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hygiene_personal.pdf

Aaron Abbott's insight:

Hazards in the kitchen don’t only affect the chef!! Correct food preparation is of utmost importance in industrial kitchens and at home.


As a chef or any type of worker that is responsible for the preparation of food to be consumed by others, maintaining personal hygiene and a clean and therefore safe environment for food preparation is a responsibility not to be taken lightly. Food preparation is a highly important aspect of Occupational Health and Safety in the kitchen.


Food poisoning is a serious health problem that can cause severe illness and in some cases can even cause death. Food that isn’t prepared properly leading to food poisoning can destroy the reputation of a business, which can result in the loss of employment for not only the chef but the co-workers within the business. Food poisoning can even damage the reputation of the food industry in general as it raises trust issues with having other people, even qualified people, preparing your food.


This scoop will assist in proper techniques for food preparation along with maintaining a high level of personal hygiene for working in the hospitality industry.

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Top 10 Kitchen Safety Tips - YouTube

Being aware of the top 10 safety and sanitation tips for the kitchen is important when working in a professional kitchen or while working in your home kitche...
Aaron Abbott's insight:

Although this video is not Australian in origin, it covers the top 10 aspects relevant to kitchen safety in particular the correct handling and storage of food. Areas that are covered in this video include:

 

Employee and employer awareness of rules, regulations and laws: When an employer is not informed properly than the employee will not be trained properly.

 

Personal hygiene: Maintaining personal hygiene throughout a shift.

 

Food preparation: Preparation of different foods, meats, etc.

 

Food storage: The correct storage of foods and particular food types to maintain the integrity of the food, and to stop it from spoiling.

 

Maintaining cleanliness of the kitchen: General cleaning.

 

Maintaining kitchen sanitation: Making sure kitchen surfaces are sanitized to prevent the likelihood of cross contamination.

 

Checking of stock on delivery: Assuring that the stock being delivered is of adequate quality and has been stored correctly thought the delivery process.

 

This video does use Fahrenheit instead of Celsius when discussing temperature is to which food should be cooked to preventing food poisoning, however the overall aspect of the video has a good focus towards the maintenance of a kitchen, the food stored and maintaining the quality of storage, and preparation all in effort to prevent cross contamination and food poisoning. This covers the responsibility and the duty of care regulated by the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations as to which hospitality and kitchen staff alike must adhere to.

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In the kitchen - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Cafe Online is an Workplace Health and Safety educational tool for the hospitality industry.
Aaron Abbott's insight:

This is an interactive website from the Queensland Government that covers the risks associated with working in the hospitality industry. Covering all risks associated with all aspects of hospitality, you can navigate your way through each area of the hospitality industry with areas such as restaurant, deliveries, manager, kitchen, drive thru, etc.

 

When you select an area, you will navigate through a variety of all of the potential risks in that particular area. This is followed by a list of suggestions and ideas in ways to prevent harm by minimising the risk, improving overall risk management and prevention guidance.

 

This is a website that has been put together really well, the interactive nature makes it an interesting way to cover Occupational Health and Safety in the hospitality industry and would make for a great learning tool for apprentice chefs, kitchen staff, and general staff in the hospitality industry.

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My Friend Trent - Retail Manager

My Friend Trent - Retail Manager | Friends and OHS | Scoop.it

Trent is the manager of the Dalby Telstra shop (which is award winning!). As a retail manager he is responsible for not only his own safety but a crew of staff members as well.

Aaron Abbott's insight:

Hazards in the retail industry offer a nice comparison to workplaces with more obvious hazards such as the others I have covered. Trent is a good friend of mine and is a manager at the local Dalby Telstra shop. Although it isn’t a big list, below we shall look at some of the hazards Trent faces within his line of work.

 

Customer Exposure: It goes without saying that when someone works in the retail industry that they will be exposed to a diversity of people from different backgrounds, ethnicities, and ages. This has its ups and down and when it comes to hazards in the workplace, this might not be the first thing that comes to mind. Trent may deal with upwards of 100 people each day and even more on the busier days. This increases his exposure to people who are sick, and or carrying transmissible diseases. The exposure is often unavoidable however through personal hygiene and regularly washing his hands, Trent can limit the potential of himself falling ill.

