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Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein's creation

Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein's creation | Frankenstein | Scoop.it

We will each write a ghost story, said Lord Byron, and his proposition was acceded to.” So wrote Mary Shelley in the preface to her first novel, Frankenstein, published in 1831, 15 years after one of the most mythologised events in literary history. That was the famous night at the Villa Diodati, near Lake Geneva, in 1816, when Byron, Mary Godwin, Percy Shelley and John Polidori, Byron’s doctor, gathered by the fire to make up ghost stories. Two of the horror genre’s most enduring monsters were born: the vampire and Victor Frankenstein’s unnamed creation. But Mary also wrote herself into fiction by mythologising further a group of writers who have been the subject of both biography and fiction, ever since.


Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Rescooped by Amirah Adam from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Musical Theatre, Classic Film Done Right in ‘Young Frankenstein’

Musical Theatre, Classic Film Done Right in ‘Young Frankenstein’ | Frankenstein | Scoop.it

Translating a film to the stage does not always turn out as one might hope. Throw any doubts about that out the window with Music Theatre Fargo-Moorhead’s current production “Young Frankenstein.” Based on the classic film from 40 years ago, this musical rendition brings Mel Brooks’ monster hit to life onstage with a tremendous score of songs backed by a wildly talented cast.

Many people have seen the ’70s film starring Gene Wilder, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr and Peter Boyle, and will remember the various antics and exchanges between the characters (“What hump?”, “Vould you like to have a roll in ze hay?”, “What knockers!”). Dialogue from the film makes it mostly intact into this musical, with several scenes added in and some characters’ roles expanded.

One such character—the imperious Frau Blucher—exemplifies this wonderfully. Angie Schulz is in fine form as the housemaid of Frankenstein Castle. Her role takes on a more important part in this musical, appearing in more scenes and speaking much more than Cloris Leachman did in the film.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:56 AM

Translating a film to the stage does not always turn out as one might hope. Throw any doubts about that out the window with Music Theatre Fargo-Moorhead’s current production “Young Frankenstein.” Based on the classic film from 40 years ago, this musical rendition brings Mel Brooks’ monster hit to life onstage with a tremendous score of songs backed by a wildly talented cast.

Many people have seen the ’70s film starring Gene Wilder, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr and Peter Boyle, and will remember the various antics and exchanges between the characters (“What hump?”, “Vould you like to have a roll in ze hay?”, “What knockers!”). Dialogue from the film makes it mostly intact into this musical, with several scenes added in and some characters’ roles expanded.

One such character—the imperious Frau Blucher—exemplifies this wonderfully. Angie Schulz is in fine form as the housemaid of Frankenstein Castle. Her role takes on a more important part in this musical, appearing in more scenes and speaking much more than Cloris Leachman did in the film.