Content: Fractions and Their Operations
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Rapping Math Teachers Bring It

Rapping Math Teachers Bring It | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
The math rap will get stuck in your head: "Fractions, fractions, lights camera action." And your students will laugh as they learn from Mr. Duey, the rapping math teacher from Michigan who's posted
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This particular article relates to and is connected with the: How to Write Your Own Rap article. It tells about a particular teacher, Mr. Duey, who wrote a rap for his students about fractions that has become super popular across the country. While it is a little different and kind of out there, it reiterates and demonstrates an effective way of engaging and experiencing important content through the method of a song.

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Math

Math | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
Adding and Subtracting Fractions Flow Chart (common and un
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I found this flow chart to be extremely beneficial for students. Currently in my classroom we have been practicing and looking at adding and subtracting fractions using different methods. I think that this chart would serve as a supplemental resource for their operations with fractions because it has them ask themselves important questions as they are solving fraction problems. I know that the students will eventually understand this content without any help or problems, but I feel that this is a spectacular resource for them as they are still grasping and learning these concepts.

The students have used number lines with Cuisenaire rods and fraction strips to support their knowledge and understanding of adding and subtracting fractions, which is great. This particular flow chart alludes to the methods that are incorporated in the curriculum, and gives them a fun and engaging way to go through the steps of adding and subtracting fractions, as if there is a problem or mystery that they have to choose steps to solve and get to the end.

I am now thinking about how effective and meaningful having a flow like this would be for the students in math. It is really helpful for them to practice over and over with the steps in a math problem, until they can start to do it without having the steps right in front of them. This gives them one creative sheet that includes adding and subtracting, and it stays concise and to the point. In terms of learning, this not only helps students who are more visual, but also helps with those who are kinisthetic and really all types of learners. It is a tanglible map or maze for this particular content in math that involves a process, which they can visualize and experience through using this resource.

I think that the students are also not used to looking at and considering math this way, by using metacognition (thinking about their thinking) and asking themselves questions about the numbers, and in this case fractions, that they are interacting with.

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Math Coach's Corner: Building Fraction Number Sense

Math Coach's Corner: Building Fraction Number Sense | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
Rachel Dwyer's insight:
This particular resource is a great way to help students to better understand and develop a sense and understanding of fractions. The writer has been a math instructional coach for 15 years, and shares an effective way that she feels will allow children to take a different perspective on looking at and comparing fractions. With Fifth Grade exploring a lot of content on fractions, I think that this particular resource would greatly complement the approaches and concepts that the curriculum requires. My mentor and I have talked a lot about possible ways of instructing student on how to use a number line when working with fractions. I think that by using a candy bar to represent the whole, and then looking at particular parts of that candy bar to determine what what the fraction or the part of the whole that it would be. Our Fifth graders have struggled with fractions, and entered fifth grade with a minimal sense of fractions. I feel that this would be a great approach for students to build their fraction number sense, which they can then apply to the operations of fractions and the incorporation of other more difficult and different methods such as the number line, pattern blocks, and Cuisenaire rods. The impact of this methodology on my teaching is that it provides me with a different perspective and approach that, based on my experience and knowledge of my students, will allow me to provide a more authentic context for their learning through using a familiar object, a candy bar, and connecting it to fractions in Math. Student learning will be impacted in that the students will have a purpose and connection to their learning. As they are absorbing and digesting the different strategies that I mentioned, they can fall back on this experience of taking the candy bar and thinking about things in terms of parts and wholes and representing that on the number line. This will give them a context and a background knowledge to fuel their further exploration.
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How to Write Your Own Math Rap

How to Write Your Own Math Rap | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
Listen to the Rappin' Mathematician's song "PEMDAS Boss."
Click on arrow to start











Running time: 2:07 min.


This how-to article accompanies t
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

While this article does not specifically address fractions, it describes how you can create your own rap or song about math for your students, and provides a couple of examples that can be used. I still remember to this day all of the songs that I had learned in school about prepositions, days of the weeks, states, etc. I think that by having the kids come up with their own song about information in math can be a great way to help them to understand and know about the content that they are learning. The students in my class love music, and I think that they would be really engaged and excited about getting to write their own song, even if they have include math in it. They would still be really excited to get to do this with their peers, and it would allow the more musical ones to work with the more literary ones to come up with a product, which is similar to differentiation.