 

Physical and Environmental Hazards: Retail can require long shifts and even more so when you are the manager! Long periods of being on your feet can potentially create strains on knees and feet which is only exacerbated when you have to do the very same thing the following day. Good foot wear can help reduce foot and knee pain. Like any other retail store the Telstra shop has stock, which means at some point the stock has to be unloaded. This requires lifting objects that are sometimes heavy and awkward. Correct lifting techniques can help to avoid any back injuries.

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My mate Jack - Boilermaker.

My mate Jack - Boilermaker. | Friends and OHS | Scoop.it

Yes, his real name is Jack! He works as a boilermaker at Gessner industries in Toowoomba. Pictured at the back, Jack faces many day to day hazards in his line of work.

Aaron Abbott's insight:

The metal fabrication industry is one of many hazards that are diverse and have the potential to cause harm consisting from minor cuts and abrasions to life threatening injuries. Again, I will break down the hazards into separate sections for ease of identification.

 

Burns: One of the most common injuries in the metal fabrication industry are burns. This is due to the tolls used such as welders in which an inert gas, coupled with a continuous fed metal electrode creates a molten pool of metal which is used to basically stick one piece of metal to another. These temperatures can reach in excess of 1000 degrees Celsius depending on the metal and electrode used. Oxy-Acetylene is used to cut metal. This is commonly known as an 'Oxy' or a 'Cutting Torch'. Again, exceptionally high temperatures create the hazards for severe burns. The use of a cutting torch also leads to the hazard of explosions. This sounds dramatic but there is potential for what known as 'draw back'; this is where the flame produced by the cutting torch is sucked back into the acetylene cylinder which then explodes. The measure taken in prevention of this is adequate training of the person using the cutting torch and the use of 'flashbacks' which are devices attached to the hose of the cutting torch which prevent the flames from travelling back into the bottle. Whilst welding the arc emits ultraviolet radiation which may burn the skin (‘ray burn’) and eyes (‘welding flash’) making necessary the use of long sleeve work wear, welding gloves and a welding helmet.

 

Physical Trauma: With the diversity of tools and equipment as well as the material used in this industry, the potential for physical trauma is high. Tools such as grinders and drills may lead to injuries such as cuts and abrasions which can range from a minor cut, to surgical reattachment. Eye injuries are also common even with the use of safety glasses. This is due to the high speed that the metal grounds are travelling at which may ricochet off the lenses of the safety glasses into the person’s eye with enough force to necessitate removal by a doctor. The material used in this industry is often large and heavy which creates lifting hazards. The use of forklifts and cranes is often necessary which prevents the possibility of back injury from occurring.

 

Motorised vehicles: The use of forklifts and cranes can be hazardous especially when being operated around people. Flashing lights and reversing sirens help with this issue but the use of high visibility work wear is a necessary part of personal protective equipment to help make each worker more visible.

 

Environmental Hazards: Burning and welding metal emits toxic fumes and gases which over long periods of time can cause what is known as metal fume fever. The use of respirators for some metals are necessary whilst with other the welding helmet will suffice in preventing the inhalation of fumes and gases. Working for long shift in hot weather is only exacerbated by welding and the use of cutting torches. Dehydration is common but easily avoided with adequate consumption of water and electrolytes.

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uow040550.pdf

Aaron Abbott's insight:

A kitchen and dining area checklist provided by the University of Wollongong will assist any new or current staff member on what is required in the maintenance upheld within the hospitality industry. The checklist covers these areas:

 

Floor, Stairs, Aisles, and Landings: Areas are free from clutter and clean, with non slip flooring where necessary, etc.

 

Emergency Procedures: Emergency exits clearly identifiable, and clear, equipment available such as fire blankets and extinguishers, equipment inspected and tagged appropriately, etc.

 

First Aid: Signs and equipment within date, etc.

 

Electrical: Tested and tagged equipment free from any damage, etc.

 

Lighting: Adequate lighting throughout premises, etc.

 

Environment: Ventilation, quality of furniture, etc.

 

Kitchen: Equipment clean and operational, secured, and free from pests or evidence of pests, etc.

