharing is about getting the right knowledge FROM the right person at the right time.

So, how do people “communicate” to share tacit knowledge? Before we talk about the steps for knowledge sharing, we need to understand that the three key elements for knowledge sharing are people, context and content.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Knowledge sharing process - to facilitate, and not to enforce!

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