France's 75% income tax
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France Unveils 75 Percent Super-Rich Tax Rate

France Unveils 75 Percent Super-Rich Tax Rate | France's 75% income tax | Scoop.it
* Budget aims to slash deficit to 3.0 pct/GDP in 2013 * Bulk of savings comes from tax on rich, business * Economists say budget based on optimistic growth forecast By Daniel Flynn and Leigh Thomas ...
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Will France's Extremely High Income Tax Scare Away The Rich?

Will France's Extremely High Income Tax Scare Away The Rich? | France's 75% income tax | Scoop.it
What is 75 percent of €0.00? French president Francois Hollande wants to go back to the future on taxes. (Will France's 75 Percent Income Tax Scare Away The Rich?
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France to fight to meet deficit targets: finance minister - Reuters

France to fight to meet deficit targets: finance ministerReutersThe European Commission warned on Wednesday that France's forecasts were too optimistic and that tax hikes would hit growth next year, which it expects to be half the 0.8 percent...
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Will the rich flee France's 75% tax rate? - BBC News

Will the rich flee France's 75% tax rate? - BBC News | France's 75% income tax | Scoop.it
BBC NewsWill the rich flee France's 75% tax rate?BBC NewsFrancois Tripet's office is littered with expensive art work and has one of the most fashionable addresses in Paris, but he is spending less and less time there.

Via French-News-Online.com
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France Pledges $25 Billion Tax Break to Businesses - The New American

France Pledges $25 Billion Tax Break to Businesses - The New American | France's 75% income tax | Scoop.it
CBC.caFrance Pledges $25 Billion Tax Break to BusinessesThe New AmericanThe measure also takes the form of an income tax credit, rather than a reduction in the social charges employers pay on salaries, as Gallois had suggested.
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