This allowed me to think about all of the songs that I learned and did in school, and now I am realizing that my instruction and teaching should include activities like this that provide fun and engaging ways for students to engage and interact with information to help them grasp and understand it better.

The students may or may not have experienced learning in this way, but it will give them responsibility and creativity in their own learning that they can control and manipulate, as long as they are utilizing the content. This also allows the integration of multiple subjects, because they are creating music and they are also writing.

This provides a great opportunity to have a different but meaningful experience for students to extend and stretch what they know.

Then the songs that they create and review will be stuck in their heads for as long as the ones I did in school have been stuck in mine.

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Math Coach's Corner: Building Fraction Number Sense

Math Coach's Corner: Building Fraction Number Sense | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
Rachel Dwyer's insight:
This particular resource is a great way to help students to better understand and develop a sense and understanding of fractions. The writer has been a math instructional coach for 15 years, and shares an effective way that she feels will allow children to take a different perspective on looking at and comparing fractions. With Fifth Grade exploring a lot of content on fractions, I think that this particular resource would greatly complement the approaches and concepts that the curriculum requires. My mentor and I have talked a lot about possible ways of instructing student on how to use a number line when working with fractions. I think that by using a candy bar to represent the whole, and then looking at particular parts of that candy bar to determine what what the fraction or the part of the whole that it would be. Our Fifth graders have struggled with fractions, and entered fifth grade with a minimal sense of fractions. I feel that this would be a great approach for students to build their fraction number sense, which they can then apply to the operations of fractions and the incorporation of other more difficult and different methods such as the number line, pattern blocks, and Cuisenaire rods. The impact of this methodology on my teaching is that it provides me with a different perspective and approach that, based on my experience and knowledge of my students, will allow me to provide a more authentic context for their learning through using a familiar object, a candy bar, and connecting it to fractions in Math. Student learning will be impacted in that the students will have a purpose and connection to their learning. As they are absorbing and digesting the different strategies that I mentioned, they can fall back on this experience of taking the candy bar and thinking about things in terms of parts and wholes and representing that on the number line. This will give them a context and a background knowledge to fuel their further exploration.
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A Passion for Fractions | Teaching Channel

A Passion for Fractions | Teaching Channel | Content: Fractions and Their Operations | Scoop.it
Great lesson to teach students how to multiply fractions. This multiple part lesson is perfect for grade 4 and 5 students as they learn to multiply fractions. Aligns with Common Core Standards for Math.

Via Mel Riddile
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

I think that this video of a lession on A Passion for Fractions is a great resource. While mainly targeted at 3-5 grade, this teacher implements and incorporates various strategies that are both teaching and learning practices, in this particular case of exploring fractions. A lot come through for me and connected with what we have been discussing in our classes and in Math in particular. This teacher starts with a story which uses and incorporates math to encourage interest and curiousity among the students. They are then guided to develop and explore a riddle to solve. She provides opportunities and specifically directs to extend previous understanding. She also guides them in exploring representations and understanding the task. She also discusses how she provides them with multiple entry points.

The math curriculum for Fifth Grade includes several units on fractions. I feel that the approach and meaningful experiences represented in this video have provided me with insight and some great ideas on how to teach students to multiply fractions.

One other aspect that I really appreciate is instilling in students a passion for fractions. This allows learning to be relevant and accessible for students when they experience content in a way that they can understand and relate to. This in turnves them an excitement and motivation for that learning, and they have a reason and purpose for learning it.

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Todd Parker's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:37 PM

This is another Teaching channel video.  I love this resource.  This one is dedicated to teaching fractions and is aligned with Common Core.  It lists the standards used and explains the techniques as you go.  It goes through showing the problem in multiple ways for multiple learning styles and how to walk students through a problem solving process.  My fifth graders have shown me that they need practice in working through and persevering in problem solving.  I believe that if we systematically walk them through a process, then they will eventually adopt this process for themselves and become more effective thinkers.  They are not there yet, but resources like this video are great learning tools for teachers on how to get the thinking across to the students.