 

Maintaining these areas is not only for the wellbeing and safety of staff but also the safety of guests and customers within the hospitality industry. Although it is not the responsibility for the chef or kitchen hand or staff member to fix equipment (this needs to be done by a licenses electrician, plumber, etc.) it is their responsibility to make the manager aware of any issues with equipment so that it can be arranged to be fixed. The hospitality industry like many others is a team environment and relies on each staff member working together to create a safe workplace.

 

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ohs_in_the_hospitality_industry_4133.pdf

Aaron Abbott's insight:

This PDF document produced by Work Cover NSW is the Occupational Health and Safety in Hospitality Training Manual. This manual covers everything in Occupational Health and Safety management relevant to the hospitality industry for both employers and employees.

 

These areas are:

 

OHS Legislative Framework

 

Occupational Health and Safety Risk Management Systems

 

Specific Hazard Management

 

OHS Issues for Specific Service Areas

 

TRAINING – An Organisations Legal Obligations

 

OHS Consultation and Communication

 

OHS Documentation/record Keeping Processes

 

Workplace Injury Management and Workers Compensation

 

Emergency Management

 

Relevant Associated Legislation and Regulations

 

 

This document would be utilised in all venues in the hospitality industry in NSW. Although specific to a state, the document nonetheless covers all relevant areas regarding Occupational Health and Safety in the hospitality industry and in doing so sets the standard for polices and procedures of Occupational Health and Safety in the hospitality industry. This document utilises information from the NSW Occupation Health and Safety Act 2000 and The OHS Regulations 2001 to establish the duty of care to all people in NSW workplaces with regard to health, safety and welfare at work by employers and employees.

 

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My Friend Tyrone

My Friend Tyrone | Friends and OHS | Scoop.it

Tyrone (or as we call him, 'Tubs') on his new bike at a trail event. This sport has some pretty big potential for hazards and injury, some of which Tyrone has been subject to first hand.

Aaron Abbott's insight:

Tyrone is one of my friends who I used to go motorbike riding with. I personally no longer ride as I moved away and sold my bike but he has continued to head out for a ride as often a possible! More of a hobby than a job, motorbike riding has many hazards that can lead to some pretty serious injuries and in very unfortunate cases, loss of life.

 

Tyrone has ridden motorbike long before I started riding with him so it was always a challenge to keep up! The environmental hazards that coincide with this sport and hobby include exposure to inclimate weather, long periods without water leading to dehydration, and sun exposure leading to sunburns. Whilst on a bike wherever you a riding you always have a nice breeze so at times it’s easy to forget that the sun is burning your skin. Sunscreen is the first line of defence for avoiding some nasty burns (although it isn’t always worn!). Camel packs, which are backpacks with water bladders inside of them allow the easy transport of water wherever one chooses to ride and I don’t think I have seen Tyrone without one!

 

The Hazard of Trauma: This is the big one in this sport. Tyrone mostly does trail rides which consist of long distances over a variety of terrains including through small rivers and creeks, over rocky ground, up and down hills, and in thick forestry, all the while with several hundred other riders trying to get to the same place you are! This creates dangers not only for Tyrone but also every other rider out there; if one rider falls down, there is often a domino effect that takes place. Tyrone is the unfortunate owner of a lovely set of false teeth as he lost his real teeth in a motorbike accident that involved him hitting his face into the handle bars on the bike. Even with his motocross helmet on, the force still managed to knock all of his front teeth out. Falls from bikes can result in the loss of consciousness, broken limbs, impalement on objects which the rider lands on, crushed body parts from the force of impact, lacerations, and burns from when the motorbike lands on top of the rider and the hot engine or tailpipe burns the rider. The best possible way to reduce the likelihood of this occurring is proper riding gear such as helmet, motocross boots, gloves, goggles, body armour (plastic chest plate), etc. Although they may not stop a bone from breaking, they can and have proven to be effective in the minor speed falls.

 

This is a dangerous sport. High speed across diverse terrain with many other riders can end in tragedy. One of our friends had to have surgery due to an injury sustained whilst riding, others have been knocked unconscious and there have been cases where riders have lost their lives from injuries sustained whilst riding. It is a dangerous sport, but one that can be enjoyed when the right precautions have been made and everyone is sensible.

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Ashlee Rose- Apprentice Hair Dresser

Ashlee Rose- Apprentice Hair Dresser | Friends and OHS | Scoop.it

Ashlee Rose on the right hand side is my cousin who lives in Toowoomba. She is in her final year as a hair dressing apprentice.

Aaron Abbott's insight:

Ashlee Rose is my cousin who works as an apprentice hair dresser in Toowoomba. I never really thought of hair dressing being a job that would encounter many occupational hazards however, it would appear that I was incorrect!

 

In the hair dressing industry the occupational hazards are mostly present due to the high use of chemicals and hair products that contain chemicals and hazardous substances. Material safety data sheets are quite common in this area of work.

 

Obvious Hazards: The most obvious hazards in this role fall within the use of chemicals. This is not only the use of chemicals in the hair products themselves which can cause terrible drying and sometimes burns of Ashlee’s skin, but the use of chemicals used in cleaning. When dealing with up to 10 clients a day, there is a potential for bacteria to inhibit the salon so very regular cleaning with not so nice chemicals is required. The fumes emitted from the use of certain hair products and the likes of bleach also create a hazard; breathing in these fumes for the length of a shift can lead to terrible headaches. Short, regular breaks help limit the inhalation of chemical fumes and personal protective equipment where required can also help limit chemical burns. Tools of the trade such as scissors are another obvious hazard in the field of hair dressing as they are razor sharp and often require very little force to cut.

 

Environment Hazards: Longs periods of standing can cause damage to the knees, ankles, feet, and lower back. In addition, these long shifts also include periods of bending over which is infamous for creating back strain.

 

One of the less obvious hazards of hair dressing is working with people who aren’t always the most hygienic. Although uncommon, when you are touching other people’s hair all day you become more at risk for any transmissible bugs and rashes! Furthermore, if one of the clients is sick or is starting to become ill, side by side exposure for periods of up to several hours can increase the likelihood of transmission.

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My brother Andrew:

My brother Andrew: | Friends and OHS | Scoop.it

Andrew, or 'Drew' (on the left) is one of my brothers and is a qualified chef who has worked in kitchens in Australia and abroad. This picture was taken whilst he was working (and partying) in Whistler, Canada.

Aaron Abbott's insight:

Working in a kitchen can create many hazards. Some of which are obvious and some not so much.

 

Lets start with the obvious:

 

Slips, Trips and Falls: In the kitchen there is a lot of potential for slips to occur from spillages of sauces, water, oils, and any other fluid substances found in the kitchen. In a fast paced environment there may not always be time to clean up spills immediately which creates a hazard for everyone in the kitchen. This is an obvious hazard and is partly counteracted with the use of personal protective equipment such as no slip shoes. Kitchens can range in sizes from small to large with mass amounts of equipment used for commercial food production. Some of this equipment is non electrical and some is. With an array of equipment such of that found in a kitchen, it bring about a hazard in which the more equipment there is, the more potential said equipment to be in the road and may even cause tripping hazards.

 

Burns, Scalds and Cuts: It goes without saying that the purpose of a kitchen is to cook food. Food is cooked with heat (generally not always!). This heat comes in many different forms such as salamander ovens, industrial ovens, grills, deep fryers, and microwaves. The 'tools' used to cook the food are generally frying pans, saucepans, or trays which absorb the heat and can be a hazards unto their own. An unobservant chef/cook has the possibility to burn themselves by handling these tools without the assistance of gloves or tea towels, which leads to burns on hands and fingers. Furthermore, the product being cooked wether sauce or meat or pasta, etc, can be spilt which will lead to scalds, most often 2nd degree burns. Knives are probably one of the most obvious tools for a chef to use. Knives create a dangerous environment for not only the person using them but others in the kitchen as they are exceptionally sharp.

 

The less obvious hazards in a kitchen:

 

Environmental Personal Hazards: An industrial, commercial or professional kitchen will all come with environmental hazards. These are due to the stressful and fast paced nature of the hospitality industry and the demand for meals to be out on time. This environment can lead to fatigue and dehydration as the shifts are incredibly fast paced which doesn't always allow time for drink breaks. Stress and fatigue are not only a hazard at the workplace but out of the workplace, specifically driving home after work. Operation of a motor vehicle whilst fatigued and stressed may lead to serious car accidents (although this is uncommon it is nonetheless a potential hazard of working in this industry).

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